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Rock Musicals: Turning On On-Broadway (See 

Editorial) ••• Complete MIDEM Survey* U. S. 
Talent: Amer- 
ica First?* •• 

‘B’ Sides Of 



Hits Turn Into Healthy ‘A’ Sides *** Chess 
Says Distrib Salesmen Say: ‘Forget Mono’** 
Brian Brolly Named Head Of MCA In England 

AL HIRT; HIS GOLDEN HORN Of PLENTY IntT. Section Begins Pg. 65 









THE ORIGINAL ENGLISH HIT 

Chris Far lowe 

HANDBAGS&GLADRAGS 

ZS7 5005 

written Reproduced byMichaeld’Abo 






Vol. XXIX— Number 29/February 10, 1968 



IHE INTERNATIONAL MUSIC-RECORD WEEKLY 




Publication Office / 1780 Broadway, New York, New York 10019 / Telephone: JUdson 6-2640 / Cable Address: Cash Box, N. Y. 


GEORGE ALBERT 

President and Publisher 

MARTY OSTROW 

Vice President 

LEON SCHUSTER 

Treasurer 


IRV LICHTMAN 

Editor in Chief 

EDITORIAL 

TOM McENTEE Assoc. Editor 
ALLAN DALE 
DANIEL BOTTSTEIN 
JOHN KLEIN 
MARV GOODMAN 
EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS 
MIKE MARTUCCI 
ANTHONY LANZETTA 
HEDDY ALBERT 


ADVERTISING 

BERNIE BLAKE 

Director of Advertising 
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES 
STAN SOIFER New York 
BILL STUPER New York 
HARVEY GELLER Hollywood 
WOODY HARDING 
Art Director 


COIN MACHINES & VENDING 

ED ADLUM 

General Manager 


BEN JONES Asst. 
CAMILLE COMPASIO Chicago 
LISSA MORROW Hollywood 


CIRCULATION 

THERESA TORTOSA Mgr. 


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HOLLYWOOD 

CAMILLE COMPASIO 

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(Phone: (312) FI 6-7272) 

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DIRECTOR 

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MARTEN 

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London, Wl, England 

Tel: 01-493-2868 

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Apartado 4025, 

Tel: 790990 

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ARGENTINA 

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Munich, Germany 

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Tel: 326410 

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Tel; 69-1538 

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SUBSCRIPTION RATES $20 per year anywhere in the U.S.A. 
Published weekly. Second class postage paid at New York, 
N. Y. 10001 U.S.A. 

Copyright © 1968 by The Cash Box Publishing Co., Inc. 
All right reserved. Copyright under Universal Copyright Con- 
vention. 


Turning (h On-Broadway 


For better or worse, for the enrichment 
of the theatre or not, the rock sound is 
knocking persistently on the door of On- 
Broadway. We had suggested in an edi- 
torial late last year that the 1967-68 
season could be a fateful year for the 
musical theatre. A number of young 
writers were listed as preparing scores 
for new shows, all of which prompted us 
to infer that the contemporary pop 
sound would finally have its day on the 
stage of some Schubert Row theatre. 
Well, to be frank about it, most of what 
we’ve heard so far has stuck pretty 
much to conventional musical theatre 
ideas, which is perfectly acceptable to 
us if time-tested formula is accom- 
panied by original, hummable tunes. 

So much for On-Broadway. The place 
where we should have set out sights was 
Off-Broadway. Upholding its traditional 
personality as the place where one can 
afford to try out new ideas, Off-Broadway 
has been giving the theatre what seems 
to be a weekly diet of “new rock musi- 
cals.” Granted that “book troubles” 
have plagued many of the newcomers; 
yet it’s significant that many reviewers 
have had kind words to say about much 
of the music. One musical, “Your Own 
Thing,” is even an unqualified smash. 


with RCA Victor making an historic 
original cast investment in the show 
(see story in this week’s issue). Another, 
“Hair,” also heard on an RCA set, has 
traveled slowly but surely to Broadway 
via Cheetah and now the Martin Beck 
Theatre. 

All that On-Broadway has to hear, of 
course, is that new ideas and/or writing 
or performing talents are meeting with 
success; one can now expect that rock 
scores will find a home in half-a-million- 
dollar productions starting next season, 
and, to be hip about it, “turn on Oh- 
Broadway.” 

There is reason to believe that critics 
who man the review departments of 
print media and radio and TV stations 
are looking forward to this. We have de- 
tected an impatient attitude on their 
parts with regard to productions that 
fail to recognize that the sounds floating 
out of Broadway shows are not always 
consistent with the sounds that blare 
out of Broadway record shops. 

By virtue of its already established 
record of success on downtown side 
streets, the rock show score is going to 
be tried uptown — where, supposedly, 
the action is. For better or worse, for the 
enrichment of the theatre or not. 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


3 



2 

3 


30 


LOVE IS BLUE 

Paul Maurlaf-Philips 40495 


CJ ^ 

5 36 


GREEN TAMBOURINE 

Lemon Pipers-Buddah 23 


JUDY IN DISGUISE 


2 1 


4 

SPOOKY 

Classics IV-Imperial 66259 

4 

9 

• 

• 

1 WISH IT WOULD RAIN 

The Temptations-Gordy 7068 

6 

22 

37 

• 

NOBODY BUT ME 

Human Beinz-Capitol 5990 

8 

16 

• 

7 

BEND ME, SHAPE ME 

American Breed-Acta 811 

3 

3 

39 

8 

GOIN' OUT OF MY HEAD/CAN'T 
TAKE MY EYES OFF YOU 

Lettermen-Capitol 2054 9 21 

40 

• 

BABY, NOW THAT I'VE 
FOUND YOU 

Foundations-Uni 55038 

13 

18 

• 

10 

MY BABY MUST BE A 
MAGICIAN 

Marvelettes-Tamla 54]58 

11 

15 

42 

43 

11 

SUSAN 

Buckinghams-Columbia 44378 

7 

8 

• 

12 

A DIFFERENT DRUM 

Stone Poneys-Capitol 2004 

12 

12 

45 

13 

SHE'S A RAINBOW 

Rolling Stones-London 906 

10 

13 

• 

14 

JUST AS MUCH AS EVER 

Bobby Vinton-Epic 10266 

14 

18 

47 

15 

ITCHYCOO PARK 

Small Faces- Immediate 501 

15 

19 

48 

16 

TOMORROW 

Strawberry Alarm Clock-Uni 55046 

18 

23 

49 

• 

BOTTLE OF WINE 

Fireballs-Atco 6491 

22 

42 

50 

18 

DARLIN' 

Beach Boys-Capitol 2068 

19 

10 

• 

19 

SUNDAY MORNIN' 

Spanky And Our Gang-Mercury 72765 

21 

29 

52 

• 

WE CAN FLY 

The Cowsills-MGM 13886 

25 

32 

• 

21 

TO GIVE 

Frankie Valli-Philips 40510 

17 

20 

54 

• 

1 WONDER WHAT SHE'S 
DOING TONIGHT 

Tommy Boyce & Bobby Hart-A&M 893 

30 

38 

• 

23 

CHAIN OF FOOLS 

Aretha Franklin-Atlantic 2464 

16 

4 

56 

24 

SKIP A ROPE 

Henson Carg!ll-Monument 1041 

26 

33 

57 

25 

WOMAN, WOMAN 



58 


Union Gap-Columbia 44297 20 5 


33 TELL MAMA 


Etta James-Cadet 5578 


STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE 

Jay & The Techniques-Smash 2142 


35 AM I THAT EASY 
TO FORGET 

Engelbert Humperdinck-Parrot 40023 


I THANK YOU 

Sam & Dave-Stax 242 


IF I COULD BUILD MY 
WORLD AROUND YOU 

Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell-Tamla 54161 

VALLEY OF THE DOLLS 

Dionne Warwick-Scepter 12203 

HELLO GOODBYE 

Beatles-Capitol 2056 

I HEARD IT THRU 
THE GRAPEVINE 

Gladys Knight & The Pips-Soul 35039 

WALK AWAY RENEE 

Four Tops-Motown 1119 


Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazlewood-Reprise 0651 

LOVE POWER 


Sandpebbles-Calla 141 


THERE IS 
MONEY 


The Dells'Cadet 6590 


Lovin' Spoonful-Kama Sutra 241 

THERE WAS A TIME 

James Brown-King 6144 

NEW ORLEANS 

Neil Diamond-Bang 554 

OH HOW IT HURTS 


Barbara Masan-Arctic 137 


BORN FREE 

Hesitations-Kapp 878 

BACK UP TRAIN 

Al Greene-Hot Line 15000 


GUITAR MAN . 

Elvis Presley-RCA 9425 

THE LESSON 

Vikki Carr-Liberty 56012 

GET OUT NOW 

Tommy James & The Shondells-Roulette 7000 

SKINNY LEGS AND ALL 

Joe Tex-Dial 4063 


THE END OF OUR ROAD 

Gladys Knight & Pips-Soul 35042 


TWO LITTLE KIDS 

Peaches & Herb-Date 1586 


NO SAD SONGS 

Joe Simon-Sound Stage 7 2602 

ZABADAK 

Dave Dee, Dozy, Becky, Mick & Tich-Imperial 66270 


1 CAN TAKE OR LEAVE 
YOUR LOVING 

H3rman's Hermits-MGM 13885 

31 

41 

59 

• 

CARMEN 

Herb Alpert & Tijuana Brass-A&M 890 

MEN ARE GETTIN' SCARCE 

WE'RE A WINNER 

Impressions-ABC 11022 

34 

43 

61 

Joe Tex-Dial 4069 

1 SECOND THAT EMOTION 

WORDS 

Bee-Gees-Atco 6548 

33 

49 

62 

Smokey Robinson & Miracles-Tamla 54159 

DO UNTO ME 

THE DOCK OF THE BAY 

Otis Redding-Volt 157 

39 

63 

63 

James & Bobby Purify-Bell 700 

MONTEREY 

YOU 

Marvin Gaye-Tamla 54160 

32 

40 

64 

Eric Burden 8t The Animals-MGM 13868 

MALAYISHA 

EVERYTHING THAT 
TOUCHES YOU 

Association-Warner Bros. 7163 

47 

79 

• 

Miriam Makeba-Reprise 0654 

CARPET MAN 

5th Dimension-Soul City 762 

SIMON SAYS 

1910 Fruit Gum Company-Buddah 24 

49 

67 

66 

SUNSHINE OF YOUR LOVE 

The Cream-Atco 6544 


27 

30 

67 

41 

53 

• 

24 

24 

69 

70 

46 

61 

71 

23 

25 

• 

60 

75 

73 

37 

7 

74 

28 

6 

75 

• 

63 

— 

77 

44 

50 

• 

45 

47 

79 

55 

73 

80 

40 

45 

81 

58 

68 

• 

38 

44 

83 

50 

52 

• 

53 

65 

• 

51 

46 

86 

61 

76 

• 

35 

39 


64 

82 

• 

42 

26 

89 


_ 

90 

48 

37 

91 

59 

70 

92 

56 

62 

93 

65 

64 

94 

— 

— 

95 

52 

28 

96 

62 

66 


54 

34 

97 

66 

69 

98 

75 

88 

99 

68 

74 

100 


HEY LITTLE ONE 

Glen Campbell'Cap!tol 2076 69 72 

HERE COMES THE RAIN, BABY 

Eddy Arnold-RCA 9437 78 — 


HI-HEEL SNEAKERS 

Elvis Presley-RCA 9425 71 — 

PERSONALITY— CHANTILLY LACE 


_ I 


Mitch Ryder-Dynavoice 905 

73 

86 

MISSION IMPOSSIBLE 

Lalo Schifrin-Dot 17059 

79 

85 

JUST DROPPED IN 

First Edition-Reprise 0655 

81 

, 

COUNT THE DAYS 

Inez & Charlie Foxx-Dynamo 112 

74 

78 

COLD FEET 

Albert King-Stax 241 

80 

91 

EXPLOSION IN MY SOUL 

Soul Survivors-Crimson 1012 

70 

58 

NIGHT FO'LAST 

Shorty Lang-Soul 35040 

89 



LOOK, HERE COMES THE SUN 

Sunshine Co. -Imperial 66280 85 



THE CLICK SONG NUMBER ONE 

Cher-Imperial 66282 — 



MAN NEEDS A WOMAN 

James Carr-Goldwax 332 

83 

87 

A MILLION TO ONE 

Five Stairsteps-Buddah 26 

86 



THANK U VERY MUCH 

ScaFFold-Bell 701 

88 



GOT WHAT YOU NEED 

Fantastic Johnny C-Phll LA Of Soul 309 





STOP 

Howard Tate- Verve 10573 

90 

92 

IN THE MIDNIGHT HOUR 

Mirettes-Revue 1004 





LA LA MEANS 1 LOVE YOU 

Delfonics-Philly Groove 150 





TRY IT 

Ohio Express-Cameo 2001 

92 

93 

THE BALLAD OF 
BONNIE & CLYDE 

Georgie Fame-Epic 10283 



LOVE IS BLUE 

Al Martino-Capitol 2102 





LOVE EXPLOSIONS 

Troy Keyes-ABC 11027 

95 

100 

IT'S NOT EASY 

Will-O-Bees-Date 1583 

93 

96 

BURNING SPEAR 

Soulful Strings-Cadet 5576 





WHERE IS MY MIND 

Vanilla Fudge-Atco 6554 

98 



YOU DON'T HAVE TO SAY 
YOU LOVE ME 

4 Sonics-Sport 110A 



PEOPLE WORLD 

J;m & Jean-Verve 5073 


_ 

CAB DRIVER 

Mills Bros. -Dot 17041 

99 

_ 

I'M GONNA MAKE 
YOU LOVE ME 

Madeline Bell-Philips 1007 



MUSIC, MUSIC, MUSIC 

Happenings-B.T. Puppy 538 





DO WHAT YOU GOTTA DO 

Al Wilson-Soul City 761 


_ 

FUNKY WAY 

Calvin Arnold-Venture 605 

97 


SUMMER TIME BLUES 

B!ue Cheer-Philips 40516 

— 

— 




— I 


r 


- 3 


— I 


ALPHABETIZED TOP iOO (INCLUDING PUBLISHERS AND LICENSEES) 


A Different Drum (Screen Gems, 
Columbia, BMI) 


12 


A Man Needs A Woman (Rise, AIM, BMI) 79 


80 


A Million To One (Jobete, BMI) 

Am I That Easy To Forget (4 Star, B*MI)..!!!] 35 
Baby Now That I’ve Found You (January, BMI) 9 

Back Ud Train (Tested, BMI) 50 

Bend Me, Shape Me (Heloise, BMI) 7 

Born Free (Screen Gems/Columbia, BMI) 49 

Bottle Of Wine (Deep Fork, ASCAP1... 17 

Burning Spear (Discus, BMI) . . . 91 

Cab Driver (Black Hawk, BMI) 95 

Carmen (Irving, BMI) 59 

Carpet Man (Johnny Rivers, BMI) 65 

Chain of Fools (14th Hour, Pronto, BMI) 23 

Cold Feet (East, BMI) 74 

Count the Days (Catalogue, BMI) 73 

Darlin’ (Sea of Tunes, BMI) 18 

Do Unto Me (Big 7, BMI) 62 

Do What You Gotta Do (Johnny Rivers, BMI).. 98 
Everything That Touches You (Beechwood, BMI) 31 
Explosion in My Soul (Double Diamond, BMI).. 75 

Funky Way (Mikim, BMI) 99 

Get Out Now (Patricia, B'MI) 53 

Goin’ Out of My Head (Saturday, 

Seasons Four, Vogue, BMI) 8 


Got What You Need (Dandelion, James Boy, BMI) 82 

Green Tambourine (Kama-Sutra, BMI) 2 

Guitar Man (Vector, BMI) 51 

Hello Goodbye (Maclen, BMI) 39 

Here Comes the Rain (Acuff Rose, BMI) 68 

Hey Little One (Sherman DeVorzon, BMI) 67 

Hi Heel Sneakers (Medal, B'MI) 69 

I Can Take or Leave Your Loving 

Miller, ASCAP) 26 

If I Could Build My Whole World 

Around You (Jobete, BMI) 37 

I Heard It Through The Grapevine (Jobete, BMI) 40 

I’m Gonna Mak You Love Me (Act 3, BMI) 96 

In The Midnight Hour (East, Cotillion, BMI). . 84 

I Second That Emotion (Jobete, BMI) 61 

I Thank You (East, Pronto, BMI) 36 

I Wish It Would Rain (Jobete, BMI) 5 

I Wonder What She’s Doing Tonight 

Screen Gems/Columbia, B'MI) 22 

Itchycoo Park (Nice Songs, BMI) 15 

It’s Not Easy (Screen Gems/Columbia, BMI).. 90 

Judy In Disguise (Su Ma, BMI) 3 

Just As Much As Ever (Roosevelt, BMI) 14 

Just Dropped In (Acuff Rose, BMI) 72 

La-La Means I Love You (Nickel Shoe, BMI). ... 85 

Look, Here Comes The Sun (Chardon, BMI).... 77 

Love Explosion (Zira, BMI) 89 


Love Is Blue (Croma, ASCAP) 1, 88 

Love Power (Unbelievable, BMI) 43 

Malayisha (Raj Kumar, BMI) 64 

Men Are Gettin Scarce (Tree, BMI) 60 

Mission Imoossible (Bruin, BMI) 71 

Money (Faithful Virtue, BMI) 45 

Montery (Slamina, Sea Lark, BMI) 63 

Music, Music, Music (Cromwell, ASCAP) 97 

My Baby Must Be A Magician (Jobete, BMI). ... 10 

New Orleans (Rockmasters, BMI) 47 

Night Fo’ Last (Jobete, BMI) 76 

No Sad Songs (Press, BMI) 57 

Nobody But Me (Weman, BMI) 6 

Oh How It Hurts (Blockbuster, BMI) 48 

People World (Akbestal, BMI) 94 

Personality/Chantilly Lace (Lloyd & 

Logan, Glad, BMI) 70 

She’s A Rainbow (Gideon, BMI) 13 

Simon Says (Kas Kat, BMI) 32 

Skinny Legs And All (Tree, BMI) 54 

Skip A Rope (Tree, BMI) 24 

Some Velvet Morning (Lee Hazlewood, ASCAP) 42 

Stop (Ray Mar, Rumbalero, BMI) 83 

Strawberry Shortcake (Patrick Bradley, BMI).. 34 

Spooky (Bill Lowery, BMI) 4 

Summer Time Blues (American, BMI) 100 

Sunday Morin’ (Blackwood, BMI) 19 


Sunshine of Your Love (Dratleaf, BMI) 66 

Susan (Bag-O-Tunes, Diogenes, BMI) 11 

Tell Mama (Flame, BMI) 33 

Thank You Very Much (Felicia, BMI) 81 

The Ballad of Bonnie & Clyde (Peer Int'l., BMI) 87 

The End of Our Road (Jobete, BMI) 55 

The Dock of The Bay (East, Time, 

Redwal, BMI) 29 

The End of Our Road (Jobet, BMI) 55 

The Lesson (Alta, ASCAP) 52 

There Is (Chevis, BMI) 44 

There Was A Time (Golo, BMI) 46 

To Give (Saturday, Seasons Four, BMI) 21 

Tomorrow (Alarm Clock, ASCAP) 16 

Try It (Blockwood, BMI) 86 

Two Little Kids (Jaynne, BMI) 56 

Valley of The Dolls (Leo Feist, ASCAP) 38 

Walk Away Renee (Twin Tone, BMI) 41 

We Can Fly (Akbestal, Luviin, BMI) 20 

We’re A Winner (Chi Sound, BMI) 27 

Where Is My Mind (Cotillion, BMI) 92 

Woman Woman (Glaser, BMI) 25 

Word (Nemperor, BMI) 28 

You (Jobete, BMI) 30 

You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me 

(Robbins, ASCAP) 93 

Zabadak (Al Gallico, BMI) 58 


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COMPILED FROM LEADING RETAIL OUTLETS— DOES NOT INCLUDE AIRPLAY REPORTS • SHARP UPWARD MOVE 


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ReCORDS 

DiSTRJBUTED BY 




:ash Box — February 10, 1968 




Perry expresses every parent’s prayer 
with his new Victor single. 

“The Father of Girls” 

c/w “Somebody Makes It So” #9448 





MIDEM 2: The Complete Story 


Student Populace Clues Rise To 
Boston's Boom In New Bisk Talent 


BOSTON — The Boston music scene is 
bursting with talent making headway 
on records, including such newcomers 
as the Ultimate Spinach and Beacon 
S. Union & Orpheus (all MGM pac- 
tees). Last year, Cash Box did a 
survey of the Boston market. Follow- 
ing is a further analysis of the Boston 
market, indicating why the city is ex- 
periencing a boom in new talent finds: 

The unique element that separates 
Boston from all other major American 
cities is its enormous student populace. 
There are over 78 colleges and uni- 
versities in Greater Boston with a 
combined student body that numbers 
well over 200,000. Thus huge group 
of aware young people exert a force 
that literally dictates the guides for 
nearly all the music entertainment in 
the Boston area. It not only effects 
the selection of live entertainment 
offered in concerts and at discotheques, 
but inspires new and exciting musical 
innovations. 

The standard type of entertainment 
most demanded is that of a semi- 
psychedelic and, or ultra-hip nature. 
This extensive and versatile category 
includes such performers as the Jeffer- 
son Airplane, The Mothers of Inven- 
tion, Ravi Schankar Bill Cosby, Tom 
Paxton, and the Momas and the Poppas. 
These and other top quality entertain- 
ers are the answer to an unseen, but 


FRONT COVER: 



In spotlight trumpeter A1 Hirt’s 
LP catalog during a big Jan. /Feb. 
promotion, RCA Victor Records can 
point to four Hirt sets that earned 
RIAA-certified gold records. The most 
recent was “The Best of A1 Hirt, Vol. 
1,” the award plaque of which is held 
by A1 and Norman Racusin, vp and 
general manager of the label. Hirt’s 
other gold LP’s include “Sugar Lips,” 
“Honey in the Horn” and “Cotton 
Candy.” The promotion, under the tag 
of “Horn of Plenty,” includes a 23- 
city promo-cencert tour by the star, 
and spotlights his latest album. “A1 
Hirt Plays Bert Kaempfert.” 


INDEX 

Album Plans 50 

Album Reviews 49, 51, 55 

Basic Album Inventory 54 

Bios for D.J.’s 12 

Coin Machine Section 78-86 

Country Music Section 58-64 

International Section 65-77 

Looking Ahead (Singles) 12 

Platter Spinner Patter 18 

R&B Top 50 40 

Radio Active 10 

Record Ramblings 20 

R.I.A. Gold Record Awards 50 

Singles Reviews 30, 32, 34 

Sure Shots 36 

Talent on Stage 44, 46 

Top 100 Albums 53 

Vital Statistics 26, 28 


obviously powerful request by the 
collective student intellect. 

Enjoy Previews 

Along with the more seasoned talent, 
the students frequently enjoy preview- 
ing fresh and untried newcomers. For 
this reason Boston has earned the 
reputation of being a “good” town for 
the unknown to come and display their 
wares. This liberal and inquisitive 
attitude is an unusual characteristic, 
distinctive, to intelligent young peo- 
ple and is exhibited to an unparalleled 
extent in Boston. 

The student population not only in- 
fluences the entertainment industry, 
but also contributes to its numbers. 
Several of today’s biggest names have 
risen from the academic unknown. 
Joan Baez, America’s most popular 
prophet of peace was once a coed in 
the ranks of Boston University. Cur- 
rently, further noteworthy potentials 
are the Atomic Bubble Gum, The Free 
Born and The Chosen Few. 

Boston’s colleges have provided a 
reservoir of young people who simply 
by their presence have established an 
exclusive sort of academic melting pot. 
These perceptive and multi-talented 
young adults are the prime factor in 
Boston’s overwhelming musical suc- 
cess. 


'B' Sides Of Hits Turn 
Into Healthy 'A' Sides 

NEW YORK — Flip sides of recent 
chart decks are mounting renewed 
chart campaigns for decks that fea- 
tured such hits as “I Say a Little 
Prayer,” “0-0 I Love You” and “I 
Can't Stand Myself.” 

Scepter’s Dionne Warwick is back 
on the charts with the flipside of her 
Top 10 success, “I Say a Little 
Prayer.” Tune is the film main-title 
(up for an Academy Award as the best 
song), “Valley of the Dolls.” It’s num- 
ber 38 (with a bullet) on this week’s 
Top 100. “There Is” has already out- 
distanced on the charts its onetime 
“A” side, “0-0 I Love You,” by the 
Dells on the Cadet label. “There Is” 
is number 44 (with a bullet) this 
week. 

A third instance of a flip success 
after “A” side chart strength is James 
Brown’s “There was a Time” (King). 
It is the backside of “I Can’t Stand 
Myself.” “Time” is number 46 this 
week, also with a bullet. 


NARAS Panel Will 
Discuss Compatible LP 

NEW YORK — A scrutiny of com- 
patible stereo records will be the 
subject of a panel discussion at an 
upcoming meeting of the New York 
Chapter of NARAS, the disk awards 
society. George Bimon, exec director 
of NARAS, said that the meeting 
would probably be held after the 
academy makes its annual grammy 
awards on Feb. 29. 

Invited to appear will be engineers 
and other tradesters who are either 
pro or con on whether there is truly 
such an achievement as a compatible 
disk. Also, the gathering is expected 
to touch on the matter of “electroni- 
cally-created” stereo (see last week’s 
issue on Federal Trade Commission’s 
clarification order) . 


Brian Brolly To Head 
MCA In England 
See Int'l News Report 


MIDEM 2 is over. No-one will 
deny that it has been a tremendous 
success. Cash Box along with music 
men from all over the world pays trib- 
ute to the organizer Bernard Chevry 
and his staff for a job well done. 
Chevry’s talents as an organizer, his 
ability to bring together, under one 
roof, music men from all over the 
world, combined with his tact and 
diplomacy make him a formidable as- 
set to the international record scene. 

Chevry was delighted with the suc- 
cess of the meeting which attracted 
2,500 participants from 38 nations. 
I'here were 287 offices and he esti- 
mates that next year there will be 
450. Over 4,000 songs were presented. 
200 artists and 390 journalists came to 
Cannes. It seems certain that the 
present MIDEM organization will not 
be big enough to welcome all the peo- 
ple who will want to attend Midem 
1969. Many more American publishers 
and producers are expected next year 
and even greater participation is likely 
to come from the East. Chevry esti- 
mates that the general turnover this 
year passed 12 million dollars. This 
is a very high figure and many partic- 
ipants might not agree with it. Many 
of the record companies and music 
publishers who were here last year 
reported that although business was 
good, turnover was down on 1967. 
However, this is understandable as 
having set a number of deals a year 
ago their needs were that much small- 
er. Generally speaking all the publish- 
ers attending MIDEM for the first 
time this year were surprised and 
more than satisfied with the business 
concluded. 

The market for MIDEM 1969 will 
once again be at the Martinez hotel, 
but with seven floors instead of five. 
Inevitably a number of improvements 
will have to be made. Although on bal- 
ance the organization this year was 
excellent, there were certain com- 
plaints. 

Communications Problems 

Communication by inter-office tele- 


MIDEM Legal Group 

One of the most important events 
of the MIDEM was the creation of an 
international committee of legal ad- 
visors specialized in record and pub- 
lishing business. 

In only three days (one of the 
MIDEM miracles) French lawyer 
Maitre Riviere met the major foreign 
lawyers to study the idea of a com- 
mittee which will inform the legal 
advisors of every change in the laws 
and statute law in different countries. 
Lawyers present in Cannes were en- 
thusiastic and accepted membership 
in the committee. The committee was 
constituted and joins legal advisors 
from United States (15 lawyers), Por- 
tugal, Holland, Germany, Canada, 
Switzerland, Italy, England and 
France. 


See C/P-Chappell Deal; 
Foreign Stake By MGM 

NEW YORK — The acquisition of 
Chappell Music by Cameo/Parkway 
Records appeared close last week. A 
joint announcement by C/P and Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer indicated that if C/P 
completed a deal to acquire Chappell 
Enterprises, MGM would purchase all 
the stock of Chappell & Co. Ltd. of 
London, an affiliate of CE. Cameo/ 
Parkway, the announcement said, is 
currently in the process of negotiat- 
ing for the parent company. 

If the deal goes through, MGM 
would then control the foreign end of 
Chappell. As a majority shareholder 
in Big 3 Music (Robbins-Feist-Miller), 
MGM would then operate the biggest 
music publishing operation in foreign 
markets. Chappell Music is the largest 
publishing set-up in the U.S. Price for 
Chappell, as previously reported, is 
said to be about $60 million. 


phone was almost impossible. The 
Sound and Television closed circuit 
system was without value as no-one 
had time or inclination to look at it, 
they were far too busy rushing around 
from office to office. The fact that this 
year, imlike last year at the Palais des 
Festivals, the offices were in converted 
suites of the Martinez, and therefore 
less open to the passerby, made casual 
meetings more difficult. It was neces- 
sary to seek out the people one wanted 
to visit. 

There were also complaints about 
the record players installed in the 
offices, which, it appeared, were far 
from adequate. 


2 MIDEM'S Next Year? 

The exact dates of next year’s 
MIDEM have not yet been fixe^ but 
will be known in about two months 
time. 

Meantime, Bernard Chevry plans to 
visit the United States in May of 
this year. He is also considering the 
possibility of staging two MIDEM 
conventions annually one in Cannes 
and one in the U.S. 

Chevry feels than an American 
MIDEM would attract participants 
from South America, Japan and Can- 
ada. 

Miami, with its sunny climate and 
easily accessible airport, is being con- 
sidered as a suitable location. 


Regarding the ideal duration of the 
meet opinions differed. Americans fa- 
vored a shorter stint, say five days 
instead of seven while many European 
participants found it difficult to see all 
the people they wanted to in the 
course of the week. However a longer 
convention would be out of the ques- 
tion. By the end of the week, everyone 
was exhausted and more than ready 
to ‘call it a day.’ The Galas, too, were 
heavily criticized. They were badly 
presented and the idea of having a 
different National Gala every night 
was unsuccessful and already Bernard 
Chevry has announced that a change 
of policy will be made next year. 
Firstly there will only be three or 
four galas instead of six and all of 
them will be International. Chevry 
plans to appoint an A & R Manager 
to line up artists from all over the 
world to achieve this International 
aim. Stars and unknown artists seek- 
ing an exposure medium will be in- 
vited. It is hoped that the Galas will 
be televised in a great number of 
countries thus giving the artist maxi- 
mum exploitation. 

It is also planned to alternate pop- 
ular and classical Galas, instead of, 
as this year running classical Galas 
in the early evening and popular Galas 
later. 

However, considering the enormity 
of the task the organization generally 
(Continued on page 66) 


More On MIDEM 
See Int'l News Report 


Inventor Receives Patent 
On Compatible 45 Adaptor 

NEW YORK — What about a compa- 
tible 45rpm disk adaptor for auto- 
matic changer phonos ? Gerald Shirley, 
a manufacturer of diamond needles, 
says he’s come up with a plastic de- 
vice that he claims will fit 95% of 
automatic changer spindles. Shirley 
has just received a patent (#3,365,201) 
for the device, called the Omnidaptor. 
His company, Aldshir Manufacturing, 
plans production by early summer. 
Shirley also heads the International 
Audio Stylus Corp. 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


7 


JU Martino Says: 


U. S. Artists Run Biff Risk in Too 
Much Attention To Toreiffn Markets 


NEW YORK — “To an American per- 
former, the American market is the 
most impoi’tant market, and the for- 
eign area has to be viewed as simply 
a plus factor.” 

This is the view of singer A1 Mar- 
tino, who has geared his career on 
Capitol Records of late with strictly 
English-lyric recordings. 

Martino contends that the U.S. per- 
former who puts too much of his time 
and effort into foreign markets runs 
the risk of losing out on the Ameri- 
can scene — in as short a span as six 
months to a year. Martino, who was 
a pioneer in the recording by artists 
of foreign translations of their hits 
back in the early 50’s, no longer cuts 
in a foreign language. He cites a 
number of reasons why. Once a for- 
eign language record is released, Mar- 
tino observes, the market it is aimed 
at will begin to expect a regular-re- 
lease schedule, an endeavor that may 
not be required each time an artist 
makes a regular English side; second- 
ly, Martino asserts, every American 
who attempts a foreign language has 
natural “flaws” in pronunciation that 
can easily displease the local disk 


RCA Cuts 'Own Thing:' 
Biggest Off-Bway Stake 

NEW YORK — RCA Records has set 
its second cast LP of the new wave 
of Off-Broadway rock musicals. Label 
has made its biggest Off-Broadway 
investment to date for “Your Own 
Thing,” a modern-dress version of 
Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night” that 
opened recently to rave reviews. It 
was pointed out that while RCA’s 
stake in the show is its high for Off- 
Broadway, it is not on a par with 
investments in musicals presented On- 
Broadway. 

Norman Racusin, RCA vp and 
general mnaager, announced the ac- 
quisition with the belief that “more 
and more, the rock musical is being 
accepted within the theatre as a 
genuine form in its own right, and 
it therefore deserves to be nourished 
with the same enthusiasm that every 
other major musical force has been 
treated to throughout the years.” 
(see this week’s editorial). RCA, not 
involved in the production costs of 
“Your Own Thing,” has already cut 
a rock musical, “Hair,” which started 
Off-Broadway and has moved on to 
the Cheetah and now the Martin Beck 
Theatre. 

“Your Own Thing,” with a score by 
Hal Hester and Danny Apolinar, was 
cut last Tuesday and Wednesday, 
with RCA setting a rush-release 
schedule on the set. Show stars Rusty 
Thacker and Leland Palmer. 

Interestingly, the music is yet to 
be published, but the authors expect 
to form their own publishing com- 
pany. 


buyer; thirdly, local disk buyers have 
gravitated towards talents in their 
own areas in recent years. 

Proved A Point 

Martino believes that an American 
can still come out on top abroad by 
singing in English. Martino turned 
down a request by German TV people 
to sing his “Spanish Eyes” hit in Ger- 
man when he was invited to help 
inaugurate German color TV some 
months ago. He insisted on doing the 
song in English; allowed to do it his 
own way, Martino said that he sold 
(Continued on page 44) 


PIP Buys Instrumental 
Master At MIDEM Confab 

NEW YORK— P.I.P. Records, the 
new full-price disk line of Pickwick In- 
ternational, has purchased its first 
master. Joe Abend, president of the 
company, made a deal at the recent 
MIDEM convention for the Ameri- 
can and Canadian rights to an instru- 
mental, “Where the Rainbow Ends,” 
featuring Tony Hiller and His Or- 
chestra. P.I.P. will rush it to market. 
Tune is a theme song for an Italian 
TV series composed by Cook and 
Greenway, who have penned such hits 
as “I Was Kaiser Bill’s Batman,” 
“You Got Your Troubles” and “Green, 
Green Grass of Home.” 

P.I.P. ’s first singles date is Cab 
Calloway’s “I Will Wait For You.” 


Randwood Starts Off w/ 
Welk Dates, Special LP 

HOLLYWOOD — Initial product from 
Randy Wood’s new disk operation, 
Randwood Records, is ready to roll. 
Lawrence Welk, formerly on Dot 
Records, Wood’s former label opera- 
tion, starts off the label with a single, 
“Green Tambourines,” the current hit 
on the Buddah label LP product to 
follow will include an LP by Welk 
and a special-project entry, “Four 
Score Pianos.” Welk’s Teleklew Pro- 
ductions will release its artist roster 
on Randwood. Welk cut about 50 
albums for Dot over the past 10 
years. His ABC-TV show is now in 
its 14th year. 

Appointed to handle the Randwood 
line are: Davis Sales, Denver; Gen- 
eral, Baltimore; Garmisa, Chicago; 
Jay Kay, Detroit; Lieberman, Minnea- 
polis; Commercial, St. Louis; Music 
Service, Great Falls, Mont.; Mangold, 
Charlotte; Pep, Los Angeles; Seaway, 
Cleveland; Seaboard, Hartford, Conn.; 
Campus, Miami; Stan’s Record Shop, 
Shreveport, La.; Wendy, Newark; 
Universal, Philadelphia; and Michro- 
phone, Honolulu. 


Rose Music Wins Court Renewal Battle 


NASHVILLE — Litigation between 
Audrey Williams, widow of the late 
Hank Williams, and Fred Rose Music, 
a publishing subsidiary of Acuff-Rose 
Publications, Inc., came to a close late 
last week with the Circuit Court of 
Montgomery, Ala. deciding in favor of 
the publishing house. The lengthy legal 
battle, originally filed and dismissed 
in the Federal Court in Montgomery, 
was re-filed in the Circuit Court in 
March, 1967 by Mrs. Williams, who 
petitioned to dissolve a contract call- 
ing for the renewal rights of Williams’ 
son. Hank Williams, Jr., to be assigned 
to Fred Rose Music. Judge Richard P. 
Emmet, who heard the case in Sept, of 
1967 without a jury, held that the con- 
tract, made in 1963, “was then, and is 
now, in the best interests of the ward 
t'Wiliiams, Jr.).” 

Williams, who divorced his wife 
prior to his death in 1952, gave her 
the rights to half of his royalties from 
MGM Records and Acuff-Rose as part 


of the property settlement. The re- 
maining half was to be paid to his es- 
tate. Upon his death, his son was de- 
clared by the Montgomery Court as 
the sole heir to that estate. 

Although the original term of the 
copyright of the Williams material 
was not due to begin expiring until 
1973, the renewal agreement was 
brought up ten years earlier at the in- 
struction of Mrs. Irene Smith, the sis- 
ter of Hank Williams, and the Alaba- 
ma guardian of Hank, Jr. At that time, 
MGM Films was making preparations 
to film the Hank Williams story (“Your 
Cheatin’ Heart”) and wanted assur- 
ance of the rights to use the songs in 
the picture into the renewal period. 

On the basis of the average annual 
royalty payments for the past several 
; years, it was testified that the Williams 
j interests could reasonably expect to be 
paid approximately $2,000,000 during 
the 28-year renewal period. 


Chess' Contact With Distrih Salesmen 
Termed A Lesson: 'Forget Mono Product' 


CHICAGO — Chess Records followed 
stereo” releases. This includes all R&B 
its recent new product presentation in 
St. Thomas with a whirlwind tour by 
a quartet of the label’s execs to 20 
cities. Setting a new policy for the 
company, distrib salesmen in 20 
cities were apprised of the new LP 
product (see last week’s issue). Trek 
covered six days starting on the Mon- 
day (22) following the St. Thomas 
event, and features a presentation 
similar to the showcase at the con- 
vention. 

According to Dick LaPalm, ad- 
merchandising director, the idea 
proved “very successful” and will con- 
tinue on a 3-times-a-year basis. In ad- 
dition to LaPalm, the Chess itinerants 
included Max Cooperstein, sales direc- 
tor; Bert Loob, LP sales chief; and 
Richie Salvador, eastern promo rep. 

Trek Lesson: Forget Mono 

Chess came away from these local 
visits, LaPalm said, with a feeling that 
the trade “can forget mono.” Label is 
already in the process of converting 
its entire catalog to stereo, with mono 
product being converted at the com- 
pany’s studios into “re-channeled for 


and spiritual albums, LaPalm said. 
Company started this undertaking five’ 
months ago, and is re-converting an 
average of six LP’s a day. LaPalm exj 
pects the project to be completed ini 
60 days. 

Bevy Of LP Jacket Awards 

Three of the label’s albums have 
been cited for their artwork in various 
local and international contests. The 
New York Art Directors Club awarded 
a prize to the cover of “Billy Stewart 
Teaches Old Standards New Tricks,” 
as did the Chicago Art Club. Creative 
Arts, a magazine, presented national 
awards to the Stewart LP and Ahmad 
Jamal’s “Cry Young.” 

Also, the Zurich International 
Graphic Association of Switzerland 
named “Groovin’ ” by the Soulful 
Strings as a global prize winner. The 
Stewart LP was designed by Howard 
Bloom and Bill Sharp. Jerry Grifiith, 
former Playboy art director now with 
Chess, created the art-work for both 
the Jamal and Soulful Strings sets. 
LaPalm noted that the LP’s competed 
with art work created for all types of 
products. 


Monument's Boots Randolph Program 
Eyes 50 Million Folks In 0. S. 


NASHVILLE— Monument Records is 
putting its biggest promo foot forward 
yet in behalf of Boots Randolph. A 
month-long program is expected to 
reach an audience of 50 Million in the 
U.S. 

Heavy Ad Campaign 
Steve Poncio, Monument vice-presi- 
dent and sales director, said heavy 
trade and consumer advertising is 
scheduled to celebrate “Boots Ran- 
dolph Month.” 

Four-color page ads will appear in 
Cash Box, Billboard and Record World. 
Similar ads will reach the consumer 
in eleven major markets via daily 
newspapers in Washington, Philadel- 
phia, Baltimore, San Francisco, Los 
Angeles, Chicago, St. Louis, Minne- 
apolis, Boston, New York and Cleve- 
land. 

New Product, Dealer Aids 
Dealers will be supplied with in- 
store display materials featuring the 
entire Randolph LP catalog. 

A new LP and single were released 
last week to take advantage of the 
expected excitement generated by the 
promotion. The single is titled “Fred” 
and was written by Neal Hefti. The 
material was discovered two weeks 
ago when Foster and Randolph were 
in Los Angeles and rush-recorded only 
last week in Nashville. Title of the 
new LP is “Boots Randolph’s Sunday 


Sax.” 

Several hundred radio stations 
throughout the country are joining in 
the salute and will spotlight Randolph 
material in special programming 
February 14. 

Additionally, a large number of con- 
sumer publications will carry feature 
articles about Randolph during the 
month. 

Similarly, Randolph is being pro- 
moted in foreign markets all over the 
world. The foreign promotion is be- 
ing co-ordinated out of Monument’s 
West Coast office by the label’s inter- 
national director, Bobby Weiss. 

P.A. Schedule 

Randolph, recently named to Play- 
boy Magazine’s All-Star Band in their 
annual reader’s poll, was in Philadel- 
phia, Washington and Baltimore last 
week. He filmed the Mike Douglas 
Show Wednesday (31) and with Mon- 
ument president Fred Foster hosted 
a reception in Philadelphia last 
Thursday (1). 

A similar reception was held in Bal- 
timore at the Playboy Club Friday 
(2), and on Saturday (3) Randolph 
and Foster visited with several U.S. 
Senators in Washington, on behalf 
of The National Committee For The 
Recording Arts. 



HISTORIC ‘FIND’ — RCA Victor believes that it has found out how the gold 
record was first used to symbolize sales of over 1,000,000 copies of a recording. 
On Feb. 10, 1942, over the Chesterfield Radio Broadcast, RCA’s Wally Earl pre- 
sented to Glenn Miller, a gold record (sprayed) and framed of “Chattanooga 
Choo Choo,” which on RCA’s Bluebird label was reported to have achieved sales 
of 1,200,000 copies. The framed record, which was found in the possession of 
Miller’s daughter, is held here by (left to right) David MacKay, lawyer for the 
Miller estate; Brad McCuen, R(]A A&R producer; and Henry Brief, executive 
director of the RIAA. 


8 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 



CADET/CONCEPT A SLIGHT DEVIATION FROM THE NORM 





THE DELLS 


THERE IS 


CADET 5590 


ETTA JAMES 

TELL 

MAMA 


CADET 5578 


THE SOULFUL STRINGS 

BURNING SPEAR 

CADET 5576 


LAURA LEE 


UP TIGHT 
GOOD MAN 


CHESS 2030 


BILLY STEWART 





1 


CHESS 2002 



ESS 


A survey of key radio stations in all important markets throughout the country to determine by percentage of those 
reporting which releases are being added to station play lists this week for the first time and also the degree of con- 
centration combining previous reports. Percentage figures on left indicate how many of the stations reporting this ^ 
week have added the following titles to their play list for the first time. Percentage figures on right irKlude total 
from left plus the percentage title received in prior week or weeks. 


(TALLY COMPLETED JANUARY 31, 1968— COVERS PRECEDING WEEK) 


% OF STATIONS 
ADDING TITLES TO 
PROG. SCHED. 
THIS WEEK 

TITLE ARTIST LABEL 

TOTAL % OF 
STATIONS TO HAVE 
ADDED TITLES TO 
PROG. SCHED. 
TO DATE 

50% 

Just Dropped In — First Edition — Reprise 

85% 

46% 

The End Of Our Road — Gladys Knight & Pips — Soul 

46% 

42% 

Maybe Just Today — Bobby Vee — Liberty 

42% 

40% 

Guitar Man — Elvis Presley — RCA 

70% 

38% 

There Was A Time — James Brown — King 

94% 

35% 

Carpet Man — 5th Dimension — Soul City 

63% 

33% 

In The Midnight Hour — Mirettes — Revue 

33% 

31% 

Too Much Talk — Paul Revere & Raiders — Columbia 

31% 

28% 

I'm Gonna Make You Love Me — Madeline Bell — Philips 

35% 

27% 

Walk Away Renee — Four Tops — Motown 

96% 

26% 

Get Out Now — Tommy James & Shondells — Roulette 

95% 

24% 

People World — ^Jim & Jean — Verve 

33% 

22% 

Mission Impossible — Lalo Schifrin — Dot 

30% 

21% 

Pledge Of My Love — Bobby Goldsboro — United Artists 

21% 

20% 

The Ballad Of Bonnie & Clyde — Georgie Fame — Epic 

20% 

18% 

The Click Song Number One — Cher — Imperial 

18% 

17% 

Simon Says — 1910 Fruitgum Co. — Buddah 

98% 

15% 

Soul Coaxin' — Raymond LeFevre — Four Corners 

28% 

14% 

Valley Of The Dolls — Dionne Warwick — Scepter 

97% 

13% 

There Is — Dells — Cadet 

82% 

12% 

Look Here Comes The Sun — Sunshine Company — Imperial 

28% 


LESS THAN 10%— BUT MORE THAN 5% 

Total % To Date 


“I 


Thank You Very Much — 
Scaffold — Bell 


34% 


It's Not Easy — 

Wi 1 1-0- Bees — Date 


7% 


Try It — Ohio Express- 
Cameo 


29% 


You Gotta Be Loved — 
Montanas — Independence 


7% 


iiiiiiiniiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiuiDiiuiiiiiiiiuiimiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiuim 


^ I 

r* 

■ J, 








Dear Delilah — Grapefruit- 
Equinox 


7% 




10 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


) 



* 


\ 



''/w You’re a Grand Old Flag 1014 


That’s the sparkling new single by 


star of The Flying Nun ’ 
seen by 18 million people weekly 


COLGEMS® 

Manufactured and 
Distributed by RCA 


* 








* 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


11 




■a 


TOP NEW 
LP RELEASES 

“TEUIN’ 

THE WORLD” 

WISCONSIN COMMUNITY 
CHOU) 

CRESCENT 3003 


“ANGELS 
WATCHING OVER 
ME” 

THE FAIRFIELD FOUR 

NASHBORO 7045 


“I MUST TELL 
JESUS” 

PROFESSOR ALEX BRADFORD 

NASHBORO 7046 


“AMERICA’S 

FAVORITE 

SPIRITUAL SINGING 
FAMILY” 

MAGGIE INGRAM 
& THE INGRAMETTES 

NASHBORO 705T 


JUST LIKE HIM” 

THE SUPREME ANGELS 

NASHBORO 7052 


“THE SHEPHERD 
AND HIS SHEEP” 

(SERMON) 

REVEREND ARTHUR SIMS 




NASHBORO 7053 

1011 WOODUND ST. 
Nashville, Tenn. 615-227-5081 




////iww /7/nm\ 

Ca rnhSmc Looking ahead 


A compilation, in order of strength, of up and coming records showing signs of 
breaking into The Cash Box Top 100. List is compiled from retail outlets. 


1 MAYBE JUST TODAY 

{Screen Gems— Columbic—BMI) 
Bobby Vee (Liberty 56014) 

2 TOO MUCH TALK 

(Boom— BMI) 

Paul Revere (Columbia 4444) 


3 SOUL COAXIN 

(Southern— ASCAP) 

Raymond LeFevre (Four Corners 147) 


4 BIRDS OF A FEATHER 

(Lowery— BMI) 

Joe South (Capitol 2060) 


5 LICKIN' STICK 

(Webb IV-BMI) 

George Porrence & Naturals (Shout 224) 


6 LOVE IS ALL AROUND 

(Dick James— BMI) 

Troggs (Fontana 1607) 


7 NO ONE KNOWS 

(Pocket Full Of Tunes— BMI) 

Every Mothers Son (MGM 13887) 


8 YOU HAVEN'T SEEN MY LOVE 

(Jobete— BMI) 

The Ones (Motown 1117) 


9 PLAYBOY 

(Acuff— Rose—BMI) 

Gene & Debbe (TRX 5006) 


10 DEAR DELILAH 

(Egg— BMI) 

Grapefruit (Equinox 70000) 


11 PLEDGE OF LOVE 

(Unart— BMI) 

Bobby Goldsboro (United Artists 50224) 


12 LOVE IS BLUE 

(Crom— ASCAP) 

Mammy Kellem (Epic 10282) 


13 RED, GREEN, YELLOW & BLUE 

(II— Gatto— BMI) 

Dickey Lee (Atco 6546) 


14 YOU GOTTA BE LOVED 

(Duchess— BMI) 

Montanas (Independence 83) 


15 DOTTIE I LIKE IT 

(Low— Twi— BMI) 

Tommy Roe (ABC 11039) 


16 SHOW TIME 

(Windgate— BMI) 

Detroit Emeralds (Ric Tic 135) 


17 TRESPASSIN' 

(Cudda Pane— BMI) 

Ohio Players (Compass 7015) 


18 QUESTION OF TEMPERTURE 

(Flugo & Luigi— BMI) 

Balloon Farm (Laurie 3405) 

19 UNCHAIN MY HEART 

(Teepee— ASCAP) 

Herbie Mann (A&M 896) 

20 BLESSED ARE THE LONELY 

(Sons of Ginza— BMI) 

Robert Knight (Rising Sons 707) 

21 7:30 GUIDED TOUR 

(Sunnybrook — BMI) 

Five Americans (Abnak 126) 

22 UP, UP & AWAY 

(Johnny Rivers— BMI) 

Hugh Masakela (UNI 55037) 


23 JEZEBEL 

(Hill & Range-BMI) 

Rumbles Ltd. (Mercury 72723) 

24 WITHOUT LOVE 

(Progressive— Suffolk— BMI) 

Oscar Toney Jr. (Bell 699) 

25 AT THE TOP OF THE STAIRS 

(Double— Diamond— BMI) 

Formations (MGM 13899) 


26 WHAT YOU WANT 

(HastingS“BM!) 

Music Explosion (Laurie 3429) 


27 let the heartaches begin 

(January— BMI) 

Long John Baldry (Warner Bros. 7098) 


28 1 LOVE HOW YOU LOVE ME 

(Screen Gems— Columbia— BMI) 
Claudine Longet (A&M 897) 


29 IF THE WHOLE WORLD 
STOPPED LOVIN' 

(Finger Lake— BMI) 

Val Doonican (Decca 32252) 

30 CAN'T FIND THE TIME 
YOU TO TELL 

(Interval— BMI) 

Orpheus (MGM 4524) 


31 never ever 

(Felicia— BMI) 

Peter & Gordon (Capitol 2071) 

32 OCTOBER COUNTRY 

( Living legend— BMI) 

The October Country (Epic 10252) 

33 CAMELOT 

(Chappell— ASCAP) 

King Richard's Fluegel Knights (MTA 138) 


34 QUICKSAND 

(Whitfield- BMI) 

Youngbloods (RCA Victor 9422) 


35 MY ANCESTORS 

(Ventage— BMI) 

Lou Rawls (Capitol 2084) 

36 MR. SOUL SATISFACTION 

(Unart— BMI) 

Timmy Willis (U.A. 1279) 


37 CAPTAIN OF YOUR SHIP 

(Cobra— BMI) 

Repara Ta- Delrans (Mala 589) 


38 ANOTHER TIME 

(Since— BMI) 

Sagittarius (Columbia 44398) 

39 I need a woman 

OF MY OWN 

(Catalogue— BMI) 

Tommy Hunt (Dyamo 13) 

40 baby please DON'T GO 

(Music Corp.— BMI) 

Amboy Dukes (Mainstream 676) 

41 DANCE TO THE MUSIC 

(Daly City-BMI) 

Sly & Family (Epic 10256) 

42 that'T all right 

(Duchess— BMI) 

Brenda Lee (Decca 32248) 

43 SUNSHINE HELP ME 

(Essex— ASCAP) 

Spooky Tooth (Mala 587) 

44 the goose 

(Le Baron— BMI) 

Parliaments (Revilot 214) 

45 A LOVE THAT'S REAL 

(Razor Sharp— BMI) 

The Intruders (Gamble 209) 

46 I CAN NOT STOP YOU 

(World International— BMI) 

Cherry Slush (U.S.A. 895) 

47 WHO AM I 

(Joyful Wisdon-BMI) 

Country Joe & Fish (Vanguard 35061) 

48 TO BE MY GIRL 

(Don-BMI) 

John Roberts (Duke 429) 

49 I need YOU 

(Irrational— BMI) 

Rationals (A2 107) 

50 ALL THE TIME 

(Cedarwood— BMI) 

Wayne Newton (MGM 13891) 


Bios ior 
Dee Jays ** 


Troy Keyes 



Troy Keyes, who has had bad luck 
in the past in having his records re- 
leased, has hit paydirt with his second " 
release, “Love Explosion,” on ABC 
Records. Troy, 23, grew up in a reli- 
gious atmosphere in New York City, 
where he first sang gospel songs. He v 
enrolled in voice training, concentrat- 
ing for the most part on classical ^ 
compositions. In his teens, he became 
fascinated with R&B and rock. Troy 
formed his own group, entered a local f 
talent contest in Brooklyn, was voted 
the winner, and made a recording as ' 
the result. But, due to cicumstances, 
the record was never released. The 
artist sang with several other R&B 
groups while still a teenager. He was ^ 
recorded again, but, once more, the 
record was not released. The jinx was 
broken with “Que Sera, Sera,” which 
was a success for the chanter. After 
serving in the Army, Troy was even- ' ' 
tually recorded by producer George 
Kerr. “Love Explosion,” number 89 on A - 
the charts this week, was the result. 
Troy Keyes’ luck would finally seem 
to have changed. 


Will-O-Bees 



The Will-O-Bees are comprised of -v 


Stephen Porter, 19; Robert Merchant- 
house, 21; and Janet Blossom, 20. 
Stephen sings bass and plays 6 and 12 
string acoustical guitar. Robert sings 
tenor. He is the lead singer and also 
plays 6 and 12 string acoustical guitar. 
Janet is a contra tenor vocalist. All 
from Richmond, Indiana, the trio 
started singing in January 1964 as a 
teenage folk group. Janet and Bob. at 
the time, were members of the Rich- 
mond High School concert choir. Orig- 
inally known as the New Ports, the 
Will-O-Bees first performed at the 
Masonic Glee Club Minstrel Show in 
April 1964. The group had many local 
engagements and appeared on pro- 
grams on Dayton, Ohio, TV outlets. 
After their first release, “Why Can’t 
They Accept Us,” the Will-O-Bees 
toured the record hop and college cir- 
cuit in the midwest. The threesome ^ 
appeared first in New York on Joe 
Franklin’s Memory Lane on WOR-TV. 
The Will-O-Bees’ current Date single, 
“It’s Not Easy,” is number 90 on the 
charts this week. 


12 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 



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KBMS-FM~Los Angeles a recent ac- 
quisition of Century Broadcasting 
Corp. in Chicago, has abandoned its 
previous image as an on-tape, back- 
ground-type operation. Under the 
aegis of new vice president and gen- 
eral manager Gordon Potter, former 
sales exec at WDVR-FM-Philadelphia 
and WQAL-FM-Philadelphia, KBMS- 
FM has been completely reorganized. 
The outlet is now operating with new 
equipment from studios and offices in 
the ultra modern Mutual Savings and 
Loan Building in Pasadena. KBMS- 
FM’s new format emphasizes music 
that is both familiar and easy on the 
ear (programmed by music director- 
program director Dave Shayer, ex- 
WDVR) with spoken comment kept to 
the briefest minimum. KBMS-FM goes 
stereo early this year. Another mem- 
ber of the new KBMS-FM manage- 
ment team is record industry vet 
Bruce Davidson, who is presently fill- 
ing the public relations slot. 

Gene Klavan and Dee Finch, 
WNEW-New York’s early morning 
team, are off to Puerto Rico on 
Wednesday, February 24, for a three- 
day meeting with Vice President Hu- 
bert Humphrey and the board of di- 
rectors of Discover America, Inc. The 
WNEW comedy team has been en- 
gaged to be the spokesmen for the 
1968 “Discover America” campaign, 
under the supervision of J. Walter 
Thompson Company. Last year’s cam- 
paign, with Gregory Peck as spokes- 
man, was carried on more than 1,200 
radio stations. Klavan and Finch will 
also participate in the creation of the 
campaign. Discover America, Inc., was 
founded by Presidential proclamation 
and Congressional resolution. Vice 
President Humphrey is vitally inter- 
ested in the organization, whose mis- 
sion ‘ is to encourage travel to and 
within the United States. 

A series of jazz sessions on Sunday 
afternoons at The Dom, a New York 
nitery located at iSt. Marks Place be- 
tween 2nd and 3rd Avenues, is once 
again being produced and emceed by 
Alan Grant, a leading personality on 
WABC-FM-New York. The shows, 
which premiered January 21, feature 
the Duke Pearson Big Band. Grant, 
who was instrumental in the launch- 
ing of the Thad Jones-Mel Lewis Jazz 
Band at the Village Vangupd two 
years ago, predicts great things for 
the Big Band. Last year, the Jones- 
Lewis aggregation finished third in a 
poll conducted by Downbeat Magazine. 
As a radio personality, producer, and 
emcee. Grant has become one of jazz’s 
major spokesmen in the New York 
area. He hosts two programs on 
WABC-FM, “Portraits in Jazz (10 
P.M, — ^midnight, Monday-Friday) and 
“Soxmds of the Big Bands” (10 P.M. 
— midnight, Satxirdays). He is also a 
frequent host of numerous jazz con- 
certe and festivals such as the Rhein- 
gold Central Park (Music Concerts and 
the Newport Jazz Festival, and is 
producer-emcee of shows at Carnegie 
Hall, Town Hall, and Village Theatre. 

In the first of a series of special 
assemblies designed to make youths 
aware of the need to look for summer 
employment early in the year, KATZ- 
St. Louis’ “KATZ Summer Job Cara- 
van” appeared on January 22 at O - 
Fallon Technical High School to the 
plaudits of more than 2,000 cheering 
teenagers. Doug Eason and Donny 
Broolu, KAI^ personalities, emceed 
the Caravan program, which made the 
roimds of St. Louis area high schools 
through February 1. The program 
brings together the job finding talents 
of the Missouri State Employment 
Service, the Human Development Cor- 
poration, and the hiring CMability of 
the Federal government. The “EATZ 
Summer Job Caravan” is the first 
phase in a 3-part community service 
project by KATZ to help teenagers 
find summer jobs. KATZ is also con- 
tacting employers to solicit pledges 
that they will hire youths for the sum- 
mer as the second step. In a third 


phase, KATZ will offer prizes to in- 
dustrious teenagers who set up their 
own business during the summer 
months, said Mark Olds, KATZ vp and 
general manager. Prizes will include 
transistor radios, phonographs, and 
bicycles, and will serve as an incentive 
for the youngsters to create their own 
summer jobs. 



SEEKING SPINS FOR ‘SALVA- 
TION’: Promo men for Warner Bros.- 
Seven Arts Records were busy on both 
coasts recently, as they pushed the 
label’s new Bill Cosby album, “Hooray 
For The Salvation Army Band.” In 
top photo, Carl Deane (1.), east coast 
promo rep for Warner Bros. Seven 
Arts, presents Frank Costa, assistant 
music director for WMCA-New York, 
with a copy of the disk. Deane’s sweat- 
shirt advertises the Bill Cosby Special, 
to be aired on NBC-TV on March 18. 
In bottom photo, Clyde Bakkemo, Los 
Angeles promo man for Warner Bros.- 
Seven Arts, gives a copy to Miss 
KGFJ-Los Angeles, Carol King. Bak- 
kemo is wearing a Temple University 
sweatshirt. Bill Cosby is a noted Tem- 
ple U. alumnus. 

SPUTTERS: WCFL-Chicago VIP Bar- 
ney Pip will host an open house at the 
George and Anna Poi^s Cancer Pre- 
vention Center of Chicago from 10 
A.M. to 5 P.M. on Saturday, February 
10 . 

VITAL STATISTICS: Roger Wil- 
loughby-Ray has been appointed sta- 
tion manager of WEEP and WEEP- 
FM-Pittsburgh, following the resigna- 
tion of former manager J. Albert 
Dame who left to assume radio station 
ownership in State College, Pa. . . . 
Tom Cross, formerly production man- 
ager of KYAC-Seattle, has been 
named program director of the outlet. 
. . . Bal^tte Doniger Mandell has been 
designated manager of programming, 
promotion, and public affairs for 
WYIDD - FM/WKPA - AM-Pittsburgh. 
. . . Hal (Baby) Moore, former WHK- 
Cleveland deejay, is now WKYC-Cleve- 
land program director. . . . Rich Ger- 
maine, formerly program director at 
KFOG - San Francisco, has joined 
KGDN-Seattle as a broadcaster. 

Sunset Acquires 
Seven Masters 

LOS ANGELES — Simset Records, as 
part of its continuing expansion pro- 
gram, has reached a lease agreement 
with Crescendo Records for masters 
by Jimmy Reed, Jerry Butler, Dee 
Clark, and Betty Everett. 

According to the label’s general 
manager, Ed Barsky, Sunset has also 
recently acquired rights to masters by 
Damita Jo, Joe and Eddie, and Billy 
Strange. 


18 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 



UNI 55052 


\ 

• { 






CgghBoat Record RambUngs 


NEW YORK 


Big bash last week at the top of the 
Pan Am Building for such notables as 
Jimi Hendrix, the Animals, and the 
Eire Apparant. This gathering was 
marked by particularly good press 
coverage with network camera crews 
milling about, reps from most major 
magazines and newspapers, and still 
photographers hanging out all the 
seams. Michael Goldstein was host. 

Jack Elliot’s Reprise LP is finally 
out and is entitled, “Young Brigham.” 
That’s the name of Jack’s cow pony. 
One track, “912 Greens,” is a talky 
effort about Jack’s visiting Billy 


the mag with pictures and records to 
use as giveaways and prizes and the 
mag is running Rascals contests and 
the like. Plans are in the works for the 
Hullabaloo people to bind Rascals pos- 
ters into their mags. 

Irving Fields is at Caesar’s Palace. 
. . . Lou Rawls has been set to appear 
for a week beginning Feb. 27th at the 
Royal Box of the Americana in New 
York. While playing that date, Rawls 
will do the Ed Sullivan TV’er on 
March 3. 

The Children of God are being han- 
dled through the Connie DeNave office 
as far as pr goes. They are managed 
by High Mass Productions. 


score to “Hotel” deserved (but didn’t 
get) music branch Oscar acknowledg- 
ment, signed to London Records — deal 
calls for Keating to wax three albums 
during ’68 with two planned as entirely 
original comps. 

As a demonstration of what a top 
ten single and smash LP can do, for 
even an established act, Lettermen, 
according to manager Jess Rand, are 
booked solid through May of ’68. More 
than $150,000 in college concert offers 
had to be refused. 

Rudy Butterfield has exited local 
promo for RCA Victor and is now 
heading the promo staff at Record 
Merchandising, L.A.’s largest (and 


“Just Dropped In” by the First Edi- ^ 


tion (Reprise) and “So Many Lonely •«' 
Nights Ahead” by the Righteous Bros, h 
(Verve) in S.F., “Personality” by V, 
Mitch Ryder (Dynavoice) and “Soul A 
Serenade” by Willie Mitchell (Hi) in V 
Seattle, “Everything That Touches^ ^ 
You” by The Association (WB) and Mi 
“Love Power” by the Sandpebbles 
(Calla) in Portland, “Bottle of Wine” 
by the Fireballs (Atco) and “Tell 
Mama” by Etta James (Cadet) in 
San Diego and “Look, Here Comes the 
Sun” by the Sunshine Co. (Imperial) 
and “People World” by Jim and Jean. 
(Verve) in Los Angeles. ^ 

Dot publicity chief Norm Winter in- % 



Phluph 


Penny Candy 


Children of God 


Orpheus 


Joanna Moore 


Donovan 


Harle McNair 


Faier down in New Orleans. The album 
is good listening for folk-oriented 
fans. 

The Foundations’ deck on UNI, “Ba- 
by, Now That I’ve Found You,” con- 
tinues to climb the Top 100. It’s num- 
ber 9 with a bullet this week. 

There’s a Dick Corby produced deck 
just out on Philips. Title is “Airplane” 
and the group is Peter’s Pipers. . . . 
The Bunky & Jake LP is really begin- 
ning to move noiw. 

Lester Collins of E. B. Marks Mu- 
sic reports that the long “Yellow 
Daze” track on the Sinatra/Ellington 
LP is being personally edited by some 
program directors so that they can 
play it more often on their outlets. 

Pete Bennett called to suggest look- 
ing out for the new Evie Sands deck 
on Cameo and adds that it looks like 
a winner . . . more from Pete, “Try 
It” by the Ohio Express is getting 
strong airplay and plenty of good 
sales. 

If you are interested in realistic 
paintings, you might do well to stop 
at the ACA Gallery (63 E. 57th St.) 
to see the current show by Harry Mc- 
Cormick. The artist has spent most of 
the past year in Mexico, so many of 
the works have a south- of -the-border 
flavor. 

The Illusion goes into the Raleigh 
Hotel on Washington’s Birthday. The 
group is managed by Nola Leone in 
conjunction with Alan Slater’s New 
Beat firm. 

Barry Resnick is looking forward to 
health and happiness with “I Can’t 
Find The Time” by Orpheus and “At 
The Top Of The Stairs” by the For- 
mation. Chuck Tore bases his current 
plans for health and happiness on “A 
Million To One” by the Five Stair- 
steps. All three look good for Metro. 

Eddie Levine is back in town after 
being out on the road with the Hassles, 
Spencer Davis, and Traffic. 

Bee Gees took in approx. $67 thou- 
sand for two concerts last weekend 
in Anaheim, Calif. . . . Cream is com- 
ing over here for their first big Ameri- 
can tour, running from Feb. through 
May. They played scattered dates 
when last in this country . . . the Bee 
Gees will be back this summer for a 
tour of the U.S. Tentative date for the 
beginning of the tour is June. . . . 
Vanilla Fudge is set for an upcoming 
Johnny Carson TV’er. 

MGM is advancing the release date 
of “Phluph,” an album by the Boston- 
based group of the same name. The set 
was to have been issued in March but 
will be available early this month. 

Atlantic has entered into a joint 
promotion with Hullabaloo Mag on the 
Young Rascals. The label has supplied 


Screen Gems’ A1 Altman reports 
that Columbia is rushing a single of 
“Up On The Roof” out of the Cry an 
Shames LP as a result of exposure and 
response in Chicago. 

Pablo is handling light show chores 
at the Action House out on the island. 
The club is into something of a new 
thing and is featuring: Moby Grape 
(Jan. 26-27), the Candymen and Jere- 
my & the Sayters (Feb. 2-3), the 
Chambers Bros. (Feb. 16), H. P. Love- 
craft (Feb. 17), the James Gotten 
Blues Band (Feb. 9-10), Sly & the 
Family Stone (Mar. 1-2), and Charles 
Lloyd and the Ultimate Spinach 
(Mar. 8-9). 

Penny Candy is currently playing 
Harlow’s disko. The two week gig be- 
gan on Jan. 30th. 

One feature of Dominic Sicilia’s 
weekly radio gig over WHBI-FM is 
a live guest. Gary Stevens was recent- 
ly on the show and some more big 
names are set for the future. 

Crosbyana is an English publication 
that goes out to fans of Bing Crosby 
the world over. One recent issue con- 
tained more than a page of bio and 
reviews of Steve Mason, a singer who 
performs in the Crosby, Russ Columbo 
style on his own label, Mason Records. 
Such Mason LP endeavors as “The 
Crooner” and “Steve Mason Sings 
Crosby & Columbo” are given enthusi- 
astic send-offs. Mason’s style is de- 
scribed as a “rich baritone, a virile 
manly voice. Every word, every 
phrase, is crystal clear.” “The resem- 
blance to early Bing, at times, is 
frightening but pleasantly so,” is an- 
other point-of-view. 

MGM’s new group, Orpheus, was in 
NY last week to do spots on the Merv 
Griffin and Mike Douglas TV’ers. Or- 
pheus’ first MGM single, “Can’t Find 
The Time,” and album, titled simply 
“Orpheus,” are receivng good airplay 
in the Boston area. 


HOLLYWOOD 


It’s better than even money that 
Don Rickies and Woody Woodbury 
will be cutting capers for Warners-7 
Arts within the next few weeks. . . . 
The Gordian Knot already pacted to 
MGM — contract calls for one LP and 
four singles within the year. 

March ’68 edition of Who’s Who in 
America will list the Doors, Jefferson 
Airplane, Rolling Stones, Donovan, 
Country Joe and the Fish, Mamas and 
Papas, Monkees and Grateful Dead. 
Previously only two other pop artists 
received such recognition — the Beatles 
and Elvis Presley. Airplane, inci- 
dentally, in town cutting their follow- 
up LP to “After Bathing at Baxter’s.” 

Johnny Keating, whose soundtrack 


oldest) distrib. .Staff includes Russ 
Shaw, Julie Zimand, Jimmy Mack and 
Ed Runge. 

Teri Brown, former A&R asst, at 
Decca here, has joined Troika, Inc., 
a TV packaging, concert production 
and chain merchandising org. Corp. 
execs include Rafael Markowitz and 
Lee Wolfberg with offices at the Play- 
boy Bldg., 8560 Sunset in Hollywood. 

Glen Campbell set for his third ap- 
pearance on the Smothers Bros, show 
—their last of the season — on March 
3rd. More proof of the power of a 
chart disk — he replaces the pair this 
summer. 

Joe Price has resigned his P.R. post 
at Capitol — plans to free lance and 
“perhaps write another novel.” 

Last week’s “West Coast Girl” pho- 
to was, unforgivably, omitted from 
this page. She’s actress-composer-gui- 
tarist-sonstress and gorgeous Joanna 
Moore whose initial disk is Dunhill’s 
answer to Glen Campbell’s “By the 
Time I Get to Phoenix.” 

This week “West Coast Girl” is 
Harle McNair, a green-eyed blonde 
beauty now cutting for Toiwer. An ac- 
complished actress, dancer and singer 
(let’s not mention that she also paints, 
writes and is a contortionist — double 
jointed in eight places). Harle was 
born in Cinn., Ohio, but now calls 
Beverly Hills her home. 'She has man- 
aged to collect a carload of beauty 
titles — “Miss Hollywood Beach,” “Miss 
Photoigrapher’s Choice” and “Miss Ft. 
Lauderdale Beach.” Initial Tower 
single, getting almost hourly play on 
KMPC in town, is titled “Stone Me 
One Time Gently.” 

Roy Kohn, handling the Library of 
Recorded iSound for Southern Music, 
has switched his base from N.Y. to 
L.A. Wife Andra Willis is a regular 
en-chanteuse on the Lawrence Welk 
TV’er. 

Sally Anders is the new sales pub- 
lic relation exec for the Continental, 
the music biz hotel. It’s now owned 
by the Hyatt House chain and, accord- 
ing to Anders, is installing color TV 
in all rooms. (You can also purchase 
CB at the newsstand in the lobby. 

Former Phillips promo head, Mike 
Borchetta, has formed his own record 
promo and publicity firm — offices at 
1610 N. Argyle Ave. in Hollywood. 

Former KRLA PD Herb Heiman 
named “Man of the Year” by Ohio 
State — billed more than $2,000,000 in 
life insurance policies in ’67. (But still 
can’t pick a hit.) 

RCA Victor’s the Youngbloods 
booked into the Whisky A-Go-Go Feb. 
8-llth. Current single, a bust-out 
in S.F., is titled “Quicksand.” 

Others Popping Along the Pacific: 


sists he phoned 20th Century-Fox for 
a print of “Dr. Dolittle” to show to^l 
friends at his home last Saturday 
night — ^was informed “We’re sorry but 
the doctor doesn’t make house calls.” 


CHICAGO 


and radio station 
experience” last 


- 


I 


20 


Verve Records 

WCFL hosted an "experience" last a 
Thursday to toast The Velvet Under-.^^^ 
ground and their new “above ground” ^ 
sound as showcased in latest Verve . 
album “White Light, White Heat.” » 
Metro Record iDist.’s Jack Katz JL 
kicked off the “cocktail press trip” at 
The Bratskeller in Old Town and pro- 
ceeded to the Aardvark Cinematheque 
where Ron Britain (WCFL) emceed 
the doings! . . . Congrats to NATRA 
prexy E. Rodney Jones and WVON 
p.d. Lucky Cordell on their selectioru 
as top deejay and program director, 
respectively, at the recent Bill Gavin 
conference in Las Vegas . . . New 
staffer at Summit Dist. is Bud Steb- 
bins who took over as promo rep in 
this area following Tom Amann’s de- 
parture for Cincinnati. Ton will be 
working for Liberty out there . . . 
Allstate’s Cy Gold is concentrating on 
Cadet albums “Up Pops Ramsey 
Lewis,” “Tell Mama” by Etta James 
and “Ode To 52nd Street” by Kenny 
Burrell . . . Ultimate Spinach (MGM) 
will be appearing at The Cellar 2/15 
thru 24 . . . The Club spotlights At- 
lantic’s Brother Jack McDuff starting 
2/29 . . . We hear that Josh Adams fcl | 
has a possible two-sider in “You Grow^ 

On Me” b/w “Barnyard And Burlap” 
on the Worchester label . . . Arthur ^ 1 
Prysock has been booked into Mister ; 
Kelly’s for two weeks, opening 2/19 . . . , . 

London’s Sam Cerami gave us a call ’ ' 

to tout the new Moody Blues single 
“Knights In White iSatin” . . . With ► 
Dot’s Erwin Barg the big ones to 

watch are “Mission Impossible” by 

Lalo Shifrin, “Cab Driver” by the 
Mills Bros, and “Atlanta Georgia 
Stray” by Sonny Curtis . . . Chris ^ 
Lane, 1965 recipient of the Bill Gawin ^ 
“Man Of The Year” award, announced 
his plans to become a programming 
consultant. Lane recently resigned his 
post as operations manager of WJJD- 
Chicago . . . Sheila McRae followecV' 
Louis Prima into the Empire Room . . . 
From Ed Duncan of Universal Record- 
ing Corp. comes word that the Ameri- 
can Breed’s “Bend Me Shape Me” 
(which was cut at Universal) has 
topped the million mark in sales and 
that the group will receive their RIAA ^ 
certified gold record on the 2/12 Joey 
Bishop show! . . . Decca’s Frank Scar-^ — 
dino notes increased airplay in these ^ 
parts on the current Brenda Lee offer- 
ing “That’s Alright.” _ 










Cash Box — February 10, ^ ft 



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Cash Box — February 10, 1968 



VICTOR 



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PROM SWEDEN 

Saile from ”Sjsyp!icis'‘— HsjJirfoW 

Vi>ya^!e to Ameries— fewdierj 

Siufcinie fspricieure — Btrmid 

Antal Dorati /Stockholm Philliariiiotite Orahestra 



VIC/VICS‘1319 




VIC/VICS-1320(e) 


VIC/VICS-1317 


CAL/CAS-2196 


Hamilton IV 


m 


CAL/CAS-2200 


J, S. BACH 

Sdeeitms frm THE MUSICAL NOTEBOOK 
FOR ANNA MAGDALENA 

&slavi«^ar4t,a«r(«H*sni \t@ 

Ra^Maitin lide, Smttm 

Y)^ Ai QuAt Celt, Paikiw On M aa^ 


LOTTE 

LEHMAMH V~ 


BfiUUiMS/WOn S»N6S 




















WE GOOFED ! ! 

“DRIFTING” 

b/w ’ 

“IF ydoIad 
MY MIND” 

BOBBY BLAND 

DUKE 432 

★★★★★★★★★ 

“PIECE OF GOLD” 

b/w 

“HONEY CHILD” 

BOBBY BLAND 

DUKE 433 

★★★★★★★★★ 

“WHAT HAPPENED 
TODS” 

b/w 

“GROUND HOG” 

CLARENCE GREEN 
AND THE 
RHYTHMAIRES 

DUKE 424 

★★★★★★★★★ 

DUKE/PEACOCK RECORDS, INC. 
G; 2809 Erastus Street 

// Houston, Texas 
fc. OR 3-2611 


Righteous Brothers Break 
For fncUviclual Careers 

NEW YORK — Bobby Hatfield and Bill 
Medley have disclosed that after six 
years as the Righteous Brothers they 
will amicably part company to pursue 
separate careers. 

Hatfield will be featured with the 
new Righteous team with Jimmy 
Walker replacing Medley as agreed by 
both original members. Walker was 
formerly with the Knickerbockers 
group. Hatfield and Walker have just 
begun the first leg of a 60-city college 
and concert tour. In addition, Hatfield 
will head Righteous Enterprises, a 
talent and production outfit. 

Medley has stated that one of the 
main reasons he is leaving the team 
is to have more time for creative work 
in the writing field (both musical and 
dramatic). He has formed Orange 
Grove Music for Medley Productions 
in Santa Ana, Calif. 

Medley will continue his perform- 
ing career though as a single artist. 
First booking on a solo basis is with 
Jack Benny at the Circle Star Theatre 
in early March. He will also expand 
activities in the straight acting field. 


Labels Gear For 
"80 Days' Reviyal 

NEW YORK — The return of the film 
version of “Around the World in 80 
Days” has sparked new interest in 
recordings of the famed soundtrack 
by Victor Young. Decca Records is re- 
releasing its track LP (an RIAA gold 
record), while Capitol is offering disk- 
ings by Frank Sinatra and Nat Cole. 
Kapp Records expects an “80 Days” 
LP to be marketed at the end of this 
month. Music from the score has sold 
some 25 million disks from over 300 
different versions. 


NOTICE 


T o All Advertisers 


Because of the Washington 
Birthday Holiday, Thursday 
Feb. 22, the Deadline for Ads 
will be Wednesday, Feb. 21. 



Ted Shapiro To ABC 
As Admn. Assistant 

NEW YORK — Ted Shapiro has been 
named to fill the newly created posi- 
tion of administrative assistant for 
the entire ABC Records organization. 
Reporting directly to Larry Newton, 
president of the diskery, Shapiro be- 
gins his duties Feb. 5th. 

Involved in administration for all 
departments of the ABC operation, 
Shapiro plans to place most of his 
emphasis in the fields of finance and 
efficiency. 

Shapiro has most recently been as- 
sistant treasurer and general mana- 
ger of the international division of 
Kapp Records. He was with Kapp for 
9 years. 



Ted Shapiro 


Special Homecoming Set 
For Aretha In Detroit 

NEW YORK — Special festivities have 
been planned for the gala “Homecom- 
ing Concert” planned in Detroit for 
Aretha Franklin. 

The return special to be held at the 
Cobo Hall on Feb. 16 will be high- 
lighted by presentation of awards by 
each of the trade papers, NATRA, and 
the Bill Gavin Organization. 

Since last year began. Miss Frank- 
lin has earned gold records for three 
singles and an album in 1967 and one 
for “Chain of Fools” this year. 


Manning Exits Col. 

For Indie Promo Co. 

NEW YORK — Mitch Manning has left 
his post as regional (Northeast) sales 
and promo manager for the Date, 
Ode and Immediate labels distributed 
through Columbia Records, to enter 
indie promo and artist publicity. With 
Columbia for the past six years, Man- 
ning will continue to cover the North- 
east, operating out of 1619 Broadway. 

Manning’s operation will concen- 
trate on promoting “consumer aware- 
ness” of product he represents. In ad- 
dition to airplay promo, he’ll Avork 
with dealers, distribs, racks and one- 
stops to achieve this aim. 




Ratner Joins Uni 


HOLLYWOOD — Uni Records has a 
new A&R producer — Norm Ratner, it 
was announced last week by Russ 
Regan, Uni’s executive administrator. 
Ratner will be buying masters and 
developing new talent for Uni. ^ 

25-year-old Ratner began his career 
ten years ago as a singer and song 
writer for Imperial Records. After a 
hitch in the Coast Guard, he formed 
a partnership with Pat Boone and pro- 
duced the Leaves’ chart entry, “Hey 
Joe.” For Mira Records, he produced 
the Forum’s “The River is Wide.” 
Before joining UNI, he was profes-, 
sional manager of Dunhill Records’ 
publishing arm, Trousdale Music 
(BMI). 




t 


♦»J 


k 


Dot Pacts Troxel 


♦Ho 






HOLLYWOOD — Dot Records has j 
signed Gary Troxel, former member 3 
of the Fleetwoods recording group, to d 
an exclusive long term contract, ac- ^ 
cording to Dick Peirce, vice president 
and general manager of the label. 

As one-third of the Fleetwoods, lead 
singer Troxel enjoyed a large follow- 
ing as the only male member of the 
trio. The Fleetwoods were responsible ^^ y 
for the sale of several million-selling 
singles, including “Come Softly To 
Me,” and “Mr. Blue.” In addition to 
their success in the single field, the 
group has some eight albums to their 
credit. 

Initial Gary Troxel sessions for Dot 
are nearing completion, with debut 
disk, “The Things I Didn’t Say,” m 
scheduled for release later this month.jeJW 






4 


Impulse Re-Inks Shepp 


■MMi 


NEW YORK — Noted avante guard 
saxophonist Archie Shepp has renewed 
his long term contract with Impulse 
Records, according to an announce- 
ment by Bob Thiele, director of A&R - 
for ABC Records, parent of the jazz 
label. 

Shepp has just returned from an 
extended European tour on which he 
enjoyed great success, particularly in 
London. He is currently recording a 
new Impulse LP, his seventh, entitled 
“The Magic Of Ju Ju.” ^ 

Shepp signed with Impulse in De- 
cember 1964. 


,4. 




>1 

'i 



24 





Chart Buster Prescription 


(The Medicine 




UNEIIP 


MUSIC ENTERPRISES, INC 
DALLAS, TEXAS 


A PRODUCT OF ABNAK MUSIC ENTERPRISES. INC. 


FOR BOOKINGS CONTACT: 
BANKERS MANAGEMENT 
AND SERVICES, INC. 
825 OLIVE / Rl 2-6111 
DALLAS, TEXAS 75201 
CALL COLLECT 


Foreign licensees contact: Publishers’ Licensing Corporation, 40 West 55th Street, New York 10019 (212) 581-7970 





Vital Siatisti^s 

DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT TITLES ON THE CASH BOX TOP 100 THIS WEEK 


* New To The Top 100 


#1 

LOVE IS BLUE (L’AMOUR EST BLEU) (2:31) 
Paul Mauriat-Philips 40495 
35 E Wacker Drive, Chicago, III. 

PUB; Croma ASCAP 37 W. 57 St., NYC. 
WRITERS: A. Popp-P. Cour-Blackburn 
ARR: P. Mauriat . , ^ , 

FLIP: Alone In The World (Seuls Au Monde) 


#2 

GREEN TAMBOURINE (2:22) Lemon Pipers-Buddah 23 
1650 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Paul Leka (c/o Buddah) 

PUB: Kama Sutra BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: P. Leka-S. Pinz ^ „ 

ARR: Paul Leka FLIP: No Help From Me 


#10 

MY BABY MUST BE A MAGICIAN (2:31) 

Marvelettes-Tamla 541S8 

2648 W. Grand Blvd, Detroit, Michigan. 

PROD: Smokey Robinson c/o Tamla 
PUB; Jobete BMI (same address) 

WRITER: William Robinson FLIP: I Need Someone 

#11 

SUSAN (2:48) Buckinghams-Columbia 44378 
51 West 52nd Street, NYC. 

PROD: James William Guercio 

151 El Camino Dr., Beverly Hills, Cal. 

PUB; Bag 0 Tunes BMI c/o Richard Shelton 
79 West Monroe Street, Chicago, III. 

Diogens BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: Holvay, Beisbier & Guercio 
ARR: J. W. Guercio FLIP: Foreign Policy 


#20 

WE CAN FLY (2:13) The Cowsills-MGM 13886 
1350 Ave of the Americas, NYC. 

PROD; Dill & Bob Cowsill c/o Akbestal 
PUB; Akbestal BMI 888 8th Ave, NYC. 

WRITERS. Bill & Bob Cowsill-A Kornfield-S. Duboff 
ARR: Artie Schroeck FLIP: A Time For Remembrance 

#21 

TO GIVE (THE REASON I LIVE) (3:16) 

Frankie Valli-Philips 40510 
no West 57th Street, NYC. 

PROD: Bob Crewe 1841 Bway, NYC 
PUB: Saturday BMI, c/o Bob Crewe 
Seasons Four BMI 1501 Bway, NYC. 

WRITERS: Bob Crewe, Bob Gaudio 

ARR; Chas. Calello 

FLIP; Watch Where You Walk 


#3 

JODY IN DISGUISE (2:47) 

John Fred & His Playboy Band-Paula 282 
728 Texas, Shreveport, La. 

PROD; John Fred, Abe Bernard 
236 Eugene St., Baton Rouge, La. 

PUB- Su Ma BMI (same address as Paula) 

WRITERS: J. Fred-A. Bernard 

ARR: A. Bernard FLIP: When The Lights Go Out 


#4 

SPOOKY (2:59) Classics IV-Imperlal 66259 
6920 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 
PROD; Buddy Buie c/o Bill Lowery 
P.O. Box 9687 N Atlanta, Georgia. 

PUB: Bill Lowery BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: Sharpe-Middlebrook 

ARR: Buie-Cobb FLIP: Poor People 

#9 

I WISH IT WOULD RAIN (2:51) 

The Temptations-Gordy 7068 
2648 W. Grand Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

PROD: Norman Whitfield c/o Gordy 
PUB: Jobette BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: Whitfield-Strong-Penzabene 
FLIP: I Truly, Truly Believe 


#12 

A DIFFERENT DRUM (2:38) 

Stone Poneys-Capitol 2004 
1750 N. Vine, H’wood, Cal. 

PROD: Nick Venet (same address) 

PUB: Screen Gems, Col. BMI 711 5th Av., NYC. 
WRITER: Mike Nesmith FLIP: I’ve Got To Know 

#13 

SHE’S A RAINBOW (2:48) 

The Rolling Stones-London 906 

539 West 25 St., NYC 

PROD: Rolling Stones 

c/o Allen Klein, Warwick Hotel, NYC 

PUB: Gideon BMI c/o Allen Klein 

WRITERS: Jagger-Richard 

ARR; Rolling Stones 

FLIP: 2000 Light Years From Home 

#14 

JUST AS MUCH AS EVER (2:20) 

Bobby Vinton-Epic 10266 

51 W. 52nd St., NYC 

PROD: Billy Sherrill c/o Epic Records 

PUB: Roosevelt BMI, 1650 B’way, NYC 

WRITERS: C. Singleton-L. Coleman 

FLIP: Another Memory 


#22 

I WONDER WHAT SHE’S DOING TONIGHT (2:38) 
Tommy Boyce 8i Bobby Hart-A&M 893 

1416 La Brea, Hollywood, Calif. 

PROD; Boyce 8i Hart c/o A&M 

PUB; Screen Gems Columbia BMI, 711 5th Ave, NYC. 

WRITERS: Boyce & Hart 

ARR: Artie Butler FLIP: Ambushers 

#23 

CHAIN OF FOOLS (2:45) 

Aretha Franklln-Atlantic 2464 
1841 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Jerry Wexler (Atlantic) 

PUB; 14th Hour-BMI 1721 Field, Det., Mich. 
Pronto-BMI 1841 Broadway, NYC. 

WRITER: Don Covay FLIP: Prove It 

#24 

SKIP A ROPE (2:38) 

Henson Cargill-Monument 1041 

530 W. Main St., Hendersonville, Tenn. 

PROD: Don Law, 2016 Terrace Pa, Nashville, Tenn. 
PUB; Tree BMI 905 16th Ave S., Nashville, Tenn. 
WRITERS: Jack Moran, Glenn D. Tubb 
FLIP: A Very Well Traveled Man 

#25 


#6 

NOBODY BUT ME (2:11) Human Beinz-Capitol 5990 
1750 N. Vine, H’wood, Cal. 

PROD: Alex Deazevedo c/o Capitol 
PUB; Wemar BMI, 1619 B’way, NYC 
WRITER: R. Ilsey FLIP: Sueno 

#7 

BEND ME SHAPE ME (2:05) 

American Breed-Acta 811 
6565 Sunset Blvd., H’wood, Calif. 

PROD: Bill Traut for Dunwlch Prod. 

25 E. Chestnut, Chicago, III. 

PUB: Helios BMI 1619 Bway, NYC. 

WRITERS: English-Weiss 

ARR: Bill Traut-E. Higgins FLIP: Mindrocker 


#8 

GOIN’ OUT OF MY HEAD/ 

CANT TAKE MY EYES OFF YOU (2:55) 

Lettermen-Capitol 2054 

1750 N. Vine, Hollywood, Calif. 

PROD; Kelly Gordon c/o Capitol 
PUB; Saturday BMI-1841 Bway, NYC. 

& Seasons Four BMI-1501 Bway, NYC. 

(Can’t Take My Eyes Off You) 

Vogue BMI-2449 Wilshire Blvd 
Santa Monica, Calif. (Coin’ Out Of My Head) 
WRITERS; Ted Randazzo & Bobby Weinstein 
(Coin’ Out Of My Head) 

Bob Crewe & Bob Gaudio (Can’t Take My 
Eyes Off You) 

ARR: Perry Botkin Jr. FLIP: I Believe 


#9 

BABY, NOW THAT I’VE FOUND YOU (2:36) 
Foundations-UNI 55038 
8255 Sunset Blvd. L.A. Calif. 

PROD: Tony Macaulay c/o Pye Records 
Cumberland Place, W1 England. 

PUB: January BMl-25 W. 56 St. NYC. 
Welbeck BMI-139 Piccadily 
London Wl, England 
WRITERS: J. Macleod-T. Macaulay 
FLIP: Come On Back To Me 


#15 

ITCHYCOO PARK (2:45)-Small Faces-lmmediate 501 
51 West 52 St., NYC 
PROD; Steve Marriott, Ronnie Lane 
c/o Immediate Rec. Co. Ltd. 

63-69 New Oxford St., London Wl, Eng. 

PUB: Nice Songs BMI c/o Sterling Gilmore & Co. 
15300 Ventura Blvd., Sherman Oaks, Cal. 

WRITERS: Marriott, Lane-FLIP; I’m Only Dreaming 

#16 

TOMORROW (2:14) 

Strawberry Alarm Clock-UNI 55046 
8255 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, Cal. 

PROD: Frank Slay-Bill Holmes 
6362 H’wood Blvd., H’wood, Calif. 

PUB; Alarm Clock ASCAP 

2854 Paraiso Way, La Crescenta, Calif. 

WRITERS: M. Weitz-E. King 
FLIP: Birds In My Tree 

#17 

BOTTLE OF WINE (2:08) 

Fire Balls-Atco 6491 
1841 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Norman Petty, Clovis, New Mexico 
PUB: Deep Fork ASCAP 15 E. 48 St., NYC. 

WRITER: Tom Paxton 

FLIP: Can’t You See I’m Tryin’ 

#18 

DARLIN’ (2:11) Beach Boys-Capitol 2068 

1750 N. Vine, Hollywood, Calif. 

PROD: Beach Boys c/o Capitol 
PUB; Sea of Tunes BMI 
9042 La Alba, Whittier, Calif. 

WRITERS: Brian Wilson, Mike Love 
FLIP: Here Today 

#19 

SUNDAY MORNIN’ (3:00) 

Spanky & Our Gang-Mercury 72765 
110 West 57 Street, NYC. 

PROD: Scharf-Dorough 265 W. 20 St., NYC. 

PUB; Blackwood BMI 1650 Bway, NYC. 

WRITER: M. Guryan 
I ARR: Scharf-Dorough FLIP: Echoes 



WOMAN, WOMAN (3:12)-Union Gap-Columbia 44297 

51 W. 52 St., NYC 

PROD: Jerry Fuller c/o Columbia 

6121 Sunset Blvd., L.A., Cal. 

PUB: Glaser BMI-801 16 Av S., Nashville, Tenn. 

WRITERS: J. Glazer, J. Payne 

ARR: Al Capps-FLIP: Don’t Make Promises 

#26 

I CAN TAKE OR LEAVE YOUR LOVING (2:30) 
Herman’s Hermits-MGM 13685 
1350 Ave of the Americas, NYC. 

PROD: Mickie Most, 101 Dean St, London, Eng. 

PUB: Miller Music ASCAP 

1350 Ave of the Americas, NYC. 

WRITER: R Jones FLIP: Marcel’s 

#27 

WE’RE A WINNER (2:15) Impressions-ABC 11022 
1330 Ave of the Americas, NYC. 

PROD: Johnny Pate c/o ABC 
PUD: Camad Music, BMI 
79 W Monroe St. Chicago, III. 

WRITER: C. Mayfield 

ARR: Johnny Pate FLIP; It’s All Over 

#28 

WORDS (3:13) Bee Gees Atco 6548 
1841 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Robert Stigwood 
Argyle St., London W.l. Eng. 

Bee Gees c/o Robert Stigwood 

PUB: Nemperor BMI 221 W. 57 St NYC. 

WRITERS: B. Gibb-R. Gibb-M. Gibb 
ARR: Bill Shepherd FLIP: Sinking Ships 

#29 

THE DOCK OF THE BAY (2:38) 

Otis Redding-Volt 157 
1841 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Steve Cropper c/o Volt 
PUB: East BMI 926 E. McLemore Ave., Memphis, 
Tenn. Time BMI 449 S. Beverly Dr., Bev. Hills, Calif. 
Redwal BMI 535 Cotton Ave., Macon, Georgia. 
WRITERS: Cropper-Redding FLIP: Sweet Lorene 

#30 

YOU (2:25) Marvin Gaye-Tamla 54160 
2648 W. Grand Blvd., Detroit Mich. 

PROD: I Hunter c/o Tamla 
PUB: Jobette BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: Hunter-Goga-Bowen 
FLIP: Change What You Can 

#31 

EVERYTHING THAT TOUCHES YOU (3:17) 
Association-Warner Bros. 7163 

4000 Warner Blvd., Burbank, Calif. 

PROD: Bones Howe 

4447 Cromwell Ave., L.A. Calif. 

PUB: Beechwood EMI 1750 N. Vine, L.A., Calif. 
WRITER: Terry Kirkman FLIP: We Love Us 

#32 

SIMON SAYS (2:19) 

1910 Fruit Company-Buddah 24 

1650 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Super K 200 W. 57 St., NYC 
PUB; Kas Kat BMI 
200 W. 57 St. NYC. 

WRITER: E. Chiprut 

FLIP: Reflections From The Looking Glass 
#33 

TELL MAMA (2:20)-Etta James-Cadet 5578 
320 E. 21st St. Chicago. III. 

PROD: Rick Hall, c/o Fame Rec. Studio 
Muscle Shoals, Ala. 

PUB: Fame BMI-(same address) 

WRITER: Clarence Carter-ARR: Rick Hall & Staff 
FLIP; I’d Rather Go Blind 

#34 

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE (2:30) 

Jay & The Techniques-Smash 2142 
110 West 57 St, NYC. 

PROD: Jerry Ross c/o Smash 
PUB: Patrick B adley B-MI 
520 East 81 Street, NYC. 

WRITER: M. Irby ARR; Joe Renzetti 
FLIP: Still (In Lo;e With You) 


#35 

AM I THAT EASY TO FORGET (3:05) 

Engelbert Humperdinck-Parrot 40023 
539 West 25th Street, NYC. 

PROD: Peter Sullivan 
A I.R., 101 Baker St, London W.l. Eng. 

PUB: 4 Star BMI 

9220 Sunset Blvd, L.A. Calif. 

WRITERS: Belew-Stevenson 
FLIP: Pretty Ribbons 

#36 

I THANK YOU (2:40) Sam & Dave-Stax 242 
1841 Broadway, NYG. 

PROD; Isaac Hayes & David Porter c/o Stax 
PUB: East BMI 926 E. McLemore Av., Memphis, Tenn. 
Pronto BMI 1841 Broadway, NYC. 

WRITERS: Isaac Hayes-David Porter 
FLIP: Wrap It Up 

#37 

IF I COULD BUILD MY WHOLE WORLD AROUND 
YOU (2:21) 

Marvin Gaye 8i Tammi Terrell-Tamla 54161 
2648 W. Grand Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

PROD: Fuqua & Bristol c/o Tamla 
PUB: Jobete BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: Fuqua, Bristol & Bullock 
FLIP: If This World Were Mine 

#38 

VALLEY OF THE DOLLS (3:35) 

Dionne Warwick-Scepter 12203 
254 West 54 Street NYC. 

PROD: Bacharach-David 
15 East 48 Street NYC. 

PUB: Leo Feist ASCAP 

1350 Ave of the Americas, NYC. 

WRITERS: Andre Previn-Dory Previn 
ARR: Pat Williams 
FLIP: Say A Little Prayer 

#39 

HELLO GOODBYE (3:24) BeaUes-Capitol 2056 
1750 N. Vine, Hollywood, Calif. 

PROD: George Martin c/o A.I.R. London, 

101 Baker St., London, W.2. Eng. 

WRITERS: Lennon & McCartney 
FLIP: I’m A Walrus 

#40 

I HEARD IT THRU THE GRAPEVINE (2:53) 

Gladys Knight & The Pips-Soul 35039 
2648 W. Grand Blvd., Detroit Mich. 

PROD: N. Whitfield c/o Soul 
PUB; Jobete BMI-address above 
WRITERS: Whitfield-Strong 
FLIP: It’s Time To Go Now 

#41 

WALK AWAY RENEE (2:42) 

FOUR TOPS-Motown 1119 

2648 W. Grand Blvd. Detroit, Mich. 

PROD: Holland-Dozier c/o Motown 
PUB: Twin Tone BMI 200 W. 57 St NYC. 

WRITERS: Brown-Calilli-Sansone 
FLIP: Your Love Is Wonderful 

#42 

SOME VELVET MORNING (3:45) 

Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazlewood-Reprise 0651 

3701 Warner Blvd., Burbank, Calif. 

PROD: Lee Hazlewood c/o Marty Machet 
1501 Broadway, NYC. 

PUB: Lee Hazlewood ASCAP 

WRITER: L. Hazlewood 

ARR; Billy Strange FLIP: Old Lonesome Me 

#43 

LOVE POWER (2:10)-Sandpebbles-Calla 141 
1631 B’way, New York, N. Y. 

PROD: Teddy Vann, 1619 B’way, NYC 

WRITERS: C. White, T. Vann 

ARR: Sammy Lowe-FLIP: Because Of Love 

#44 

THERE IS (3:12) 

The Oells-Cadet 5574 
320 E. 21 St, Chicago, III. 

PROD: B Miller c/o Cadet 
PUB; Chevis BMI c/o Cadet 
WRITERS: R. Miner-B. Miller 
ARR: C. Stepney FLIP: 0-0 I Love You 

#45 

MONEY (2:01) Lovin’ Spoonful-Kama Sutra 241 

1350 Ave. of the Americas, NYC. 

PROD: Joe Wissert-Lovin’ Spoonful 
c/o Koppleman-Rubin 1650 Bway. NYC. 

PUB: Faithful Virtue BMI 1650 Bway. NYC. 
WRITER: J. Sebastian FLIP: Close Your Eyes 

#46 

THERE WAS A TIME (3:35) 

James Brown-King 6144 
1540 Brewster Ave, Cinn, Ohio. 

PROD: James Brown (same address) 

PUB; Golo BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: J. Brown-M Hobgood 

ARR; J. Brown FLIP: I Can’t Stand Myself 

#47 

NEW ORLEANS (2:24) Neil Diamond-Bang 554 
1650 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Jeff Barry-EIlie Greenwich 
1414 Ave. of the Americas, NYC. 

PUB: Rock Masters BMI 
177 Route 304, New City, NY. 

WRITERS: Royster-Guida FLIP; Hanky Panky 

#48 

OH HOW IT HURTS (2:49) 

Barbara Mason-Arctic 137 

c/o Jamie/Guyden, 919 N. Broad, Phila , Pa. 

PROD; Jimmy Bishop (same address) 

PUB: Blockbuster BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: B. Mason-B. Brummer 
ARR: Bobby Martin 
FLIP; Ain’t Got Nobody 

#49 

BORN FREE (2:37) Hesitations-Kapp 878 
136 East 57 Street NYC. 

PROD: GWP 150 E 52 St., NYC. 

PUB: Screen Gems/Columbia BMI 
711 5th Ave, NYC. 

WRITERS: Black-Berry 
ARR; Teacho Wiltshire 
FLIP; Love Is Everywhere 

#50 

BACK UP TRAIN (2:17)-AI Greene-Hot Line 15000 

c/o Bell, 1776 B’way NYC 

PROD: A. Rodgers-c /0 James Production (Bell) 

PUB: Tosted-BMI 

1315 Cass St. S.E., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

WRITERS: Palmer James-Curtis Rodgers 
FLIP; Don’t Leave Me 


26 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 



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LIBERTY BELLE 
GIVES YOU 
THE HOTTEST 
OF THE HOT! 


Vitai SiaiisiMSs 


DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT TITLES ON THE CASH BOX TOP 100 THIS WEEK 


* New To The Top 100 


#51 

GUITAR MAN (2:15) 

Elvis Presley-RCA 9425 
155 East 24th Street, NYC. 

PUB: Vector BMl 

823 Cammack Court, Nashville, Tenn. 
WRITER: Reed FLIP: Hi-Heel Sneakers 


#52 

THE LESSON (2:28) Vikki Carr-Liborty 56012 
6920 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

PROD: Sammy Oliver c/o Liberty 

PUB: Alto ASCAP 621 N. Alta Dr, Bev. Hills, Cal. 
WRITER: Mack David ^ , 

ARR: Sid Feller FLIP: One More Mountain 


#53 

GET OUT NOW (2:08) 

Tommy James & The Shondells-Roulette 7000 
1631 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Big Kahoona (same address) 

PUB: Patricia BMl (same address) 

WRITERS: R. Cordell-B. Gentry 
ARR: Calvert-Gentry-Cordeii-Wisner 
FLIP: Wish It Were You 


#54 

SKINNY LEGS AND ALL (3:10)-Joe Tex-Dial 4063 
1841 B'way, N.Y., N.Y. . 

PROD: Buddy Killen c/o Treo Music 
PUB: Tree BMI-905 16th Ave. S, Nashville, Tenn. 
WRITER: Joe Tex . „ . x 

FLIP: Watch The One (That Brings The Bad News) 


#55 * 

THE END OF OUR ROAD (2:19) 

Gladys Knight & Pips-Soul 35042 
2648 W. Grand Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

PROD: N. Whitfield c/o Soul 
PUB: Jobete BMl (same address) 

WRITERS: Whitfield-Strong-Penzabene 
FLIP: Don’t Let Her Take Your Love From You 


#56 

TWO LITTLE KIDS (2:36) Date 1586 
51 West 52nd Street, NYC. 

PROD: David Kapralik c/o Date 
Ken Williams c/o Date 
PUB: Jalynne BMl 
2203 Spruce St, Phila, Pa. 

WRITERS: E. Recold-C. Davis-B. Acklin 
ARR: Burt Keyes 

FLIP: We’ve Got To Love One Another 


#57 

NO SAD SONGS (2:18) 

Joe Simon-Sound Stage 7-2602 

530 W. Main St, Hendersonville, Tenn. 

PROD; J. R. Enterprises c/o Sound Stage 7 
PUB: Press BMl 905 16th Ave S., Nashville, Tenn 
WRITER: D. Carter ARR: Chips Moman 
FLIP: Come On And Get It 


#58 

ZABADAK (3:40) 

Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich 

Imperial 66270 

6920 Sunset Blvd., H’wood, Calif. 

PROD: Steve Rowlands 

c/o Philips Ltd., Stanhope PI., London, Eng. 

PUB: Al GalliCO BMl, 101 W 55 St., NYC. 

WRITER: Howard Blaikley FLIP: The Sun Goes Down 


#59 

CARMEN (3:39) 

Herb Alpert & Tijuana Brass-A&M 890 
1416 La Brea, Hollywood, Calif. 

PROD: Herb Alpert c/o A&M 
PUB: Irving BMl (same address) 

WRITERS: P.D. 

ARR: H. Alpert-Peter Matz FLIP: Love So Fine 


#80 * 

MEN ARE GETTIN’ SCARCE (3:14) 

Joe Tex-Dial 4069 
1841 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Buddy Killen c/o Dial 
PUB: Tree BMl 

905 16th Ave. S., Nashville, Tenn. 
WRITER: Joe Tex 

FLIP; You’re Gonna Thank Me, Woman 


#61 

I SECOND THAT EMOTION (2:39) 

Smokey Robinson 8i Miracles-Tamla 54149 
2648 W. Grand Blvd., Det, Mich. 

PROD: Smokey Robinson & A. Cleveland (Tamla) 
PUB; Jobete BMl (same address) 

WRITERS: Robinson, Cleveland 
FLIP: You Must Be Love 

#62 

DO UNTO ME (2:33) 

James & Bobby Purify-Bell 700 

1776 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Papa Don Schroeder 
3520 Rothschild Dr. Pensacola, Fla. 

PUB: Big 7 BMl 1631 Bway, NYC. 

WRITERS: M. Levey-G lllingworth-R. Grasso 
FLIP: Everybody Needs Somebody 

#63 

MONTEREY (4:21) 

Eric Burden & The Animals-MGM 13868 
1350 Ave. of the Americas, NYC 
PROD: Tom Wilson c/o MGM 
PUB: Slamina BMl 1619 Bway, NYC. 

Sea Lark BMl 25 West 56th St., NYC. 

WRITERS: Burdon-Briggs-Weider- 

Jenkins-McCulloch 

FLIP: Ain't That So. 

#64 

MALAYISHA (2:32) 

Miriam Makeba-Reprise 0654 
4000 Warner Blvd., Burbank, Calif. 

PROD: Jerry Ragovoy 219 W 79 St., NYC. 

PUB: Raj Kumar BMl 250 W 57 St., NYC. 
WRITERS: Makeba-Ragovoy ARR: Jimmy Wisner 
FLIP: Ring Beil Ring Bell 

#65 

CARPET MAN (2:48) 

5th Dimension-Soul City 762 
6920 Sunset Blvd., H’wood, Calif. 

PROD; Bones Howe 

4447 Cromwell Ave., L.A., Calif. 

PUB: Johnny Rivers BMl 

6920 Sunset Blvd., H’wood, Calif. 

WRITER: Jim Webb ARR: Jim Webb 
FLIP: Magic Garden 

#66 

SUNSHINE OF YOUR LOVE (3:03) 

The Cream-Atco 6544 
1841 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Felix Pappaldri c/o Atco 
PUB: Dratleaf BMl 130 W. 57 St., NYC. 
WRITERS: J. Bruce-P. Brown-E. Clapton 
FLIP: Swiabr 

#67 

HEY LITTLE ONE (2:27) 

Glen Campbell-Capitol 2076 
1750 N. Vine, Hollywood, Calif. 

PROD: Al DeLory c/o Capitol 
PUB: Sherman-DeVorzon BMl 
6290 Sunset, Hollywood, Calif. 

WRITERS: Dorsey Burnett-Barry DeVorzon 
ARR: Al DeLory FLIP: My Baby’s Gone 

#68 

HERE COMES THE RAIN, BABY (2:26) 

Eddy Arnold-RCA 9437 

155 East 24 Street, NYC. 

PROD; Chet Atkins c/o RCA 
806 17 Ave. S., Nashville, Tenn. 

PUB: Acuff Rose BMl 

2510 Franklin Rd. Nashville, Tenn. 

WRITER: Newbury ARR: Bill Walker 
FLIP: The World I Used To Know 

#69 

HI-HEEL SNEAKERS (2:44) 

Elvis Presley-RCA 9425 
155 East 24 St. NYC. 

PUB: Medal BMl 234 W. 56 St. NYC. 

WRITER: Higginbotham 
FLIP: Guitar Man 

#70 

PERSONALITY-CHANTILLY LACE (3:34) 

Mitch Ryder-Dynavoice 905 
c/o Dot 101 West 55 St., NYC. 

PROD: Bob Crewe 1841 Bway, NYC. 

PUB: Lloyd & Logan BMl (Personality) 

608 5th Ave., NYC.-Glad BMl (Chantilly Lace) 
314 East 11th St., Houston, Texas. 

WRITERS: Lloyd-Price (Personality) 

Richardson (Chantilly Lace) 

ARR: Bob Crewe FLIP: I Make A Fool Of Myself 









fever tree 
is coining 


#71 

MISSION IMPOSSIBLE (2:31) 

Lalo Schifrin-Dot 17059 
1507 N. Vine, Hollywood, Calif. 

PROD; Tom Mack c/o Dot 
PUB: Bruin BMl 780 N. Gower, H’wood, Calif 
WRITER: Lalo Schifrin ARR: Lalo Schifrin 
FLIP: Jim On The Move 

#72 

JUST DROPPED IN (3:20) 

First Edition-Reprise 0655 
4000 Warner Blvd. Burbank, Calif. 

PROD: Mike Post c/o Reprise 

PUB: Acuff Rose BMl 

2510 Franklin Rd. Nashville, Tenn. 

WRITER: Micky Neubury ARR: Mike Post 
FLIP: Shadow In The Corner Of Your Mind 

#73 

COUNT THE DAYS (2:36) 

Inez & Charlie Foxx-Dynamo 112 
240 West 55th Street, NYC. 

PROD: Charlie Foxx c/o Dynamo 
PUB: Catalogue BMl & C&l BMl (same address) 
WRITERS: Charlie Foxx-Jerry Williams- 
Brooks O’Dell-Yvonne Williams. 

ARR: Richard Rome-Jerry Williams 
FLIP: A Stranger I Don’t Know 

#74 

COLD FEET (2:43) Albert King-Stax 241 
1841 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Al Jackson Jr., c/o Stax 
PUB: East BMl 

926 E. McLemore Ave. Memphis, Tenn. 

WRITERS: Albert King-AI Jackson Jr. 

FLIP: You Sure Drive A Hard Bargain 

#75 

EXPLOSION IN MY SOUL (2:19) 

Soul Survivors-Crimson 1012 
1005 Chestnut St., Phila., Pa. 

PROD: Gamble, Huff, 250 S. Broad St. Phila, Pa. 
PUB: Double Diamond BMl, 

250 S. Broad St., Phila., Pa. 

Downstairs BMl, 5412 Osage Ave., Phila , Pa. 
WRITERS: K. Gamble, L. Huff 
FLIP: Dathon’s Theme 

#76 

NIGHT FO’ LAST (2:34) 

Shorty Long-Soul 35040 

2648 W. Grand Blvd. Detroit, Mich. 

PROD: Holland-Dozier c/o Soul 
PUB: Jobete BMl (same address) 

WRITERS: Paul-Long FLIP: Night Fo’ Last 

#77 

LOOK, HERE COMES THE SUN (2:53) 

Sunshine Co.-Imperial 66280 

6920 Sunset Blvd. H’wood, Calif. 

PROD; Joe Saraceno c/o Imperial 
PgB: Chardon BMl 1650 Bway, NYC. 

WRITERS; J. Boylan-T. Boylan 
ARR; Geo. Tipton FLIP; Its Sunday 

#78* 

THE CLICK SONG NUMBER ONE (2:55) 

Cher-Imperial 66282 

6920 Sunset Blvd., H’wood, Calif. 

PROD; Sonny Bono 

7715 Sunset Blvd., H’wood, Calif. 

PUB: Sam Fox BMl, 1841 Bway, NYC. 

WRITER; Miriam Makeba 
ARR; Harold R. Battiste Jr. 

FLIP; But 1 Can’t Love You More 

#79 

A MAN NEEDS A WOMAN (2:31) 
lames Carr-Goldwax 332 
1776 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Quinton Claunch-Rudolph Russell 
2445 Chelsea Ave, Memphis, Tenn. 

PUB: Rise BMl 3397 Renault St., Memphis, Tenn. 
Aim BMl 1776 Broadway, NYC. 

WRITER: 0. McClinton 
FLIP: Stronger Than Love 

#80 

A MILLION TO ONE (2:45) 

Five Stairsteps-Buddah 26 
1650 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD; Clarence Burke, Jr. 

c/o Kama Sutra, 1650 Bway, NYC. 

PUB: Jobete BMl 

2648 W. Grand Blvd. Detroit, Mich. 

WRITER; P. Medley FLIP: You Make Me So Mad 

#81 

THANK U VERY MUCH (2:30) 

Scaffold-Bell 701 

1776 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Tony Palmer, London, Eng. 

PUB: Felicia BMl 1780 Bway, NYC. 

WRITER: McGear ARR: Harry Robinson 
FLIP: Ide B The First 

#82 * 

GOT WHAT YOU NEED (2:37) 

Fantastic Johnny C-Phil La Of Soul 309 

c/o Jamie/Guyden, 919 N. Broad St., Phila., Pa. 

PROD: Jesse James (same address) 

PUB'; Dandelion BMl (same address) 

James Boy BMl, Norristown, Pa. 

WRITERS: J. James ARR: Bobby Martin 
FLIP: New Love 

#83 

STOP (2:43) Howard Tate-Verve 10573 
1350 Ave. of the Americas, NYC. 

PROD: Jerry Ragovoy 219 W. 79 St., NYC. 

PUB: Rag Mar BMl 219 W. 79 St., NYC. 

Rumbalero BMl 1619 Bway, NYC. 

WRITERS: Shuman-Ragovoy 

ARR: Garry Sherman FLIP; Shoot ’Em All Down 

#84 * 

IN THE MIDNIGHT HOUR (3:23) 

Mirettes-Revue 1004 

c/o UNI, 8255 Sunset Blvd., L.A., Calif. 

PROD; Jerry Goldstein, 369 Lex. Ave., NYC. 

PUB: East BMl, 926 E. McLemore Ave., Memphis, 
Tenn. 

Cotillion BMl, 1841 Broadway, NYC. 

WRITERS: S. Cropper-W. Pickett 
FLIP; To Love Somebody 


#85 * 

LA LA MEANS I LOVE YOU (3:06) 

Del Fonics-Philly Groove 150 
c/o Bell Records, 1776 Bway, NYC. 

PROD; Stan (The Man) Watson-Thom Bell 
c/o Nickel Shoe 

PUB: Nickel Shoe BMl, 261 S. 52, Phila., Pa. 
WRITERS: W. Hart-T. Bell ARR: Thom Bell 
FLIP: Can’t Get Over Losing You 


#86. 

TRY IT (2:40) 

Ohio Express-Cameo 2001 

c/o MGM 1350 Ave. of the Americas, NYC. 

PROD; J. Katz-Jerry Kaseneta 
165 West 46 Street, NYC. 

PUB: Blackwood BMl 1650 Bway. NYC. 

WRITERS: J. Levine-M. Bellack 
FLIP: Soul Struttin’ 

#87 * 

THE BALLAD OF BONNIE & CLYDE (3:07) 

Georgia Fame-Epic 10283 
51 West 52 street, NYC. 

PROD; Mike Smith 

6 S. Hampton PI., London WC 2, Eng. 

PUB: Peer Int’l BMl, 1619 Bway, NYC. 

WRITERS: M. Murray-P. Callander 
FLIP: Beware Of The Dog 

#88 * 

LOVE IS BLUE (2:41) 

Al Martino-Capitol 2102 
1750 N. Vine, H’wood, Calif. 

PROD: Boyle Gilmore c/o Capitol 

PUB: Croma ASCAP 

6124 Selma Ave., H’wood, Calif. 

WRITERS: Blackburn-Pott 

French lyrics-Cour ARR: Pete King 

FLIP: I’m Carrying The World On My Shoulders 


I. 

X: 

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4 





» 

^ . 


#89 

Love Explosions (2:55) 

Troy Keyes-Abc 11027 

1330 Ave. of the Americas, NYC. 

PROD: George Kerr c/o ABC 
PUB: Zira BMl P.O. Box 53, NYC. 

Floteca BMl 515 Madison Ave., NYC. 

WRITERS: G. Kerr-G. Harrison 

ARR: Richard Tee FLIP: I’m Crying (Inside) 

#90 

IT’S NOT EASY (2:53) Will-O-Bees -Date 1583 
51 West 52 street, NYC. 

PROD; Bill Traut 25 E. Chestnut St, Chicago, III. 
PUB: Screen Gems/Columbia BMl 711 5th Ave, NYC. 
WRITERS: B. Mann-C. Weil ARR: Shorty Rogers 
FLIP: Looking Glass 


fri- 

£ 


#91 * 

BURNING SPEAR (2:54) 

Soulful Strings-Cadet 5576 
320 E. 21 St.. Chicago, III. 

PROD: Richard Evans c/o Cadet J*** 

PUB: Discus BMl (same address) 

WRITER: Richard Evans ARR: Richard Evans 
FLIP; Within You Without You 

#92 

WHERE IS MY MIND (2:43) 

Vinilla Fudge-Atco 6554 
1841 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Shadow Morton for Community 
1650 Broadway, NYC. 

PUB: Cotillion BMl 1841 Bway, NYC. ^ 

Vanilla Fudge BMl 

WRITER: Mark Stein FLiP: The Look Of Love | < 




#93 * 

YOU DON’T HAVE TO SAY YOU LOVE ME (2:47) 
4 Sonics-Sport 110A 

c/o Bell Records, 1776 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Super Sonic Sound 

9350 Grand River Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

PUB; Robbins ASCAP, 1350 6th Ave., NYC. 
WRITERS: Domaggio-Pallavicini-Wickham-Napier- 
Bell FLIP: It Takes Two 

#94 * 

PEOPLE WORLD (2:15) Jim & Jean-Verve 5073 
1350 Ave of the Americas, NYC. 

PROD: Jimmy Wisner (same as Akbestal) 

PUB; Akbestai BMl, 888 8th Ave., NYC. 

WRITER: Glover ARR; Pete Dino 
FLIP: Time Goes Back Wards 


4 


#95 

CAB DRIVER (2:45) Mills Bros.-Dot 17041 
1507 N. Vine, Holiywood, Calif. 

PROD: Chas. R. Grean 

120 E. Hartsdaie Ave, Hartsdale, N.Y. 

PUB: Black Hawk BMl 

1800 N. Argyle Ave, H’wood, Calif. 

WRITER: C Carson Parks 
ARR: Sy Oliver FLIP: Fortuosity 

#96 * 

I’M GONNA MAKE YOU LOVE ME (2:40) 

Madeline Bell-Philips 1007 
110 West 57th St., NYC. 

PUB: Act 3 BMl, 35 E. Wacker Dr., Chicago, III. 
WRITERS: K. Gamble-J. Ross-J. Williams 
FLIP: Picture Me Gone 

#97 * 

MUSIC, MUSIC, MUSIC (2:30) 

Happenings-B. T. Puppy 538 
c/o Jubilee, 1790 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Bright Tune, 1697 Bway, NYC. 

PUB; Cromwell ASCAP, 10 Columbus Circle, NYC. 
WRITERS; Weiss-Baum ARR: Herb Bernstein 
FLIP: When I Lock My Door 







i 

- 




#98 

DO WHAT YOU GOTTA DO (3:20) 

Al Wilson-Soul City 761 

6920 Sunset Blvd., H’wood, Calif. 

PROD: Johnny Rivers 

6920 Sunset Blvd., H’wood, Calif. 

PUB: Johnny Rivers BMl (same address) 

WRITER; Jim Webb ARR: Marty Paich 
FLIP; Now 1 Know What Love Is 

#99 

FUNKY WAY (2:57) Calvin Arnold-Venture 605 
c/o MGM 1350 Ave of the Americas, NYC. 

PROD; Cooper-Paul c/o Venture 
8350 Wilshire Blvd. L.A. Calif. 

PUB; Mikim BMl 8350 Wilshire Blvd. L.A. Calif. 
WRITER: C. Arnold FLIP; Snatchin’ Back 

#100 * 

SUMMER TIME BLUES (3:43) 

Blue Cheer-Philips 40516 
110 West 57 St., NYC. 

PROD; Abe Kesh 

PUB: American BMl 

9109 Sunset Blvd., H’wood, Calif. 

WRITERS: Cochran-Capehart 

ARR: Blue Cheer FLIP: Out Of Focus 


•V». 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968j 



NEW RELEASES ON 

giifiRroist 

THE EXCITING NEW 
LABEL FROM STAX 




Available in mono and stereo 




PRESENTING ISAAC HAYES 
Enterprise 13-100 


RIDIN’ HIGH 
Maynard Fei^uson 
Enterprise 13-101 


JAZZ GOES TO CHURCH 
Father Herrera & The Trio ESP 
Enterprise 13-102 




iiii 





...And a new hit single 

Shirley Walton 

“I WAS BORN 
TO LOVE YOU” 


Enterprise 001 

Produced by AL JACKSON & EDDIE FLOYD 




Distributed by fATUANficI 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


29 




CashBoic Record Reviews 


r 


Picks oi ihe Week 


r 


Picks oi the Week 


PETULA CLARK (Warner Brothers 7170) 

Kiss Me Goodbye (3:53) [Donna Reed, ASCAP-Reed, Mason] 

Slipping into a soft styled ballad, Petula Clark shows a strong attractive- 
ness on this sweeping session. Accompanied by a lush orchestral splendor 
and easybeat r.hythm. Miss Clark delivers one of the strongest performances 
since “This Is My Song,” and promises to have her biggest hit across the 
pop and easy listening board. Flip: “I've Got Love Going For Me” (3:18) 
[Northern, ASCAP-Clark] Coupler is another solid outing with a bit more 
snap to it and a terrific vocal showing. Could make this a two-sider. 


OTIS & CARLA (Stax 244) 

Lovey Dovey (2:33) [Progressive, BMI-Ertegun, Curtis] 

Both individual monster sellers on the r&b fronts, and hot in pop markets, 
the late Otis Redding and Carla Thomas stir up another vibrant brew of blues 
on their working of the recent noise maker “Lovey Dovey.” Blistering beat 
makes the track a discotheque candidate and tremendous sales probable 
across the pop and r&b fronts. Flip: “New Year’s Resolution” (3:14) [East, 
Time, Redwal, BMI-Parker, Catron, Frierfon] 


SONNY & CHER (Atco 6555) 

Circus (3:50) [Chris Marc-Cotillion-BMI-Bono] 

Coming off “Good Combination,” Sonny and Cher should come right 
back into the pop spotlight with this way-out glimpse of police headquar- 
ters. Wild imagery, off-beat production work and an overal power could 
gain exposure for the side; and a word-of-mouth reputation for the 
controversial track should put it high in the sales picture. Flip: “I Would 
Marry You Today” (2:57) [Same credits] features Sonny solo. 


JACKIE WILSON & COUNT BASIE (Brunswick 55365) 

For Your Precious Love (2:40) [Sunflower, BMI-Butler, Brooks, Brooks] 
Branching out in collaboration along pop lines. Count Basie teams with 
Jackie Wilson on an up-dating of the very first Jerry Butler hit in a session 
that should capture honors in the r&b arena and plenty of pop-rock 
attention. Sensational vocal showing from Wilson, and grand orchestral 
luster make the side one to skyrocket. Flip: “Uptight” (2:3b) [Jobete, BMI- 
Cosby, Moy, Wonder] 


BILLY VERA & JUDY CLAY (Atlantic 2480) 

Country Girl-City Man (2:24) [Blackwood, BMI-Taylor, Daryll] 

Countrified blues orchestrations add a carnival atmosphere to this 
rollicking follow up to “Storybook Children.” Side is a throDoing slow-rock 
effort with vocal strength and plenty of ork power to start things in motion 
along r&b and pop lines. Bright side with smash potential. Flip: “So Good” 
(2:43) [Same pub, BMI-Taylor, Vera] 


ROYAL GUARDSMEN (Laurie 3428) 

I Say Love (2:14) [Roznique, BMI-Winslow, Taylor] 

Attractive ballad marks the exit of “Snoopy” songs in the Royal Guards- 
men’s bid to continue making hits. Entire change-about softening the team’s 
style and slowing down the pace, but nothing lost in terms of sales prospects; 
the group has a smooth vocal and easy-going instrumental lilt that should set 
the song for a fine chart ride. Flip: No Info available. 


GRASSROOTS (Dunhill 4122) 

Melody For You (2:45) [Trousdale, BMI-Sloan, Barri] 

Another noise-maker for the Grassroots comes out in the guise of a low- 
keyed rock ballad “Melody For You.” Unusual arrangements and the team’s 
fine sound add impact to the fetching strains of this Sloan-Barri composition. 
Lilting side with good dance and programming prospects. Should score with 
teen listeners. Flip: “Fley Friend” (2:58) [Trousdale, BMI-Entner, Grill] 


SANDY POSEY (MGM 13892) 

Something I’ll Remember (2:17) [Low-Sal, BMI-Buie, Cobb] 

Sounding more pop than ever before, country-rock lass Sandy Posey steps 
back into the spotlight with a glimmering ballad effort that should have her 
shooting into the best-seller ranks again. Easy-going lilt and attractive 
vocal are highlighted by beautiful orchestrations. Middle-of-the-road and 
easy-listening response is likely as well. Flip: “Silly Girl, Silly Boy” (2:16) 
[Sanblu, BMI-Posey] 


TOUSSAINT McCALL (Ronn 20) 

Like Never Before (3:12) [Su-Ma, Toupat, BMI-Robinson, McCall] 

Slow lament from the r&b favorite Toussaint McCall should prove another 
chart item for the chanter. Material is perfectly suited to his powerful vocal 
style and shows him to best advantage with the solid orchestral sway pro- 
vided on this excellent side. Slight trace of country in the arrangement adds 
more spice to the session. Flip: “I’m Gonna Make Me A Woman” (1:51) [Same 
credits.] 


EVIE SANDS (Cameo 2002) 

Billy Sunshine (3:06) [Blackwood, BMI-Gorgoni, Taylor] 

Stunning opening that throbs into an up-beat rock ballad should have the 
teens flocking for this new offering from Evie Sands. The track’s superb 
dance beat goes a long way with showcased vocal talents that bring out the 
best of pop and blues in one grand outing. Can be expected to break with 
terrific impact. Flip: “It Makes Me Laugh” (3:10) [Same credits.] 

NINA SIMONE (RCA Victor 9447) 

To Love Somebody (2:37) [Nemperor, BMI-Gibb, Gibb] 

Modern pop orchestrations and material from the Bee Gees’ songbook 
give a new look to the Nina Simone power and offer her the best track she 
has done in several months. Excellent performance of a powerful lover’s 
ballad on “To Love Somebody” should have Miss Simone scoring strongly 
with pop, r&b and easy listening fans. Powerhouse sales item here. Flip: 
“I Can’t See Nobody” (3:05) [Same credits.] 


ROGER WILLIAMS (Kapp 890) 

The Glory of Love (2:46) [Shapiro, Bernstein, ASCAP-Hill] 

Possibly the most pop oriented new reading of the much-recorded 
standard, Roger Williams’ performance of “The Glory of Love” could come 
but on top of the scramble for attention sparked by use of the song in 
“Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner.” Rock backing, chorale and rhythmic 
punch put drive behind the keyboard artistry for a romping session. Flip: 
“The Spinning Song” (2:05) [R-J, ASCAP-Adpt: Williams] 

PERRY COMO (RCA Victor 944^ 

The Father of Girls (3:27) [Cromwell, ASCAP-Drake] 

Splendid offering for the adult easy- listening audience, this track has 
power akin to Mike Douglas’ “Men In My Little Girl’s Life” and could prove 
just as big a sleeper. Exceptional vocal strength and a beautiful melody 
combine forces with outstanding lyrics to gain Perry Como the probability 
of pop as well as soft-spin breakout response. Flip: “Somebody Makes It 
So” (2:46) [Roncom, ASCIAP-Vance, Snyder] 

DICK HYMAN & “THE GROUP” (Command 4114) 

In the Heat of the Night (3:20) [United Artists, ASCAP-Bergman, Bergman, 
Jones] 

Approach of the Academy Awards shifts the spotlight back on the title 
song which should reap plenty of exposure in the orchestral reading of Dick 
Hyman and “The Group.” Fine and funky rendering of the recently Ray 
Charles vocal hit that is suited to pop, blues and middle-of-the-road program- 
ming. Excellent material. Flip: “Respect” (3:06) [East, Time, Redwal, BMI- 
Redding] 


MANFRED MANN (Mercury 72770) 

Quinn The Mighty (2:51) iDwarf, ASCAP-Dylan] 

Lively combination of a funky-rock track workout and lyrics by Bob Dylan 
give the strong-action go-ahead to Manfred Mann. Flute arrangements (in the 
"There Is A Mountain” styse) and a trace of caiypso add zest to a tremendous 
effort that shou.d become a chart-busting side. Terrific session. Flip: “By 
Request — Edwin Garvey” (2:23) [Dick, James, BMI-D’Abo] 


BOBBY BYRD & JAMES BROWN (King 6151) 

You’ve Got to Change Your Mind (3:15) [Golo, BMI-Brown, Byrd, Redd, Lenhoff] 
Outstanding pairing of James Brown and Bobby Byrd makes for some grand 
spinning material for r&b deejays. The team grooves siowiy on a hara-push 
ballad that shows strength without speed through powerful vocals and throb- 
bing orchestral backing. Cute lyrical snatches should stir up plenty of ex- 
citement for the side. Flip: Byrd solo — “I’ll Lose My Mind” (2:42) [Golo, 
BMI-Brown, Hobgood, Byrd] 


CHRIS FARLOWE (Immediate 5005) 

Handbags & Gladrags (3:29) [Lovely, ASCAP-d’Abo] 

Original English hit version of “Handbags & Gladrags” comes into re- 
lease here after two strong readings have already stirred up initial response. 
In the long run, though, Farlowe’s phenomenal vocal strength could walk 
away with hit honors. Tremendous session that could breakout on the rock 
front. Flip: “Everyone Makes a Mistake” (2:03) [Nice Songs, BMI-Alcock, 
Crane] 


DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE (Mr G 805) 

House (2:27) [Andros, BMI-Durr] 

Second sampling of the talents of the Declaration of Independence shows 
the team still sounding fine with a smooth precision on vocal and instru- 
mental ends of “House.” Smooth-rock that features easy-going group chant 
with rhythmic ork push make the new side one that will become a teen 
favorite. This track should bring the group into the spotlight. Flip: “Next 
Stop— Dead-End Street” (2:42) [Cymbal, BMI-Tobin, Gimbel] 


TREMELOES (Epic 10293) 

Suddenly You Love Me (2:45) [Ponderosa, BMI-Callander, Pace, Panzeri, Pilat] 
Striking rhythmic outing from the Tremeloes gives the team another winner 
to keep the hit string intact. Happy bounce and a terrific up-tempo side done 
with mirthful group vocals and a soiid orchestral drive make it possibly the 
brightest side by the Tremeloes in a long while. Smash offering. Flip: “Sud- 
denly Winter” (2:26) [Mainstay, BMI-Blakiey, Hawkes] 


KENNY O’DELL (Vegas 722) 

Springfieid Plaie (2:22) [Beautiful, BMI-Gay] 

Frolic of an up-tempo side marks Kenny O’Dell’s return to the pop scene 
after the name-making “Beautiful People” contest with Bobby Vee. Tune- 
smith with several hits under his belt, the artist should catch top twenty 
honors with this offering that captures the life and drive of rock in a smooth 
thrusting side. Flip: “I’m Gonna Take It” (2:47) [Mirwood, Coors, BMI-O’Dell] 


AL BAND (Capitol 2104) 

Nel Sole (1:49) [Blackwood, BMI-Massara, Pallavicini] 

One of the biggest Italian hits of a consistent leader in Italian pop music, 
this offering from Al Bano shows the chanter’s power in a side that should 
bridge language barriers and set up a following for him in the US. Strong 
side with plenty of potential for the American rock and middle-of-the-road 
markets. Flip: "Pensieri P.33” (3:00) [Blackwood, BMI-Conz, Beretta, Mo- 
negasco] 


TONI LaMARR (Buddah 29) 

I’ll Do Anything (2:28) [Van McCoy, T. M., BMI-McCoy] 

Very special vocal sound of Toni LaMarr pours out a solid showing on 
this new finger-snapping ballad blues track. Noise-makers before and a 
fine outing here should establish a reputation for the entertainer among 
r&b fans and pop breakout could follow. Might make a big showing. Flip.- 
“If I Didn’t Love You” (2:40) [Same pubs, BMI-Williams, McCoy] 


.10 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 






-i 





Tommy’s Fastest 
Break-Out To Date 


b/w “Soft Words 

ABC 11039 


Produced by Butch Parker & Tommy Roe 


ABC RECORDS, INC, 

NEW YORK/0EVERLY HILLS 

DiST. IN Canada by sparfon of Canada 


!ash Box — February 10, 1968 


31 






CashBox Record Reviews 



r 


Picks oi the Week 


JON & ROBIN (Abnak 127) 

Dr. Jon (2:10) [Earl Barton, BMI-Thompson] 

Smooth flowing rock rhythm sets a solid backdrop to this cute outing from 
the noise-making team of Jon & Robin. Fine vocal work from the twosome, 
an attractive trace of humor in their delivery, and mirthful lyrical contents 
are likely to prove the biggest outing from the duo. Fine teen attraction that 
should reach hit sales reception. Flip: “Love Me Baby” (2:20) [Jetstar, BMI- 
Abnor, Rambo, Patterson] 

JOHNNY THUNDER & RUBY WINTERS (Diamond 238) 

We Only Have One Life (2:55) [Zira, BMI-Poindexter, Harper, Poindexter] 
Solid r&b outing with the prospect of breaking over in pop areas. The track 
is a coupling with overtones and the message of a “We Belong Together,” 
and is done with some powerful vocal and orchestral shine that will spur 
blues buyer sales and possible spillover. Could click. Flip: No info available. 



JAMES HENDRICKS (Soul City 763) 

Sunshine Showers (3:12) [Johnny Rivers, BMI-Hendricks] 

Fine folky flavor with a pleasant snap in the rhythm give James Hendricks 
a solid shot at hit acceptance on the performer level. Entry is a pretty ballad 
written by Hendricks who penned Johnny Rivers’ “Summer Rain.” Nice vocal 
quality and material could put the side on programming lists in pop and 
easy listening formats. Flip: “I Think Of You” (3:20) [Same credits.] 


LITTLE TONY (Warner Brothers 7166) 

I Love Mary (2:45) [Gil, BMI-Kongas] 

First English-language release by this bright European star shows him in 
a powerful ballad that could well steal honors on the pop front. Easy-going 
melody with soft guitar and orchestral backdrop that builds nicely for a solid 
finish. Love lyrics could catch the teen fancy. Very fine side with terrific 
sales potential. Flip: “I’m Cornin’ Home” (2:10) [George Pincus, ASCAP- 
Weiss, Schlaks] 


JUSTIN (Down East 5342) 

Right Now (2:30) [Downeast, BMI-Justin] 

Packing a potent beat and some grand soul chanting vocals, Justin bows 
in a session that should grab a big piece of r&b action with plenty of pop 
reaction to boot. Terrific dance appeal and excellent programming prospects 
could be just the key to the winner’s circle for the lid. Might skyrocket. Flip: 
“What Can I Do” (2:35) [Same credits.] Down East Records, 53 Pitt St., NYC. 


INFORMATIONS (Date 1590) 

I’m Holding You Responsible (2:58) [Frabob, BMI-Frazier] 

Rhythm & blues powerhouse here on a towering ballad that should see 
heavy airplay and sales reactions. Starting at a peak and maintaining the 
tension and emotional involvement right through to the end, the Informations 
have a tremendous effort on “I’m Holding You Responsible” that should 
break big with blues and pop fans. Flip: “What A Rib Adam Must Have Had” 
(2:12) [Same credits.] 


PETER’S PIPERS (Philips 40518) 

Airplane (2:33) [Cristobell, BMI-Hewlett, Tiley] 

Throbbing mid-speed beat, airy touches of harp and mandolin, and a good 
vocal showing from Peter’s Pipers serve up an appealing rock track that 
should hit it off with dance-minded teens and pop deejays. Fine material 
gives the group a terrific prospect of breakout action. Could take off. Flip: 
“I Didn’t Believe Her” (2:12) [Suriba, BMI-Smith] 


FABULOUS FARQUAHR (Verve Forecast 5077) 

Sister Theresa’s East River Orphanage (3:21) 

[Hastings, Jonathan Glenn, BMI-Farquahr] 

A story whose narrative strength could well make it another “Billie Joe” 
type candidate for fame tells of a neighborhood rebel Robin Hood. In- 
teresting vocal chorale effect and production work should snag plenty of 
attention for this extraordinary side. Could come from left field. Flip: “My 
Eggs Don’t Taste the Same Without You” (1:27) [Same credits.] 


MERRILEE RUSH (Bell 705) 

Angel of the Morning (2:58) [Blackwood, BMI-Taylor] 

Currently making noise for Danny Michaels (LHI), “Angel of the Morning” 
is beautifully handled in a femme version by Merrilee Rush. The song comes 
across powerfully with a terrific orchestral set hinting of steel complementing 
a country-flavored tinge in the vocal. Strong finish puts enough power in the 
deck to give it a best-seller sendoff. Flip: “Reap What You Sow” (2:12) 
[Press, BMI-James] 


SINTRIFICAL FOURS (Mr G 807) 

The Music Got To Me (2:40) [White Way, ASCAP-Evans, Parnes] 

Slow building volume and power on this easy-going ballad combines forces 
with a very good vocal and some grand teen-geared lyrics to make a side 
that stands to break through on the rock front. Attractive material well per- 
formed on “The Music Got To Me” should see terrific action. Flip: “Changes” 
(2.15) [White Way, ASCAP-Esposito, Tourso] 


ANDREA HENRY (MGM 13893) 

The Grass Is Greener (2:40) [J.E.F., BMI-Gregory, Briggs] 

Strong rhythmic attraction highlighted by an unusual femme-vocal make 
“The Grass Is Greener” a likely breakout side for r&b deejays. The track’s 
excellent dance appeal and its ability to grow on listeners make it a prospect 
for plenty of pop attention. Could skyrocket. Flip: “I Need You Like A Baby” 
(2:12) [Little People, Brookings, BMI-Warren, Wright] 


Newcomer Picks ^ 

ROBB FORTUNE (Now 2) 

Crazy Feelin’ (2:26) [Drive-In, Mardix, BMI-Martin, Nathans] 

Socking Latin beat taken for a Detroit-styled ride and packed with some 
happy sound by Robb Fortune, “Crazy Feelin’ ” comes across as a rock-out 
offering that is likely to capture a chunk of teen sales. Fine dance beat with 
driving ork thust and a grand vocal. Flip: “Sweetheart of Mine” (2:30) [Same 
credits.] Now Records, 7120 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood. 

MICHAEL BREWER & TOM SHIPLEY (A&M 905) 

Keeper of the Keys (3:12) [Good Sam, BM 1-Brewer, Shipley] 

Low-keyed folk blues outing with English influence and plenty of fine work 
on the guitar and vocal tracks. Slow dance rhythm and fine imagery should 
push the side into pop spotlights across the country. Building attraction that 
makes the side even better with extra listens should get things going with 
just a little exposure. Flip: “I Can’t See Her” (2:52) [Same credits.] More 
good work on the flip side could bring added attention to the outing. 

^ Best Bets 


LEONARD COHEN (Columbia 44439) 
Suzanne (3:47) [Project Seven, BMI- 
Cohen] Contemporary songwriter/ 
poet /singer Leonard Cohen here offers 
his version of his most successful 
cleffing. Noel Harrison’s version of 
“Suzanne” made the charts, and Judy 
Collins sings the song on an album. 
A tunefull ballad with fantastic and 
(to this reviewer) abstruse lyrics, the 
ditty could see action for Cohen as a 
singer. Flip: “Hey, That’s No Way 'Lo 
Say Goodbye” (2:54) [Stranger, BMI- 
Cohen] 


CHRIS MONTEZ (A&M 906) 

The Face I Love (2:13) [Barnaby, 
Janiero, BMI-Gilbert, Valle, Pinga- 
rilho] Chris Montez could score with 
this rhythmic pop-good music bouncer. 
Keep tabs. Flip: “Once In Awhile” 
(2:07) [Miller, ASCAP-Green, Ed- 
wards] 


TONY FOX (Calla 146) 

(I’ve Got to) Do It To It (2:23) 
[Unbelievable, BMI-Vann, White] Ov- 
erwhelming sock in the vocal thrust 
makes this side one that will soon be 
soaring on the r&b scene. Powerful 
attraction could set the deck for a big 
pop run. Flip: “E.S.P.” (3:04) [Same 
pub, BMI-Vann] 


CHARLES SPURLING (King 6142) 
That Woman (2:37) [You & Me, BMI- 
Spurling] Familiar blues chanter 
Charles Spurling turns in another 
splendid vocal jaunt on this slow to 
mid-speed track. The song and his ex- 
cellent handling of it make the side 
one to watch for r&b action. Flip: 
“Which One” (2:32) [Same credits.] 


DARROW FLETCHER (Revue 11008) 
The Way Of a Man (2:50) [Muriel, 
Polarity, BMI-Simpkins] Very fine 
r&b chant on this hard-rhythm, easy 
going ballad. Attractive styling along 
the lines of a Stevie Wonder offering 
give the record a good shot at finding 
breakout reception. Flip: “I Like the 
Way I Feel” (2:55) [Same credits.] 


FERRIS WHEEL (Philips 40512) 

I Can’t Break the Habit (2:15) [A1 
Gallico, BMI-Kellaher, Fitzpatrick, 
Wood] Out of England comes this 
hard-hitting rock effort that makes 
the most of an outstanding group 
effort. Side could snag a good deal of 
teen attention and find sleeper action. 
Flip: “Number One Guy” ^:58) 

[Bigtop, BMI-Kellaher] 


VOYAGE (Decca 32265) 

One Day (2:35) [Kama Stura, BMI- 
Klaskow] Medium speed ballad with 
some enticing orchestral touches and a 
good vocal that could stride into the 
teen scene spotlight. Flip: “Same Old 
Song” (2:50) [Jobete, BMI-Holland, 
Dozier, Holland] 


PERCY FAITH (Columbia 44446) 
For Those In Love (2:25) [Leo Feist, 
ASCAP-Hart, Lawrence] Lively romp 


that has pop vitality and easy-listen- 
ing polish could turn up as a sleeper 
for the Percy Faith Orchestra and 
Chorus. Pretty and perky track. Flip: 
“There Was A Time” (3:02) [Sham- 
ley, ASCAP-iSigman, Faith] 


MARILYN MICHAELS (ABC 11043) 
Kansas City (3:00) [Lois, BMI-Leiber, 
Stoller] Torchy blues version of the 
well-known rock and blues hit done up 
with tremendous vocal power and easy 
going jazz orking. Could ride high on 
both pop and adult popularity ratings. 
Flip: “Show Me” (2:58) [Chappell, 
ASCAP-Lerner, Loewe] 


JACKIE DeSHANNON (Imperial 
66281) 

Me About You (2:15) [Chardon, BMI- 
Gordon, Bonner] Very nicely per- 
formed ballad cutie from the Gordon & 
Bonner catalog should attract con- 
siderable attention along pop and 
easy listening circuits. Could break 
loose. Flip. “I Keep Wanting You” 
(2:45) [Metric, Chardon, BMI-Nitz- 
sche, DeShannon] 


GLENN YARBROUGH (RCA Victor 
9452) 

Face In The Crowd (2:01) [Screen 
Gems-Columbia, BMI-Gates] Excep- 
tional vocal talents of Glenn Yar- 
brough are turned onto a throbbing 
ballad in this sampling from his new 
LP. Suited for easy listening and pop- 
ular music formats. Flip: “Times Gone 
By” (3:15) [Stanyan, ASCAP-Mc- 
Kuen] Beautiful ballad that could 
steal the soft-spin spotlight. 


CLEBANOFF STRINGS (Decca 
32263) 

When Will It End? (P.J.’s Theme) 
(3:20) [Shamley, ASCAP - Hefti, 
Cahn] Organ showcase with soaring 
strings and a lazy samba rhythm on 
this movie theme. Lovely tune for easy 
listening and late hour programming. 
Flip: “Wait Until Dark” (2:38) [M. 
Witmark, Northern, ASCAP-Mancini, 
Living'ston, Evans] 


PLIZZLES (Fat Back 216) 

I Need You (2:50) [Clita, BMI-Culley, 
Water, Price] Potent brew of r&b 
rhythmics and hard-hitting vocals. 
Lively tempo and unusual group har- 
monies make the side one that 
stands out. Could catch fire. Flip: 
“My Sweet Baby” (2:40) [Same 
credits] 


LOVED ONES (Roulette 7003) 

I Love How You Love Me (2:07) 
[Screen Gems-Columbia, BMI-Mann, 
Kolber] Revival of the old hit could 
steal much of the attention from Clau- 
dine Longet’s new release of the same 
song. Soft group sound with very at- 
tractive backdrop that might make the 
side blossom. Flip: “Do You Wanna 
Know What I Think” (2:12) [Kama 
Sutra, BMI-Laguna] 

Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


i 

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Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


33 








^shBox Record Reviews 


4 


Q Best Bets 




ANITA HARRIS (Columbia 44438) 
Comes The Night (Carol’s Theme) 
(2:39) [Ensign, BMI-Shaper, Gold- 
smith] Romantic, blues-toned ballad 
from the Paramount flick, “Sebastian.” 
Nicely sung by Anita Harris, the side 
should receive pl'enty of play from 
good music stations. Flip: “Anniver- 
sary Waltz” (2:40) [Mayfair, ASCAP- 
Dubin, Franklin] 


LLOYD GREEN (Big A 102) 

Panic (“A Trip”) (2:10) [Mayhew, 
BMI-Thatcher, Doheny, Reid] Famed 
country steel guitarist Lloyd Green 
here performs a pop instrumental that 
has psychedelic properties but is mild- 
sounding compared to hard-core psy- 
chedelic efforts. On the flip, “Panic” 
is played backwards and sounds a 
good deal more psychedelic. Maybe the 
flip is the side to push. Big A Records, 
c/o Little Darlin’ Records, 804 18th 
Ave. S., Nashville, Tenn. 


SHIRLEY & JOHNNY (World Pacific 
77881) 

And I Don’t Want Your Love (3:01) 
[Big Top Records, BMl-Affrunti, Ali] 
Shirley & Johnny could earn a fair 
number of spins with this rhythmic 
romance ditty. Listen to it. Flip: 
“There Go Heartaches” (2:35) [Mor- 
ley, AS'CAP-Bagnell] 


LARRY ATKINS (Remark 115) 
Ain’t 'lhat Love Enough (2:25) [Five 
Point, Yenom, BMI-Marchand, Harris] 
Here’s a rousing R&B love rocker 
that could garner a nice amount of 
spins for cnanter Larry Atkins. Scan 
it. r'lip: “nave Mercy On Me” (2:25) 
[Five-Point, Prompt, BMI-Harris, 
Payne] Remark Records, 2611 Hauser 
Blvd., Cuiver Gity, Cal. 


GRAHAM GOLDMAN (EGA Victor 
9453) 

The Impossible Years (2:35) [Man- 
Ken, BMI-Gouidman] Tuneiul mas- 
sage ode about tfle problems of cae 
aflolescent girl. Side was co-prouuced 
by Graham Goldman and Peter Noone 
(Herman ox Herman's Hermits). Could 
do nicely if given good exposure. Flip: 
“No Milk Pouay” (2:12) [Man-Ken, 
BMI-Gouldman] 


TOBI LEGEND (Mala 591) 

Time Will Pass \ou By (3:00) [Gom- 
ba, BMI - Rhys, Fekaris, Zesses] 
Songstress Tool Legend puts a lot of 
spirit into this rousing, message-bear- 
ing R&B foot-stomper. Flip: “Heart- 
breaker” (2:40) [Aim, BMI-Galla, 
Pinto] 


RITA WRIGHT (Gordy 7064) 

1 Can’t Give Hack the Liove 1 Feel for 
You (2:38) [Jobete, BMI — Ashford, 
Simpson, Holland] Strong soul entry 
that could hit big in the r&b listings 
and might very well pick up a bright 
pop showing. Detroit sound with a new 
vocalist Who packs a terrific vocal 
power. Flip: “Something On My 

Mind” (2:08) [Jobete, hMI — Ash- 
ford, Simpson] 


PIECES OF EIGHT (A&M 907) 

Party Time (2:29) [Fame, BMi-Penn, 
Oldham] Lively atmosphere jammed 
into the session makes the new Pieces 
of Eight outing one that could grab a 
large piece of the r&b action. Good 
beat deck. Flip: “It Will Stand” (2:30) 
[Minit, BMI-Johnson] 


JOHN ROSASCO (Uni 55048) 

Coffee And Tea (2:20) [Duchess, BMI- 
Rosasco] Entertaining teen ballad 
with a beat that could stir up attention 
for this newcomer artist. Fine song 
that up-dates the old “I like coffee, I 
like tea” refrain with a dance beat 
xhat could click. Flip: “Love Comes 
On” (3:09) [Same credits.] 


TRINI LOPEZ (Reprise 0659) 

Sally Was A (Jood Old Girl (2:41) 
[Pamper, BMI-Howard] Up-tempo 
snap to this side could attract a consid- 
erable pop play along with the regular 
Trini Lopez middle-of-the-road show- 
ings. Combined strength could break 
the side wide open. Flip : “It’s A Great 
Life” (3:07) [Tapez, ASCAP-O’Hara, 
McReynolds] 

VANDELS (Souled Out 130) 

All In My Mind (2:17) [Figure, BMI- 
Kirkland, Johnson, Brown] Old-time 
flavor in this slow ballad aimed at a 
teen-age market. Blues deejays and 
some pop stations could turn up a win- 
ning item here. Flip: “Soulin’ ” (2:33) 
[Stinger, BMI-Vandels] Souled Out 
Records, P. O. Box 8207, Albuquerque, 
New Mexico. 


NEW COLONY SIX (Mercury 72775) 
I Will Always Think About You (2:22) 
[New Colony, BMI-Rice] Attractive 
ballad selection with a lovely group 
vocal could stir up attention for the 
New Colony Six. Well performed track 
with easy listening and pop appeal. 
Flip: “Hold Me With Your Eyes” 
(2:21) [Same pub, BMI-Graffla, Jr.] 

J. J. BARNES (Revilot 216) 

Hold On To It (2:25) [LeBaron, BMI- 
Barnes] Detroit work-out with some 
terrific blues guitar work to enhance 
an excellent vocal from J. J. Barnes. 
The track packs a powerful wallop 
that could send it soaring on the r&b 
charts. Flip: “Now She’s Gone” (2:05) 
[Same credits.] 

JOHN LEE HOOKER (Blues Way 
61014) 

Cry Before I Go (2:38) [Alstein, BMI- 
Smith, Jackson] Flashy workout with 
John Lee Hooker’s distinctive guitar 
and voice make this side a likely favor- 
ite with Chicago blues fans and pop- 
sters caught up in the new blues 
revival. Flip: “Mr. Lucky” (2:52) [Al- 
stein, BMI-Hooker, Smith] 

6 TICKETS TO SHANGRI-LA (Talmu 
311) 

Lonely People (2:50) [Talmu, BMI- 
Flynn, Malinowski] Lyrical impact 
could do the trick for this rock item 
served up by newcomers, the 6 Tickets 
to Shangri-La. Snappy tempo track 
aimed at teen audiences. Flip: “I’ve 
Got To Find a Way” (2:05) [Same 
credits.] 

PAT FARRELL (Diamond 239) 

All My Love (2:45) [Ponderosa, BMI- 
Callander, Arduini] Attractive ballad 
very nicely performed, this track could 
become an easy listening selection slat- 
ed for plenty of exposure. Fine juke 
box addition for restaurant locations. 
Flip: “Bad Woman” (2:30) [Tobi-Ann, 
Becks-BMI-Patrick, Sickafus] 

OTHER VOICES (Atlantic 2479) 

May My Heart Be Cast Into Stone 
(2:25 [Saturday, BMI-Randell, Lin- 
zer] Very fine song that takes a lively 
turn in this rendition. Could prove 
stiff competition for the Don & the 
Goodtimes reading already in release. 
Flip: “Hune Up On Love” (2:29) 
[Pineywood, BMI-Levinson, Harris] 

SHARON TANDY (Atco 6556) 

World (3:21) [Nemperor, BMI-B. & 
R. Gibb] Lark Sharon 'Tandy could 
see action with her full-bodied read- 
ing of this Bee Gees hit. Eye it. Flip: 
“Fool On The Hill” (2:54) [Maclean, 
BMI-Lennon, McCartney] 

MATT MONRO (Capitol 2103) 

Pretty Polly (2:15) [Shamley, AS- 
CAP-Legrand, Black] Matt Monro de- 
livers a smooth vocal on this pretty 
good music ballad. Could go. Flip: 
“Don’t Answer Me” (2:29) [Pon- 
derosa, BMI-Callender, Zambrini, En- 
riquez] 


THIRD RAIL (Epic 10285) 

It’s Time to Say Goodbye (2:40) [Mel- 
rose, ASCAP-Cooper, Brooks] Sweet 
and low ballad session from the pop 
team that hit with two recent singles, 
this effort is a good one that should 
attract considerable attention. Flip: 
“Overdose of Love” (2:12) [T.M., 

BMI-Levine, Resnick] 


NICE (Immediate 5004) 

The Thoughts of Emerlist Davjack 
2:40) [Nice iSongs, BMI-Davjack] 
Out-of-the-ordinary side which com- 
bines elements of classical sounds and 
modern rock features the English act 
(now touring the US) in a fine effort 
that could score. Flip: “Azrial (Angel 
of Death)” (2:48) [Same credits] 


TOMMY WILLIS (Gregory 100) 
Man With a Horn (2:54) [Crystal, 
ASCAP - Lake, Jenny, DeLange] 
Standard gets a fine new sax-and-or- 
gan showcase on a track that could 
delight easy listening and coin-oper- 
ator hands. Sentimental track with 
good potential. Flip: “Ua-Dee-Dah” 
(2:35) [Club Miami, BMI-Wills] 


LOLLIPOP FANTASY (Era 3193) 
It’s A Groovy World (2:06) [Pattern, 
ASCAP-Richards] Unusual easy-beat 
deck with a lilt that could start some 
pop action for the Lollipop Fantasy. 
Breezy handling could click with mid- 
dle-of-the-road spots too. Flip: “Wait- 
ing for a Dream” (2:01) [Pattern, 
ASCAP- Young] 


WILDARE EXPRESS (Brunswick 
55363) 

A River’s Invitation (2:27) [Venice, 
BMI-Mayfield] Jazzy sax workout 
with a lievly flair for pop deejays 
could attract exposure along the mid- 
dle-of-the-road circuit for this set. 
Flip: “Walk On By” (2:30) [Jac, Blue 
Seas, ASCAP-David, Bacharach] 


ROBERTA PECK (Columbia 44448) 
If You Ever Leave Me Now (3:10) 
[Poz, ASCAP - Devens] Attractive 
serving of a melancholy love track 
with delightful vocal sound. Pace picks 
up mid-way for added easy-listening 
spice. Flip: “A Cold, Cold Winter 
(2:55) [Shapiro, Bernstein, ASCAP- 
Ballard, Jr.] 


MICHEL LEGRAND (MGM 13894) 
Love Theme From Elvira Madigan 
(2:35) [Robbins, ASCAP-Adpt: Le- 
grand] Theme from the outstanding 
foreign film now attracting large au- 
diences. Delicate performance of the 
song based on a Mozart melody. Flip: 
“iMelange” (3:04) [Beaujolais, AS- 
CAP-Legrand] 


BABY DOLLS (Gamble 213) 

(Please) Don’t Rush Me (2:17) [Razor 
iSharp, Hot Breeze, BMl-Gamble, Ba- 
cone] Here’s a feelingful R&B love 
ode that could see sales action for the 
Baby Dolls. Give it a listen. No infor- 
mation available on the flip side at this 
time. 


SPIRAL STARECASE (Columbia 
44442) 

Baby What I Mean (2:21) [Unart, 
BMI-Hamilton, Sheldon] Infectious 
rock number which features some very 
good orchestral and vocal attractions 
along with a fine dance beat to put the 
sales machinery into operation. Could 
take off. Flip: “Makin’ My Mind Up” 
(2:15) [Preacher, BMI-Dalton, Mont- 
gomery] 

BONNIE & the CLYDES (Audio Fi- 
delity l4l) 

Ninny Bop Bop (1:53) [White Way, 
ASCAP-Sanders, Lipps] Weird track 
along the lines of the way-back “Pink 
Shoe Laces” hit that came from left 
field, this off-the-wall track could find 
a novelty reception that will put it in 
the noise-maker class. Flip : No info 
available. 


4 -- 


DAVE DAVIES (Reprise 0660) * 

Susannah’s Still Alive (2:20) [Noma, > 
BMI-Davies] “Batman” opening draws 
attention to this hard-hitting English 
outing. Kinks fans already familiar 
with Davies should turn out in num- 
bers to stir up best-seller action for< A ^ 
the side. Flip: “Funny Face” (2:13) 
[Same credits] % . 


BUDDY DAVIS (Barrington 5006) ^ 

Anyone Can Move A Mountain (2:40) 

[St. Nicholas, ASCAP-Marks] Lively 
version of the oft-recorded ballad that 
is coming into near-standard class. _ ' 
Fine vocal offering makes the lid a --^|- 
prospect for middle-of-the-road and . 
easy-listening programming and coin- 
operator acceptance. Flip : “On a [ 

Clear Day” (2:20) [Chappell, ASCAP- ^,j 
Lane, Lerner] 

HAMILTON CAMP (Warner Brothers 
7165) [ 

Here’s To You (2:16) [Rayham,- *f 
ASCAP-Camp] Stepping into the pop > j 
train with his first WB single, Hamil- 
ton Camp shows an unusual and de- [ 
lightful ability to combine elements of 
modern easy-rock with light jazz and [ 
Dylan-phrasing for a unique session 
that could very easily take wing. Flip: 
“Leavin’ Anyhow” (2:35) [Same < 
credits] . 


JULIE MONDAY (SSS Int’l 731) ^ 

I Wanna Be Your Baby (2:36) [Screen 
Gems-iColumbia, BMI-Kolber, Fischoff] 
Exciting vocal talent and a bright 
selection showcase Julie Monday with ^ , 
this smooth rock sampling. Could do 
well with outlets from teen to middle- 
of-the-road. Flip: “Love’s Funny" 

Book” (2:12) [Shelby Singleton, BMI- 
Lewis, Smith] -•* ■ 

JOHN HARTFORD (RCA Victor 
9451) 

Big Blue Balloon (2:50) [Glaser, 
BMI-Hartford] Fareway opening seg- 
ments eases into a dreamlike almost 
Donovan-ish ambler. Soft waltz tune - “ 
spiced by exotic orchestral atmosphere 
and a tale out-of-the-ordinary could< -k 
become a conversation deck with easy- 
listening and teen-oriented program- 
mers. Flip: “The Six O’Clock Train & ' 

a Girl With Green Eyes” (2:38) [Same 
credits] F 


JACK HANSEN (Marko 929) 

Comes the Night (2:18) [Ensign, BMI- 
Goldsmith, Shaper] Theme song from- ' p 
the newly opened movie “Sebastian” > 
offers a lovely piece of good music ^ I 
material. Soft setting combines big , ’ 
band and sitar licks for possible ex- ^ 
posure in easy listening and teen 
formats. Flip : “To Sir With Love” 
(2:47) [Screen Gems-Columbia, BMI- vf 
London, Black] 4 

HORST JANKOWSKI (Mercury'" 
72766) . # i 

The (jlory of Love (2:27) [Shapiro, ; 
Bernstein — ASCAP — Hill] Ever- ^ ^ 
popular pianist tackles the theme from 
“Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” in a 
swinging side that could stir up plenty 
of middle-of-the-road exposure and 
jukebox action. Flip: “Lazy” (2:41) ^ 

CLIFF NOBLES (Phil-LA of Soul ,, 1 
310) ■ 

The More I Do For You, Baby (2:50) 
[Dandelion, James Bay, BMI-James] f 
Terrific r&b appeal built into this i 
easy-rock pulsator could start the hit * [ 
machinery in motion for Cliff Noble. 
Excellent side with breakout potential.- - 1. 
Flip info not available. 

WILLIE & WALKERS (United ' 
Artists 50249) 

In My Room (2:16) [Robbins, ASCAP 
— Prieto, Vance, Pockriss] Rhythmic ; 
throb behind this piece of blue-eyed 
funk a la Procol Harum. The lid is a ! 
low-down organ showcase with some-^*'^ 
interest nabbing vocals. Good teen side 
that could take off. Flip: “Poor Janie” - 
(2:02) [Dundee, BMI — MacCaulder] 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


24 





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ORIGINAL MOTION PICTURE SCORE BY LESLIE BRICUSSE WRITTEN 
ESPECIALLY FOR "DOCTOR DOLITTLE:' CONTAINS 14 GREAT SONGS: 

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THIS ALBUM CONTAINS DELUXE 8 PAGE FULL COLOR STORY & PICTURE BOOKLET 


North To Staff In 
Nashboro Expansion 

NASHVILLE — In a continuing expan- 
sion policy at Nashboro Record Co., 
the sales and promotion staff has been 
strengthened with the addition of 
Fi'eddie North to further the label’s 
R&B lines, Excello and A-Bst, and its 
spiritual labels. Crescent and Nash- 
boro. 

He is no newcomer to the record 
industry having been a recording art- 
ist since 1955. North also currently 
records on the A-Bet label, one of 
Nashboro’s R&B lines. He made a trip 
to American Bandstand with “Ok, So 
What” on University label for Liberty. 

North worked for two years with 
WLAC-TV-Nashville’s R&B show, 
“Night Train.” 

He attended Tennessee State Uni- 
versity in Nashville where he ma jored 
in speech and drama. North was in 
Nashboro’s order department before 
moving to his new position to work 
with Bud Howell, vice president in 
charge of promotion and sales, anl 
Bob Holmes, who does A&R as well 
as promotion on the Excello, A-Bet, 
Crescent, and Nashboro lines. 

North who continues to record on 
the A-Bet label, will have a new single 
release soon. 



Freddie North 


Catron To Speak 
At Boston Univ. 

NEW YORK — The American Music 
Workshop, which will debut later this 
month at Boston University, will fea- 
ture Stan Catron, president of Borwin 
Enterprises, as the first guest lecturer. 
The open seminar was conceived by 
Don Law, Jr., an undergraduate at 
the university which has 250 students 
enrolled. 

The series will explore current 
trends in American pop music. Several 
Borwin Music writers will assist 
Catron in his presentation. 


I EMS Changes Image 

I NEW YORK — Riding on the popular- 
ity of their current MGM single, “No 
One Knows,” Every Mothers’ Son is 
in the throes of major changes con- 
cerning their career. The once colle- 
giate-type group has begun to go the 
long hair — far out clothes route and 
has recently been playing such New 
York bastions of hippiedelia as the 
Group Image and Steve Paul’s the 
Scene. 

The first changes began to take 
place in Mid-Dec. when Don Kerr re- 
placed Schuyler Larsen at the bass. 
Kerr was formerly with Neil Dia- 
mond’s back up group. Lary Larden, 
leader of EMS, maintains that the 
change in the group’s sound is due 
primarily to the bass of Don Kerr and 
the new drum set up of Christopher 
Augustine. 


Elektra Records Names 
Haeny Chief Engineer 

NEW YORK — Elektra Records has 
appointed John Haeny chief engineer, 
according to Jac Holzman, president 
of the label. 

In this capacity, Haeny will be 
active in recording and mixing ses- 
sions on both coasts, and will be 
responsible for equipment, operating 
personnel, and quality of recording 
for Elektra. He is currently involved 
in the construction of Elektra’s new 
Los Angeles studio, and expanding 
Elektra’s New York engineering facil- 
ities. Haeny’s first recording project 
with Elektra was the new Judy Col- 
lins album, “Wildflowers.” 

Prior to his Elektra appointment, 
Haeny, who is 26, was a staff mixer 
at the United and Western Recording 
Studios in Hollywood, having come 
there from the mixing staff of Holly- 
wood’s RCA Victor Studios. 


Bland Disk Split 

HOLLYWOOD— Bobby Bland’s cur- 
rent single, “Drifting” b/w “Piece Of 
Gold,” has been receiving so much 
split play that Duke Peacock Records 
has issued two new singles using 
“Drifting” and “Piece Of Gold” as the 
‘A’ side on each. 


Gaudio Co-Cleffer 
Of Valli’s Hits 

NEW YORK — Bob Gaudio is a co- 
writer with Bob Crewe on the recent 
Frankie Valli hit, “Can’t Get My Eyes 
Off of You.” Crewe was given sole 
credit in a story on Crewe’s west coast 
expansion in last week’s issue Pair 
also penned Valli’s follow-up hit, “To 
Give.” 



A LITTLC BIT OB COLOUR... TOMORROT^ 


• 

///TlivyS /TrlWy^ 

nt \\\\ ///n \\\\ /// / \ vv\ 

CoshBox Sure Shots 

'\\\'{ iTiNun 1 1 }fi\\\ wnu 
\u\ //// WW /777 Vu\i/w 
wwt//// wwi//// wwi;/// 

'TOTTOT 

The Cash Box "Sure Shots" highlight records which reports 
nation indicate are already beginning to sell quantity or else 

from retail 
give every 

dealers throughout the 
indication of doing so. 

THE END OF OUR ROAD 

Gladys Knight & Pips 



Soul 35042 

MEN ARE GETTIN' SCARCE 

Joe Tex 



Dial 4069 

THE CLICK SONG NUMBER 

Cher 

ONE 



GOT WHAT YOU NEED 

Fantastic Johnny C 


Phil 

L.A. Of Soul 309 

IN THE MIDNIGHT HOUR 

Mirettes 




LA-LA MEANS 1 LOVE YOU 

Delfonics 



Philly Groove 1 50 

THE BALLAD OF BONNIE & 

Georgie Fame 

CLYDE 


Epic 10283 

LOVE IS BLUE 

Al Martino 





Jim Gearhart Completes 
First Comedy Recording 

NEW YORK — Philadelphia-New York 
deejay Jim Gearhart has completed 
his first album under the production 
of Chappell & Co. and Cochran-Man- 
gum Productions. These firms were 
responsible for launching Senator 
Everett M. Dirksen’s recording career 
and debuting Ed McMahon on LP’s. 

Gearhart, who has capitalized on 
telephone “put-on” material, will be 
featured on the set titled “Put Him 
On Please.” Album will be issued by 
Premier Albums on the Award label, 
and includes background music pub- 
lished by Chappell. Both the publisher 
and label have been mapping out a 
promotional campaign centered at the 
radio level. 

Los Angeles, Chicago, Detroit, and 
Cleveland have been set as the four 
initial release cities, with Chappell 
reps to receive 50 rush LP copies in 
each market for the saturation radio 
drive. 

Gearhart became a widely-known 
figure with his on-the-air antics on 
the Quaker City’s WFIL radio with 
such campaigns as a National Dairy 
Month “take a cow to dinner” drive, 
as well as with a city-wide “chicken- 
throwing contest.” Eventually he de- 
veloped his now-famous “put-on tele- 
phone call” routine, in which unsus- 
pecting listeners are called and put 
on in a way that seems obvious to 
nearly everyone but the recipient of 
the phone call himself. 

Gearhart made his way to WCBS 
radio, whose subsequent move into the 
all-news format gave him an unexpec- 
ted vacation pending his new assign- 
ment on WNBC radio this week (29). 



THEY CAN FLY— The Cowsills, 
MUM’s big singing family, pause just 
prior to leaving JFK for a singing 
tour of Europe. They are set for a 
featured shot at the San Remo Song 
Festival. The floral airplane inscribed 
with the name of their latest deck, 
“We Can Fly,” is a bon voyage gift 
from Ed Sullivan. 



THE PRINCE OF HEARTS— Dyno 
Voice’s Mitch Ryder (left) is presented 
with the Heart & Torch symbol of 
the American Heart Association by 
William F. Laporte, chairman of the 
’68 Heart Fund campaign. Named 
“Prince Of Hearts,” Ryder will serve 
throughout the year as the Heart 
Assoc. ’s representative to America’s 
youth and will be especially active 
on behalf of Heart Fund drive. The 
drive will be conducted in Feb., which 
is also “American Heart Month.” 


Compass Sets Ferguson 
Tour; Pushes Her New Lid 

NEW YORK — With “Trespassin’,” by 
the Ohio Players already getting ac- 
tion on Cash Box’s Looking Ahead 
chart. Compass Records is planning 
a promo tour of key markets for lark 
Helena Ferguson to tie in with her 
new single for the diskery. 

Miss Ferguson enjoyed a chart hit 
recently with her initial Compass re- 
lease, “Where Is The Party.” 

The new coupling, produced by Lin- 
coln Kilpatrick’s Dakar Productions, 
includes “The Loneliness (Is Coming 
Again)” and “Don’t Spoil Our Good 
Thing.” Compass president Mickey 
Kapp, announcing the disk, asserted, 
“We’re putting stars on both sides of 
this one. That’s our way of saying we 
feel these tunes, contrasting as they 
ai’e, can both wind up near the top. 
We thing it’s a two-sided recorJ all 
the way.” 

The deck was released last Friday 
(19), with the singer due to leave on 
her tour shortly. Initial stop is expec- 
ted to be Philadelphia, where several 
TV appearances are said to be in the 
works. 



A r 





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36 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 




“ For Your Love’ ’-The Yardbirds 
“No MilkToday’’- Herman’s Hermits 
“Behind the Door’’- Cher 
“Pamela, Pamela’ ’-Wayne Fontana i 
“Bus Stop’’-The Hollies 


These great hits have 
one thing in common. 
They were all written 
by Graham Gouldman... 

and now he makes 
his Victor singing debut 
with his newest song... 

“THE IMPOSSIBLE YEARS” 

W‘No Milk Today”*9453 


February 10, 1968 


37 


Curt Massey: Behind The Screen 
Musical Doings For Ex-Performer 


HOLLYWOOD— Curt Massey is a for- 
mer radio and TV singer whose mu- 
sical creativity has evolved success- 
fully from the performing to the pro- 
duction end of broadcasting.^ 

Massey is musical director for CBS 
network sho'ws “Petticoat Junction” 
and “Beverly Hillbillies,” but he adds 
moi'e than just direction. 

Home Style Scores 

The Massey theory of musical direc- 
torship demands that the composing, 
arranging, playing and recording of 
all music be done by Massey— in his 
own home. And when the occasion de- 
mands, he lends his voice to a sound 
track. 

The second floor of Massey’s Span- 
ish-style hacienda hosts a two-room 
air-conditioned studio. One room is for 
performers, and the other holds his 
professional audio recording equip- 
ment. 

A $25,000 investment, the audio re- 
cording equipment includes an 8-track 
and a 4-track Ampex AG-300, micro- 
phones and an Ampex AG-351, on 
which the finished sound tracks are re- 
corded and sent to Filmways Studio in 
Hollywood, producer of the two tele- 
vision comedies. The Ampex AG-300 
recorders record singing and music on 
individual tracks, which are then mixed 
to create the final product. Filmways 
synchronizes the audio and video. 

All original music used on “Petti- 
coat Junction” and “Beverly Hillbil- 
lies” is composed and arranged by 
Massey, and singers for the two pro- 
grams gather at Massey’s home so 
that the tapes may be produced in his 
studio. 

When it comes to musical instru- 
ments, almost invariably the per- 
former heard on both shows is Mas- 
sey. He plays piano, violin, trumpet, 
guitar, banjo, clavietta, mellophone, 


xylophone, celeste and French horn. 

The trumpet, piano and clavietta 
heard in the “Petticoat Junction” 
theme were recorded on different 
tracks of Massey’s four-track unit. 
He wrote the theme song, and the sin- 
ger is — guess who? 

Paul Henning, creator of the two 
comedies and executive producer of 
“Green Acres,” offered Massey the 
“Petticoat Junction” position which 
necessitated his giving up his NBC 
television program, “The Curt Massey 
Show.” 

After making sure the personnel 
connection with his TV show would be 
able to find other jobs, Massey ac- 
cepted Henning’s offer, and was with 
the “Petticoat” crew at the program’s 
inception in 1963. His NBC-TV show 
ended in early 1964. Massey added the 
musical directorship of “Beverly Hill- 
billies” in the fall of 1964. 

The tireless Massey commonly 
works 14 or more hours a day, but 
professes no exhaustion, despite his 
57 years of age. 

Musical Family 

Massey comes from a musical fam- 
ily. His father was widely recognized 
as a country-style fiddler, and his six 
brothers and one sister also became 
professional musicians. 

While attending a Kansas City, Mis- 
souri, music conservatory, Massey 
worked as a radio actor at the local 
CBS affiliate station, KMBC. At the 
same time he performed with the Play- 
Mor Ballroom orchestra, and became 
its leader at the age of 20. 

Massey continued with radio music, 
and went on the air in 1949 with “The 
Curt Massey Show” on CBS, NBC, 
Mutual and the Armed Forces Net- 
work five days a week. In 1956 the 
Hollywood-based program moved to 
television under the aegis of NBC. 



IT’S NOT IMPOSSIBLE— Greg Mor- 
ris, co-star of the CBS-TV’er “Mission 
Impossible,” has signed an exclusive, 
long-term recording pact with Dot. 
A debut album will be cut next week 
in H’wood by Dot’s east coast A&R 
director, Gerry Granahan. Shown here 
(from the left) are: Gerry Granahan; 
Greg Morris; Richard Peirce, label’s 
vice president and general manager; 
and Arnold Burk, vice president of 
Paramount Pictures and president of 
Dot Records. 


Wisserf Calls Last Year 
His Most Successful Yet 

NEW YORK — Koppelman-Rubin’s 
executive producer Joe Wissert called 
last year his most successful in the 
record business. Major hits in recent 
months have come from productions 
for the Turtles and the Lovin’ Spoon- 
ful. 

Although the Turtles had not come 
up with a hit in about a year when 
Wissert started producing them, the 
team connected for million seller sta- 
tus with “Happy Together” and have 
strung out a series of big sides since 
then including “She’d Rather Be With 
Me,” “You Know What I Mean,” and 
“She’s My Girl.” Wissert assigns a 
large part of the success for these rec- 
ords to the arrangers he worked with: 
Nick DeCarlo and Jack Nitzsche, 
whom he considers among the best in 
the country. 

Wissert’s involvement with the Lov- 
in’ Spoonful is a recent development, 
begun with “She’s Still A Mystery.” 
He also worked on their current 
“Money” single and the recently re- 
leased “Everything Playing” album. 



Lib's 'Million $' 

Winners Announced 

LOS ANGELES — Bud Dain, general 
manager of Liberty Records, last week 
announced the winners in Liberty’s 
“Million Dollar Weekend” contest for 
dealers, distributors and salesmen. 

Each contestant had to write in 200 
words or less how he would spend a 
“Million Dollar Weekend.” 

The winners are Darwin R. Meyers 
of Heilicher Bros Inc. in Minneapolis, 
Jack Geldbart of L & P Record Serv- 
ice in Atlanta and Leonard M. Chap- 
man of Liberty Records Distributing- 
Corporation of New York. 

The winners and their wives will 
be flown to Las Vegas to spend an all- 
expense paid “Million Dollar Week- 
end,” Feb. 2, 3 and 4. 

The weekend will include luxury ac- 
commodations at Caesar’s Palace Ho- 
tel in Las Vegas, two floor shows, a 
special sight-seeing tour of the Las 
Vegas area, including Boulder Dam, 
and $200 in chips. 

The “Million Dollar Weekend” con- 
test was part of a promotion of the 
Ventures’ latest Liberty album, “Mil- 
lion Dollar Weekend.” 

The promotion consisted of the con- 
test, extensive national radio advertis- 
ing and special Ventures “Million Dol- 
lar Weekend” displays for the retail 
outlets. 

The promotion was coordinated by 
Dain, national sales, director Jack 
Bratel, and national promotion direc- 
tor Dennis Ganim. 


Golf Tourney To Benefit 

NEW YORK — Andy Williams has 
stated that proceeds from his Andy 
Williams San Diego Opening will go 
to the Salk Institute for Biological 
Research, La Jolla, California. 

The Columbia vocalist is holding his 
golf meet at the Torrey Pines Club 
next week (Feb. 8-11) and final two 
days will be telecast by NBC-TV. Pre- 
ceding the tournament a pro-am meet 
will be held including many celebrities 
from the entertainment world. Listed 
among the entrants are Perry Como, 
Danny Thomas, Jack Lemmon, Chuck 
Connors, Vic Damone, Robei-t Morse, 
Richard Crenna, Buddy Grecco, Robert 
Wagner, Fred MacMurray, John Raitt, 
Ricky Nelson, Tennessee Ernie Ford 
and Ray Bolger among others. Prelim- 
inary event features a $15,000 prize 
list and the Open offers $150,000. 

A special Andy Williams-Henry 
Mancini concert scheduled for the 
same week as part of the tournament 
activities will also benefit the Salk 
Institute. The sale of 3,000 seats for 
the performance in the San Diego Au- 
ditorium is scaled to raise $190,000. 

A longtime admirer of Dr. Salk’s 
humanitarian efforts, Williams last 
year donated the profits from his mil- 
lion-selling Columbia Records LP 
“Born Free” to further the work of 
the Salk Institute. 



TAPE LICENSEE NAMED — The 
Greentree Electronics Corp., a Bell & 
Howell firm, has been appointed ex- 
clusive licensee for the manufacture, 
distribution, and sale of all Libei’ty 
reel to reel product. The labels in- 
cluded in the agreement are Liberty, 
Imperial, Blue Note, World Pacific, 
Pacific Jazz, and Soul City. Shown go- 
ing over the contracts are: (from left 
to right) A1 Bennett, president of 
Liberty; Sidney Brandt, president of 
Greentree; and Lee Mendell, vice pi-esi- 
dent of Liberty. 


Atlantic, Hullabaloo Mag. 

In Joint Promo On Rascals 

NEW YORK — Atlantic Records and 
Hullabaloo Magazine have entered in- 
to a joint promotional venture on the 
Young Rascals. In an exclusive inter- 
view with Gerald Rothberg, publisher 
of Hullabaloo Magazine, Cash Box 
learned that, as part of the joint pro- 
motion, full size posters of the Ras- 
cals are being bound into the issue of 
Hullabaloo currently on the press. The 
magazine is also I'unning Young Ras- 
cals contests using Atlantic product 


as prizes. 

The promotion will utilize the fol- 
lowing racks: George Heartstone’s 

Recona Corp., Monroe Goodman’s Tip 
Top Record Service, Cecil Steen’s Rec- 
ordwagon, Charles Schlang’s Mershaw 
of America, and Louis & David Fried- 
man’s Sommerset Corp.; all of which 
are subsidiaries of Transcontinental 
Investing Corp., as is Hullabaloo Ma- 
gazine. 

Rothberg pointed out that this pro- 
motion on the Young Rascals is the 
first in a series of monthly coopera- 
tive promotions that the magazine 
plans to work out with major labels. 





BLOCK (ING) WHITE WHALE— 
Gene Block, new national sales man- 
ager for Muntz Stereo Pak, huddles 
with White Whale execs during recent 
recording session by the Turtles. 
Shown (from the left) are. Ed Michel, 
music director for Muntz Stereo Pak; 
Ted Feigin, White Whale; Gene Block; 
and Lee Lasseff, White Whale. 


Pacific Ocean Prod.'s 
Debuts In Hollywood 




HOLLYWOOD — Joe Leahy, Don 
Blocker, and Joe Gottfried have 
formed Pacific Ocean Productions 
here. The first act signed by P.O.P. is 
the American Brass Company, who will 
have their album released shortly on 
Viva Records. Additional artists 
signed by P.O.P. include the Beautiful 
People, a young singing, performing 
group, and other artists and musical 
concepts. An album is currently be- 
ing negotiated with several companies. 
P.O.P. will also engage in music pub- 
lishing and artists management. 




. S 


Motown's Jones 
Is Father Of Boy 

NEW YORK — Phil Jones, marketing 
director for Motown Records, and his 
wife, Minta, are the proud parents of 
a baby boy, Thomas Raymond Jones, 
born January 25. The lad weighed 8 V 2 
pounds. 

The Jones’ boy is the couple’s third . 
child, twin girls comprising the rest 
of the family. 


i 


i 



AND ALL THAT JAZZ— Bob Lis- 
sauer (right), president of Lissauer 
Music, poses with jazz pianist Muriel 
Roberts, recently signed by Lissauer 
to the firm. She formerly recorded with , 
Dot and Scepter and is set to handle 
the arranging chores on an LP that she 
and Lissauer are producing. 


F 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 









ALREADY A PRE - RELEASE HIT IN AUSTRALIA! 


NEW THRUST 


\ 

f 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


39 




CROC Realigns Sales Force: Bender VP 


HOLLYWOOD— Capitol Records Dis- 
tributing Corp. has realigned its sales 
responsibilities effective February 1, 
according to an announcement by Stan 
Gortikov, president of the company. 

Oris Beucler has been elected vice 
president of ORDC’s special markets 
division. Beucler will continue to be 
responsible for the procurement and 
marketing policies of special products, 
including phonographs, accepories, 
tape playback equipment, musical in- 
struments and other products as may 
be added in the futui’e. 

In his new position, Beucler will also 
be charged with the location, develop- 
ment and procurement of other new 
products for distribution through 



Oris Beucler 


CARAVAN 

Bert Kaempfert (Decca) 

Les Paul (London) 

Wes Montgomery (Verve) 

COUNT THE WAYS 

Society’s Children (Atco) 

SERENATA 

Sergio Franchi (RCA Victor) 

TALKING TO THE RAIN 

Jerry Shore (Philips) 

RED ROSES FOR A BLUE LADY 

Al Hirt (RCA Victor) 

Ernie Freeman (Dunhill) 

ALL MY LOVE 

Billy Vaughn (Dot) 

YOU'VE GOT YOUR TROUBLES 

Cab Callov/ay (P.I.P.) 

PLEASE SPEAK TO ME OF LOVE 

Earl Wilson, Jr (Mercury) 

LITTLE SUNSHINE 

Arnie Corrado (Columbia) 

WHO'S SORRY NOW 

Bobby Vinton (Epic) 

Guitar Underground . . . .(Project 3) 

THE SHEIK OF ARABY 
MOOD INDIGO 

Jim Kweskin Jug Band. . . .(Reprise) 

HOW COME YOU DO ME LIKE 
YOU DO? 

John Davidson (Columbia) 

STAR DUST 

STARS FELL ON ALABAMA 

Urbie Green/21 Trombones 

(Project 3) 

SOLITUDE 

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY 

Eileen Romey. .. .(Audio Fidelity) 

FIDDLE FADDLE & 14 OTHER 
LEROY ANDERSON FAVORITES 

Utah Symphony (Vanguard) 


■ ^ .A : s'o mills music, inc. 

1790 Broadway 
New York, N.Y. 10019 



' A.A 

pvakLCKiKe « 


CRDC or through any other appropri- 
ate distribution channels. In addition 
to his CRDC responsibilities, Beucler 
will provide advice and counsel in the 
marketing strategy of CRI’s creative 
product sales and custom sales activi- 
ties, headed by Harry Mynatt and Bud 
Harden, respectively. 

The national sales responsibility of 
all special products, including reel-to- 
reel and cartridge tape, will be shifted 
to CRDC’s national sales manager, vice 
president William B. Tallant, Jr. Roger 
Brown, as special products sales man- 
ager, will report directly to Tallant, as 
do all other product line sales man- 
agers. The purpose of these moves is 
to unify, clarify and simplify field 
sales relationships, selling procedures 
and customer relationships. 


Garrett Productions 
Buys Amigo Studios 

HOLLYWOOD — In an effort to avoid 
the spiraling costs of cutting acts and 
the protracted delays in scheduling 
dates, Garrett Productions has pur- 
chased Amigo Studios in north Holly- 
wood. Partners are Snuff Garrett, Ed 
Silvers and Steve Douglas, Mercury 
Records’ west coast A&R chief. 

Studio, which is equipped with Am- 
pex 8, Ampex 4 and monuaral decks, 
can accommodate up to 35 pieces and 
is currently operating on a full time 
basis. 

It’s open to outside dates, accord- 
ing to Ed Silvers, and such artists as 
Brian Hyland, the Electric Prunes, 
Tom Garrett’s 50 Guitars, the Mid- 
night String Quartet, Blue Cheer, and 
the Lennon Sisters have recently uti- 
lized its facilities. 

Currently the studio has a full time 
and part time engineer with “Doc” 
Babb administrating. 

Silvers estimates the value of the 
operation between $160,000 and $175,- 
000. “We’ve been in the black ever 
since we opened,” says Silvers. Studio 
was purchased a few weeks before 
Christmas. 


Record Acts To Key 
Gary TV Show Action 

MIAMI BEACH — John Gary’s up- 
coming series of 90-minute television 
shows will make wide use of record- 
oriented acts according to initial in- 
dications from personnel at work on 
the programs. 

Scheduled to begin taping shortly, 
the J ohn Gary Show is lining up talent 
to appear with performances of mate- 
rial and engage in conversation on a 
format akin to several of the “talk- 
sho\vs” now in popularity. Although 
making use of the ideas of programs 
like the Joey Bishop, Merv Griffin and 
Mike Douglas shows, more of the dis- 
cussions will be centered around the 
performance in a natural manner. No 
lounge chair setups will be used. 

Now in production by the Scripps- 
Howard/WGN Continental Produc- 
tions in association with Joseph Csida 
Enterprises, the Gary program will be 
syndicated nationally and interna- 
tionally with the intention of featur- 
ing artists in appearances that will be 
meaningful for promotion purposes. 
Acts vdll be paid scale for a nationally 
syndicated show. Markets in which the 
show will be kicked off during the first 
half of March include Chicago, Cin- 
cinnati, Cleveland, Miami, Palm Beach, 
Memphis, Denver and Duluth. New 
York and Los Angeles stations are 
now being lined up as well as outlets 
in ten other major markets. 

The John Gary Show will be done 
from the Hilton Plaza Hotel in Miami 
Beach with most programming to 
come from the Great Room and added 
shots taped around the Miami area. 
Sheldon Cooper is executive producer 
with working producers Al Schwartz 
and Hal Wallace. Herman Spero is 
talent coordinator. 




^ 

/jV/ UVl w/ /TTfn^ 

wSw ' ^ Locations 




1 

1 WISH IT WOULD RAIN 


26 

IF 1 COULD BUILD MY 



Temptations (Gordy 7068) 

1 


WORLD AROUND YOU 

Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell 






(Tamla 54156) 

18 ’ 

2 

WE'RE A WINNER 

Impressions (ABC 11022) 

7 

27 

NO SAD SONGS 

Joe Simon (Sound Stage 7-2602) 

32 . 

3 

TELL MAMA 

Etta James (Cadet 5578) 

2 

28 

THERE IS 









Dells (Cadet 5574) 

31 

4 

MY BABY MUST BE A 
MAGICIAN 


29 


4 


Marveletts (Tamla 54158) 

4 

STOP 

Howard Tate (Verve 10573) 

35 


5 

BACK UP TRAIN 


30 

BURNING STAR 

A 


Al Greene (Hot Line 15000) 

6 

36 


Soulful Strings (Cadet 5576) 

6 

THE DOCK OF THE BAY 


31 


4 

Otis Redding (Volt 157) 

9 

FUNKY WAY 

Calvin Anold (Venture 605) 

34 ^ 



7 

YOU 

Marvin Gaye (Tamla 54160) 

8 

32 

A MILION TO ONE 

-> ' 




Five Stairsteps (Buddah 26) 


8 

CHAIN OF FOOLS 


33 

DRIFTING BLUES 


Aretha Franklin (Atlantic 2464) 

3 





Bobby Bland (Duke 432) 

39 

9 

BORN FREE 


34 

DO WHAT YOU GOTTA DO 

1 

Hesitations (Kapp 878) 

10 





Al Wilson (Soul City 761) 

26 

10 

THERE WAS A TIME 


35 

MEN ARE GETTIN' SCARCE 

-c 

James Brown (King 6144) 

13 




Joe Tex (Dial 4069) 

11 

1 HEARD IT THRU THE 
GRAPE VINE 


36 

LOVEY DOVEY 

-Tf 


Gladys Knight & Pips (Soul 35039) 

5 

/ 


Otis & Carla (Stax 244) 

“-4 : 
\ 

12 

BABY NOW THAT I'VE 


37 

A WORKING MAN'S PRAYER 

4 


FOUND YOU 



Arthur Prysock (Verve 10574) 

29 


Foundations (Uni 55038) 

16 

38 

YOU DON'T HAVE TO SAY 

♦ 

13 

COUNT THE DAYS 



YOU LOVE ME 



Inez & Charlie Faxx (Dynamo 112) 

14 


4 Sonics (Spart 110) 

42 

14 

OH HOW IT HURTS 


39 

GOT WHAT YOU NEED 

A 

Barbara Mason (Arctic 137) 

15 


Fantastic Johnny C 
(Phil La Of Soul 309) 

— - 

15 

1 THANK YOU 


40 

IN THE MIDNIGHT HOUR 

'V' 


Sam & Dave (Stax 242) 

25 

Mirettes (Review 11004) 

48 4 

16 

HONEY CHILE 


41 

LOOKING FOR A FOX 

-J 


Martha Reeves & Vandellas 
(Gordy 7067) 

11 

Clarence Carter (Atlantic 2461) 

4 

T 

17 

WALK AWAY RENEE 


42 

LICKIN' STICK 

1 

4 Tops (Motown 1119) 

37 


George Torrence & Natural (Shout 224) 44 | 

9 

18 

VALLEY OF THE DOLLS 


43 

I'M GONNA MAKE YOU 

1 

Dionne Warwick (Scepter 12203) 

27 


LOVE ME 





Madeline Bell (Mod 1007) 

49 j 

19 

COME SEE ABOUT ME 


44 

TRESPASSIN' 


Jr. Walkers & The All Stars 


9 


(Soul 35041) 

12 


Ohio Players (Compass 7015) 

46 

20 

WOMAN WOMAN 


45 

COLD FEET 

1 


Union Gap (Columbia 44297) 

23 


Albert King (Stax 241) 


21 

A MAN NEEDS A WOMAN 


46 

WITHOUT LOVE 

45^ 

% 


James Carr (Goldwax 332) 

22 


Oscar Toney Jr. (Bell 699) 

22 

PIECE OF MY HEART 


47 

DANCE TO THE MUSIC 

M 

i 


Erma Franklin (Shout 221) 

21 


Sly & The Family (Epic 10256) 

< - 

23 

SPOOKY 


48 

1 NEED A WOMAN OF 


Classics IV (Imperial 66259) 

24 


MY OWN 

Tommy Hunt (Dynamo 13) 

40 ^ 


24 

1 SECOND THAT EMOTION 





Smdkey Robinson & Miracles 


49 

WOMAN WITH THE BLUES 

« 


(Tamla 54159) 

17 


Lamp Sisters (Duke 427) 

$ 

25 

THE END OF OUR ROAD 


50 

QUITTIN' TIME 


Gladys Knight & Pips (Soul 35042) 

41 


Big Maybelle (Rojac 118) 



Cash Box — February 10, 1968 



That First step is a big one. 

And it s already taken the first step up the charts. Over 
20,000 sold opening week in Philadelphia alone! Next 
step: the inevitable coast-to-coast climb for this highly 
original hit. Formerly on Bank Records, now on MGM 

At the top of the stairs 

I K-13899 


THE FORMATIONS® 

Produced by Leon Huff for John Madara Productions in association with Bank Records MGM 

RECORDS 







‘■'V. 






LONDON ON AMPEX — London Records and Ampex have just signed a new 
long-term licensing agreement whereby Ampex will have the right to issue on 
tape in the U.S., all London product as well as that of London’s subsidiary 
labels: Parrot, Deram, and Hi. The agreement covers all types of pre-recorded 
tape format, and London’s product will be issued by Ampex in all four currently 
leading configurations: open reel, cassette, and cartridges in both 4 and 8 
track. Shown here are Marty Wargo (right), London’s director of administra- 
tion, and Don Hall (left), general manager of Ampex Stereo Tapes, who 
handled the contractoral negotiations. 


Singing Sideline Sweetens 
Coffee Chanteuse’s Career 

NEW YORK — Known to many as 
“the lady in the coffee ad,” Page 
Morton is now stepping up her sing- 
ing career with promotional visits to 
several cities for her new Audio 
Fidelity single. 

Until recently Miss Morton was 
more occupied with the world of high 
finance and focused her attention on 
business and economics, but initial 
reaction to her easy listening release, 
“Time,” has brought music to the fore 
in her current interest. She will be 
visiting several cities along the East- 
ern seaboard and in California for 
personal appearances on radio and 
television interview shows and visits 
to programming personnel. 

From entertainment beginnings as 
a supperclub pianist-singer. Miss 
Morton rose to appear in several of 
the leading spots in New York and 
was spotlighted as feature soloist 
with a Guy Lombardo New Year’s Eve 
telecast. 

More recently, she dismissed sing- 
ing for other interests such as dress 
and hat designing, working with her 
husband in financial affairs, and aid- 
ing charity functions. She is an officer 
of the Parkinson’s Disease Founda- 
tion, and affiliated with the Visiting 
Nurses Association of New York. 

Appearance in the Chock Full 
O’Nuts coffee commercial and a 
chance meeting with composer Eddie 
White (“C’est La Vie”) rekindled 
music interest, and led to the release 
of “Story in the Wind” and her new 
single, “Time.” She is also working 
on an LP to be completed in the near 
future. 


Apple Pie Motherhood Band 
Inked By Atlantic Records 

NEW YORK— The Apple Pie Mother- 
hood Band, a Boston group, has been 
signed by Atlantic Records to a long 
term contract. 

First Atlantic record by the group 
is called “Long Live Apple Pie”. Tune 
was written by Jef Labes, a member 
of the group. Lid has just been re- 
leased. 

The Apple Pie Motherhood Band 
consists of : Ted Demos, Dick Barnaby, 
Ann Tansey, Jackie Bruno, Jef Labes, 
and Joe Castagno. They will be per- 
forming in Boston February 16th and 
17th at The Tea Party. On February 
22 through 24th they will be perform- 
’ng at The Electric Factory in Phila- 
delphia. The group is appearing on 
rv this week on the syndicated UP- 
BEAT Show and The Robin Seymour 
Show. 


Reprise Inks Rydell 

BURBANK — Reprise Records has 
signed Bobby Rydell to an exclusive 
recording contract, according to an 
announcement by general manager 
Mo Ostin. Rydell, recently returned 
from a six-week tour in Australia, has 
been recording for 10 years. Most re- 
cently he was with Capitol Records, 
snd prior to that association, waxed 
for Cameo Parkway Records. 

Initial disk for Reprise is “The 
Lovin’ Things,” which was produced 
bv Dave Hassinger. Rydell recorded 
the million seller “Wild One.” 


Bobbie Gentry To 
Perform At San Remo 

HOLLYWOOD — Capitol Records’ 
songstress Bobbie Gentry will intro- 
duce a new Italian sone, “La Siene.” 
at the forthcoming San Remo Festival. 
Her Italian partner at the Festival, 
who will also introduce “La Siepe” is 
Italy’s star male vocalist A1 Bano, an 
EMI Italiana artist. 

Bobbie Gentry and Bob Klein, mer- 
chandising director of Caoitol’s inter- 
national division, arrived in San Remo 
yesterday (28). Miss Gentry is cur- 
rently rehearsing for the Festival, 
which takes place Feb. 1st, 2nd and 
3rd. 

In order to have Miss Gentry’s ver- 
sion of “La Siepe” recorded and ready 
for sale in Italv the day after the Fes- 
tival, Canitol had John Lee, head of 
EMI Jtaliana’s A&R Department, flv 
to Hollywood to assist Miss Gentry 
and her A&R producer, Kelly Gordon 
in the recording of the tune. The ses- 
sion was finished Jan. 19 and T.ee flew 
back to Italy Jan. 20 with the taoe. 
The record will be available for sale 
in Italy on February 5th. 

Capitol’s publishine arm. B-^echwood 
Music (BMI) has obtaiued the rie-hta 
to “La Siepe” for the U.S.. and will 
have Miss Gentry write Enelish lyrics 
for a future release of the song on 
Capitol. 


Caoitol AD Deal Set 

NEW YORK — The mereer of Canitol 
Records and Audio Devices has been 
signed, accordinsr to Alan Livingston, 
president of Capitol, and William T. 
Hack, president of Audio Devices. 
Merger, yet to be approved by Audio 
Devices shareholders and various 
state and federal regulatory agencies, 
involves, as previously announced, 
the issuance to Capitol stockholders 
of about 3,119,000 shares of common 
stock of Audio Devices. 


April/ Blackwood Inks Guryan 
As Writer-Artist & Producer 

NEW YORK — Margo Guryan, com- 
poser of “Sunday Mornin’,” has been 
signed to April /Blackwood with an ex- 
clusive contract as a writer, and to the 
Daylight Productions arm with a re- 
cording-producing pact. 

Speaking of her talent, A/B vice 
president and general manager Neil 
Anderson, said that although her 
“Sunday Mornin’ ” composition, re- 
corded by Spanky & Our Gang, is Miss 
Guryan’s first hit, she is becoming one 
of the most sought after writers 
around. The publishing firm has al- 
ready received many requests for her 
material including “Think of Rain,” 
recorded by the Cyrkle, Claudine Lon- 
get, Jackie De Shannon and Nilsson. 

Her background includes a familiar- 
ity with many forms of music. Miss 
Guryan has a Bachelor of Arts degree 
in Music from Boston University and 
she has studied at the Lenox School 
of Jazz with Gunther Schuller. Prior 
to joining April /Blackwood, she was 
cn the staff of MJQ Music where she 
wrote lyrics to the compositions of 
Gary McFarland, Ornette Coleman and 
John Lewis while writing her own 
music. She is also an accomplished 
vocalist, arranger and pianist. 


Epic Inks Comedienne 


NEW YORK — Epic Records has signed 
new comedienne Donna Jean Young to 
an exclusive recording contract, David 
Kapralik, vice president of A&R for 
the label, has announced. Miss Young’s 
first album will be recorded live at the 
East McKeesport High School in her 
hometown of East McKeesport, Penn- 
sylvania, on February 6. 

Donna Jean Young has appeared 
extensively on major television shows 



Young & Kapralik 


and in numerous clubs throughout the 
country. Her first television appear- 
ance was on the Merv Griffin Show, 
and since then she has been a frequent 
guest. She was a regular on the Dean 
Martin Summer Show, and other tele- 
vision shows to her credit include the 
Mike Douglas Show, Hollywood Pal- 
ace, the Pat Boone Show, the Gypsy 
Rose Lee Show, the Woody Woodbury 
Show and Operation Entertainment. 

Miss Young is slated for a second 
appearance on Operation Entertain- 
ment on February 2nd and will be 
seen March 6th on the Jonathan Win- 
ters Show. 

At the age of 14 the comedienne re- 
ceived a scholarship to the Pittsburgh 
Playhouse and studied acting there for 
two years. She made her first profes- 
sional appearance at the Village Barn 
in New York, and, to date, she has 
appeared at such varied clubs as the 
Cellar Door in Washington, D.C., the 
Blue Angel, the Riviera in Los An- 
geles, Harrah’s in Reno and Tahoe, the 
Doral Beach in Miami and the Holiday 
House in Pittsburgh, six miles outside 
of East McKeesport. 


Ranwood To Release 
All Telekiew Product' 

HOLLYWOOD — Ranwood Records, 
the new company recently founded by 
Randy Wood, will henceforth release 
and distribute all music for Lawrence 
Welk’s company. Telekiew Produc- 
tions. 

All artists under contract to the 
Welk organization will be a part of 
this package. 

Welk’s association with Dot Records 
dates back to 1959, and, prior to 
joining Dot, he was represented on 
Coral, Mercury and Decca. Dot’s cata- 
log includes approximately 50 Welk 
albums. 

His nationally televised ABC show 
is presently in its thirteenth season. 


Blue Note Announces 
Record Sales Figures 

LOS ANGELES — Mel Fuhrman, co- 
general manager of Liberty Records’ 
subsidiary jazz label. Blue Note, last 
week reported that Blue Note recorded 
the best sales figures in its history dur- 
ing the first half of fiscal 1968. 

The label’s most successful disks 
during the last six months of 1967 
were the “Alligator Boogaloo” single 
and album by Lou Donaldson. Both 
made national pop, jazz and R&B 
charts. 


4 

4 

- 4 ^ 


V- 






Blue Note released the new Donald- 
son album, “Mr. Shing-A-Ling,” this 
month. 

Other albums which showed good 
sales figures during the last half of 
1967 were, “Empty Foxhole” by Or- 
nette Coleman, “Something Personal” 
by Jack Wilson, “Sweet Honey Bee” 
by Duke Pearson, “Happenings” by 
Bobby Hutcherson and “Maiden Voy- 
age” by Herbie Hancock. 

Blue Note reports action with a new 
single by the Three Sounds, “Making 
Bread Again.” 

Blue Note artists were again in 
1967 well represented in the jazz polls 
published by Playboy Magazine, Jazz 
and Pop Magazine and Down Beat 
Magazine. Artists honored by the vari- 
ous polls included, Ornette Coleman, 
Jack Wilson, Horace Silver, Freddie 
Hubbard, Don Cherry, Wayne Hender- 
son, Jackie McLean, Wayne Shorter, 
Herbie Hancock, McCoy Tyner, John 
Patton, Bobby Hutcherson and Art 
Blakey. 

“Blue Note is re-channeling 100 key 
catalogue items to stereo,” Fuhrman 
said. “We had such a number of re- 
quests for stereo albums of product 
that had only been available in mono 
that we decided to make all key prod- 
uct available in stereo.” 


Two Colgems Flick Scores 
Get Academy Award Noms 

NEW YORK — Academy Award nom- 
inations have been received by two 
original motion picture scores released 
last week on the Colgems label. Quincy 
Jones, the composer of the music from 
the picture “In Cold Blood,” has been 
nominated for an award in the “Best 
Motion Picture Score” category, and 
DeVol, composer of the original music 
from the motion picture “Guess Who’s 
Coming To Dinner,” has been nomin- 
ated in the “Music-Best Treatment or 
Adaptation” category. Additionally 
both films are top contenders for Aca- 
demy Awards in several other major 
categories. 

Single recordings from each of the 
motion picture scores have been sched- 
uled for release. From “In Cold Blood,” 
the single is titled, “Lonely Bottles” 
c/w “Hangin’ Paper,” and the “Theme 
From Guess Who’s Coming To Din- 
nerr” c/w “The Glory Of Love (vo- 
cal),” from “Guess Who’s Coming To 
Dinner.” 

Although both movies have opened 
so far in a few key cities throughout 
the country, they have reportedly 
broken all house attendance records 
wherever they have played and are 
listed among the top grossing films in 
the industry. 





42 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 





-f 

^ i 

^43 ^ 


OCTOBER COUNTRY? 


A FANTASTIC GROUP 


A HIT SINGLE 


5-10252 







Talent On Stage 


JACK JONES 


THIS IS THE SCENE — Columbia recently hosted a party at Steve Paul’s 
New York nitery, the Scene, to celebrate the New York opening of the new 
pop act, Spirit. Their first LP was released last week. They are produced by 
Lou Adler, vice president of Ode Records. Top photo (1. to r.) Robert Cato, 
vice president of creative services at CBS Records; Lou Adler; Jill Gibson; 
and Clive Davis, president of CBS Records. Middle photo (1. to r.) Tom Noonan, 
CBS director of national promotion, and Laura Nyro, Columbia recording art- 
ist. Bottom photo shows Spirit in action at the Scene. 


Connoisseur Society 
Releases Six LP's 
For February 

NEW YORK — Connoisseur Society is 
issuing six albums this month. They 
are as follows: “Predawn To Sunrise 
Ragas,” Ustad Ali Akbar Khan; “Bee- 
thoven: Sonata In F Minor, Opus 57, 
‘Appassionata;’ Sonata In E Minor, 
Opus 90;” “32 Variations On An Orig- 
inal Theme,” Ivan Moravec, piano; 
“The Transcendental Tal,” Pandit Ma- 
hapurush Misra; “Mozart Fantasi And 
Sonata In C Minor, K. 475 And K. 
457; Sonata In B Flat Major, K. 570,” 
Ivan Moravec; “Music From The Fes- 
tival Of Saintes Marie De La Mer,” 
Manitas de Plata, flamenco guitar; and 
“Raga Kirwani; Raga Imni Bilawal,” 
Rajdulari Aliakbar Khan. 


NEW YORK — Jack Jones, who con- 
fesses to being a “father dropper,” 
meaning that he always introduces his 
dad, Allan (“Donkey Serenade”) 
Jones, at his opening night gigs, is 
also a “dropper” of decided pleas- 
antries in song and patter. His current 
New York stand is at the Copacabana, 
where he’s denying the myth that a 
good new song is hard to find. Which 
brings us to his closing number, which 
happens to be his latest RCA singles 
release and one of the most persuasive 
songs written by Tony (“Downtown,” 
“Who Am I”) Hatch. It’s called “If 
You Ever Leave Me,” not, as Jack ob- 


serves, to be confused with“Camelot’s”i 
“If Ever I Would Leave You.” 

Much of what precedes this number [L 
connects with the audience. He gives f 
new poignancy to the Tommy Dorsey j 
theme song, “I’m Getting Sentimentalj 
Over You,” a sense of social meaning] 
to Oscar Brown, Jr.’s “Brother, Where 
Are You” and a touching account of 
“Alfie.” Lighter moments include 
“Hard Day’s Night,” “Am I Blue,” 
“She Loves Me” and “Donkey Sere- 
nade.” Latter may not be done son- 
like-father, but there is no doubt that, 
like many others, father-likes-son in 
song. 


STOPPED BY TO VISIT— Warner 
Bros./Reprise promo man Carl Deane 
and Bobby Rydell (right) stopped up 
to the Cash Box offices to play the 
latest 1st Reprise single, “The Lovin’ 
Things.” 


Hashberry, Dacca, Cadet 
Deal Sets Promo Film Dates 

NEW YORK — In a new series of com- 
pleted negotiations, the film produc- 
tion arm of the Hashberry Group has 
firmed contracts with both the Decca 
and Cadet record labels to produce 
promotional films for distribution to 
TV deejay shows throughout the coun- 
try and TV outlets abroad. The an- 
nouncement was made by Hashberry 
prexy Hank Schwartz. Hashberry is 
in production of the first film for Decca 
Records with the Decca recording 
group, the Hobbits performing their 
latest record. The film is scheduled for 
release along with the record provid- 
ing a promotional tool to be used to 
kick off extensive exposure of the Hob- 
bits campaign. 

Commenting on the deal with Hash- 
berry, Decca sources said that the pro- 
duction resources and experiences of 
Hashberry producers permitted a film 
to be created, produced and released 
simultaneously with a new record that 
was just starting its climb on the 
charts. 

Cadet’s first film with Hashberry 
will be of the Dells performing their 
chart single “There Is.” The film will 
be distributed by Hashberry to leading 
deejay programs. 

Hashberry indicated there are sev- 
eral other film deals pending with 
other major labels. Schwartz pointed 
out that Hashberry can achieve major 
distribution and exposure for films 
produced by his company because his 
company represents a continuous 
source of supply of film product to 
TV deejays. 


Chris Whorf To Head 
Dot's New Art Dept. 

LOS ANGELEiS — Dot Records’ ad- 
vertising-merchandising department is 
adding an internal art set-up, accord- 
ing to an announcement by Jack L^ 
Levy, the label’s advertising-merchan- 
dising director. Construction is pres- 
ently underway. Simultaneously, Levy 
named Christopher Whorf to head the 
new internal service as art director, ef- 
fective immediately. 

“Whorf will be responsible for the 
control of Dot’s new corporate look, __ 
encompassing advertising, album cov-lf t 
ers and sales aids, said Levy. “Hel 
brings to the company an excellent -• 
background in graphics and design, in-l;j 
fluenced by a very artistic family, in-j 1 
eluding his uncle, famed painter Johnl! 
Whorf, his brother Pete, award win-a| 
ning art director and his father, thej^ 
late actor-director Richard Whorf.” 

Prior to his graduation from Stan- J 
ford University in 1962, Whorf accept- | 
ed assignments with designer Charles , 
Eames on the UjS. Pavillion at the Se- ] 
attle World’s Fair, and the I.B.M. Pa- 1 
villion at the New York World’s Fair. | 
He then was engaged by CBS-TV i 
Films, for their documentary series, I 
“The Fabulous Fifties.” 


Christopher Whorf 


LONG ON SERVICE 


a RECORD PLATING SPECIALISTS 

0NG WEAR STAMPER CORE 

:4f 36thSLLong Island City, N.Y.11106 212 EX2-4718 


(Continued from page 8) ‘ 

300,000 more copies of the disk after 
the TV transmission (he claims a total 
of 800,000 copies of the disk sold in 
German). With regard to TV, Martino 
is content to perform abroad solely 
as a TV performer, since he states 
that “TV has taken over in Europe” 
as a prime exposure of talent. 

Before his strong comeback on the 
American scene eight years ago, Mar- 
tino was living in England, where he, 
achieved notable success. Many of hist 
successes there, he notes, were the! 
result of covering hits from the States,^ 
and scoring in England by virtue of 
getting them to market first. 

Martino’s latest Capitol recording is 
the vocal version of the Paul Mauriat 
hit, “Love is Blue.” 


44 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 




t, 












’HIE GOOD, THE BADiTHE U6LT 


UA Single ^50256 



THE BAD 


HOLWES. 




"'1: ,1: M1*i r*' sirip nii5» 


and His 


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NOW LEROY H0 LMES’newai 3 um: 

”THE GOOD, THE BAD g THE UGLY” 


e f- 


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THEMES EACH CUT 
A STANDOUT SINGLE 


Currently Climbing The Charts: 
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UAS 6608 


-3ash Box — February 10, 1968 


4 



Taieni On Staff e 


BILL 

NEW YORK — On Sunday evening, I 
January 28, at Philharmonic Hall, 
Bill Cosby gave striking evidence of 
his comic talents. On the basis of 
his perfoiTnance, it is easy to see why 
his comedy albums for Warner Bros.- 
Seven Arts Records are all chart 
items. 

Cosby’s humor is warm, affection- 
ate, and appealing. It deals with his 
childhood in north Philadelphia and 
with his family and friends. The 
comedian presented hilarious sketches 
of the nO'W famous Weird Harold and 
Fat Albert, his boyhood pals. He 
painted a portrait of his father as an 
awe-inspiring figure who commanded 
the instant obedience and respect of 
Bill and his brothers. The lion-like 
sound of Cosby *pere’ that the comic 
emitted through skillful use of the 
microphone was a little short of 
terrifying. 

One anecdote in particular was 
especially effective. It had to do with 
the theft of a five-foot figure of 
Frankenstein from a movie theater by 
Cosby’s chums. The replica of the 
monster is set up on a staircase land- 


COSBY 

ing and Cosby is led up the stairs by 
his pals to view it in the dark. 
Frightened out of his wits, Cosby 
turns around and makes Fat Albert 
the victim of the same prank, only 
to make the mistake of standing 
behind his huge friend. He winds up 
being trampled upon. 

Cosby, in a series of wry stories 
about his two young daughters, dis- 
played his affection for his children, 
even though he claimed that it is 
dangerous for the father of a two- 
year-old-girl to go to sleep on the 
couch when she is in the room. The 
performer emulated his diabolical 
child handing her snoozing dad a 
dynamite stick as she smiles angelic- 
ally all the while. 

The definitive word for Cosby’s 
comedy is healthy. Here is a man 
celebrating the joys and tribulations 
of childhood, parenthood, and life in 
general with a positive feeling for 
the goodness of being alive. It is most 
refreshing to see and hear such affir- 
mation in these days of dark and 
doom. 


SERGIO MENDES & BRASIL '66 
FIFTH DIMENSION 


NEW YORK — Springing surprises 
from start to finish, Sergio Mendes 
and Brazil ’66 offered more than any- 
one expected on the Saturday (27) 
double-concert show at Lincoln Cen- 
ter’s Philharmonic Hall. Along with 
the extra attraction appearance of the 
Fifth Dimension, an unscheduled 
comic opened the show, and Herbie 
Mann popped in for a one-set per- 
formance that nearly walked away 
with the evening. 

Everything about the program 
glittered. Anticipated favorites came 
off with crisp clarity and more-than- 
record presence; special songs and 
between number patter were present- 
ed with adept artistry; and the per- 
sonality projected by both of the acts 
was an added plus of magnitude that 
could never have been predicted. 

Both acts are among the most 
broadly-appealing on the current pO'P 
music scene, ca,pturing elements of 
blues, jazz, rock and soft-listening 
music and blending these trends into 
a uniformly appealing new sound 
which retains appeal to all followers 
of each style. Aimed at the teen and 
young adult market, the Fifth Dimen- 
sion connects with material that hits 
dance fans and offers lively listening 
for naiddle-of-the-road formats. Serg- 
io Mendes is among the most vivid of 
Brazilian musicians and his material 
has a peppier approach to bossa nova- 
samba than most giving him an “in” 
with younger listeners that has never 
been fully achieved by the older and 
more sedate performers of this music. 

Foremost in the display of versa- 
tility was the vari-hued 5th D, whose 
material ran from “Land of 1000 
Dances” (with the group leaving the 
stage to choose dancing partners 
from the audience) to a dramatic 
presentation of “Ode to Billie Joe” 
which might be termed a short-story 
in drama fonn rather than a song. 
Another vignette staging for “On 
Broadway” was a spectacular display 
of far more than singing talent, as 
was the choreography used with num- 


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BROADWAY 

A Few Fine Offices Available 

Agent on Premises 

The DILLIARO Corp. 
rLaze 7-4400 


bers like “Paper Cup” (that had the 
team moving in a small circle demon- 
strating the viewpoint of the song’s 
speaker) and “California My Way” 
from their first LP. 

Although sheer musical talent for 
styling and sound might have been 
enough to sweep the groiup into unan- 
imous approval from the audience 
with their new “Carpet Man” and “Up, 
Up and Away” the team seldom set- 
tled for only vocals in its outstand- 
ing performance. For them and from 
them it was not a concert but a 
performance and one that ranks with 
the best around today. 

Members of Sergio Mendes’ team 
had less opportunity for visual enter- 
tainment, hindered by the immobility 
of their instruments, but they were 
nonetheless impressive throughout 
and did manage to move about while 
introducing a “carnival” atmosphere 
for a medley from “Black Orpheus.” 
What was missing (in comparison) in 
motion and flair was more than made 
up for in merriment, spirit and the 
most zestful interpretations of Brazil- 
ian music around. 

'Starting with soft sounds, the sex- 
tet stepped up the pace with “Opatu” 
and continued in high gear through 
“Coin’ Out of My Head” and a col- 
lection of offerings from the film 
score of “Black Orpheus.” Staging the 
Orphean set, Mendes and his collabo- 
rates covered the audience with a 
blanket of sounds from Rio Mardi 
Gras festivities. Whistles, bells, 
drums and tambourine rattles decked 
out the scurrying figures dancing 
across the stage while Mendes de- 
scribed the scene and introduced the 
medley. Spotlighted with whistle and 
a drum (played by stretching the 
skin rather than beating it) the 
group’s drummer Joao Palma stole the 
stage as did Herbie Mann who entered 
the scene for the next number. Wel- 
comed by a thundering reception, 
Mann joined the crew for a pheno- 
menal interpretation of “Day Trip- 
per,” after which the applause 
doubled. 

Touches of American jazz and a 
vitality often filtered out of American 
bossa programs returned as the audi- 
ence attention was drawn again to 
Mendes who was showcased in a 
combined showing of “One Note 
Samba” and “'Spanish Flea,” “The 
Look of Love” and his closing “Reza.” 

Just as the program had begun, 
with a surprise, it had seemingly 
drawn to a close without the perform- 
ance of “Mas Que Nada.” But the 
encore showing made the brief wait 
worthwhile, it was delivered (as the 
bank would say) with interest. One 
of the cleanest, sharpest and most in- 
ventive playings of the familiar num- 
ber that the group had ever done. 


SIMON & GARFUNKEL 


NEW YORK — Columbia’s crack folky 
duo Simon & Garfunkel packed Car- 
negie Hall for two shows last week- 
end. At the midnight concert, they 
opened with “Scarborough Fair Can- 
ticle” from the “Parsley, Sage, Rose- 
mary, And Thyme” LP. That was 
followed in relatively quick succes- 
sion by “Homeward Bound,” “At The 
Zoo,” “Fakin’ It,” and a new love 
ballad, before they went into the oft- 
cut “59th St. Bridge Song.” Follow- 
ing “I Am A Rock” and “Cloudy,” 
they closed off the first half of the 
show with a song from the “The 
Graduate” flick, for which Paul Simon 
did the score. 

One highlight of the first segment 
was the debut of a new social satire 
ditty that concerns a cross-country 
bus trip and the various progressive 
stages of resultant paranoia devel- 
oped on the journey. 

“Sound of Silence,” “Hazy Shade of 


Winter,” and “Dangling Conversa- 
tion” were highlights of the second 
half, as was Art Garfunkel’s inform- 
ing the audience . . . “Contrary to 
popular belief, I can talk.” 

Eddie Simon (Paul’s brother) 
came on stage during the first of four 
encores for a guitar duet with his 
brother. Other encores included the 
caustic “Richard Corey,” a Paul 
Simon solo, and “He Was My 
Brother,” a tribute to the slain civil 
rights worker, Andy Goodman. 

Simon & Garfunkel, on stage alone 
for the most part, went through theii; 
repertoire in the easy, relaxed, almost 
casual manner that has become their 
hallmark. Perhaps the most importan 
of all, they delivered the goods; first 
by not sharing the bill with anyone; 
and second by giving the audience 
exactly what it was there for . 
plenty of good Simon & Garfunkel 


JOHN STEWART — BUFFY FORD 


HOLLYWOOD — It’s just about ten 
years since Tom Dooley encountered 
a white oak tree. But he hung around 
just long enough to help revolutionize 
the pop-folk market and create a 
dynasty of sorts for Nick Reynolds, 
Bob Shane and John Stewart — the 
Kingston Trio. That “eternal triangle” 
mentioned in the intro to “Dooley” 
might have been a fitting epitaph for 
the trio. Except, as they announced 
at a press conference held just a year 
ago this week, its continuance would 
only serve to stifle individual freedom. 
Each has gone his own way since, 
victims of musical type casting. Audi- 
ences, it seemed, wanted to hear the 
same old songs sung in the same old 
way. 

‘ Reynolds, we are told, is racing 
cars in and around San Francisco. 
Shane has formed — or is in the proc- 
ess of forming — an act with Travis 
Edmunson, formerly of Bud and 
Travis. And Stewart has teamed with 
a fetching long haired blonde named 
Buffy Ford, debuting last week at 
the Glendale Ice House. 

The act is composed entirely of 
Stewart’s own material, set to his 
six and twelve stringed acoustical 
guitars and the bass backdrop of Jay 
Keller. The songs are primarily con- 
cerned with those disenchanted 
dreams which all “losers” share, sad 


savored observations. Poignant vig 
nettes — some torn from headlines 
with the impact of John Dos Passes’ 
“UjS.A.” — “ a guy in Texas went ou* 
of his head — six or eight people are' 
dead.” “iDaydream Believer” is only 
part I of the triology of Charlie 
Fletcher whose dreams of glory witK 
his “homecoming queen” are never 
nearly fulfilled. “Sarah and Leroy’ 
are tone poems dedicated to th' 
Martyrs of our world — lost lonel 
graceless souls. The imagery inven 
tive. A baroque mirror rhythmical! 
reflected, set to music, and held s^ 
each of us may see ourselves. ^ 

Buffy Ford, who joins Stewart foi 
the last half of the set, visually re-^ 
minds us of the Eva Marie Saint in 
“On the Waterfront.” Her voice is 
pure and sure, a perfect blending" 
catalyst to Stewart’s caustic baritonej 
In the rich tradition of Montandj_ 
Aznavour, Becaud and Brel, Stewart’s 
tunes of tenderness and tragedy are 
neutralized somewhat by his playfu!' 
patter between. It only serves to 
diminish the chilling effect of his 
poetry. 

Duo is switching to the Pasadena 
Ice House this week and will 
appearing there through Feb. llthJ 
You are advised, urged and ordered 
to attend. 



AFTER PACTING — Clive Davis, 
president of CBS Records, is shown 
with Laura Nyro, the young singer 
composer who recently signed an ex- 
clusive recording contract with Co- 
lumbia. The lark’s debut Columbia 
LP is scheduled for release in the 
near future. She is produced by 
Charles Calello, producer of pop A&R 
at Columbia. 

She had gained a reputation be- 
cause of album product released by 
Verve-Folkways. 


c 


Laurie Goes R&B Via 
Drew Dist-rib Deal 

NEW YORK — Laurie Records is en 
tering the R&B field via a worldwide’ 
distribution pact with Detroit-based 
Drew Records, headed up by Ray 
Jackson. The announcement was 
made by Doug Morris, general man-i 
ager of Laurie. Drew has reeentlja' 
scored success with the Precisions,* 
whose last single, “If This Is Love 
I’d Rather Be Lonely,” reportedly 
topped 200,000 in sales and went Top ■ 
60 on the pop charts and Top 20 on ■ 
the R&B charts. 

The Drew line will continue to be 
distributed by the regular Drew Dis- 
tribution set-up except for a few 
changes with Laurie acting as the 
national distributor. Promotion re- 
mains with Bill Craig and Bob Silazy 
of Drew. The first release under the 
new set-up is “Instant Heartbreak,” 
by the Precisions. 


Kerr Produces New Diamond. 

Joe Kolsky, president of Diamond 
Records, has just disclosed an agree- 
ment with George Kerr of Ba^vess 
Productions to produce Ruby Winters 
and Johnny Thunder (both Diamond 
Records artists) for his label. 

“George Kerr is definitely one of 
the ‘hottest producers’ around today,” 
says Joe Kolsky, currently riding 
high with his productions for Linda 
Jones, the O’Jays and Troy Keyes. 

Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


46 





BLUE NOTE 


A PRODUCT OF 
LIBERTY RECORDS 


ON BLUE 



BST-84244 




NOTE RECORDS 


iL ■■■Stanley 

iTurrentine 


Jack Wilson 
Lee Morgan 
Garnett, Brown 
Jackie McLean 
BobCranshnw 
Billy Higgins 

easterly 

winds 


BST-84268 


BST-84270 


asEi Box — February 10, 1968 


47 “ 




Economics Author To 
Talk On Merger To HARM 

PHILADELPHIA — Stanley Foster 
Reed, editor of “Mergers & Acquisi- 
tion,” will be featured speaker at the 
opening business session of the up- 
coming 10th Anniversary Convention 
of the Nat’l Association of Record 
Merchandisers (NARM). 

Scheduled for March 18, the open- 
ing session is expected to draw the 
largest gathering of record and tape 
industry executives together at the 
Diplomat Hotel in Hollywood, Fla. 

Reed’s magazine has found wide ac- 
ceptance in business, financial, legal 
and accounting circles since its in- 
ception four years ago. He is a busi- 
nessman, lecturer, and editor at pres- 
ent but had been a professional band 
musician; he plays five instruments. 

Subject of Reed’s address will be 
“The Myth On Mergers— Taking the 
Mystery Out of Mergers,” which ac- 
cording to NARM convention chair- 
man Amos Heilicher is one of the most 
timely topics of conversation today. 

Preceding Reed, the Keynote Ad- 
dress will be delivered by Norm Racu- 
sin, vice president and general man- 
ager of the RCA Victor record divi- 


Elektra's Compatible Singles 

NEW YORK — Almost all of Elektra 
Records’ singles will be released in 
compatible stereo, beginning with the 
new Love single, “Alone Again Or,” it 
was announced last week by Jac Holz- 
man, president of Elektra. Singles 
will be released in the compatible 
stereo format. Holzman said that this 
move was in keeping with the change- 
over in the U.S. to an all-stereo record 
industry. He maintains that the con- 
tinued release of mono singles was in- 
consistent with the superior sound of 
today’s stereo LP’s and might be one 
reason for the rapid drop in singles 
sales in the past year. 

To reassure radio stations which 
bi’oadcast in mono, Holzman said that 
Elektra’s stereo releases will be cut 
with vertical limiting, so that stations 
with modern mono pick up equipment 
will be able to reproduce them without 
difficulty. Elektra will continue to pro- 
duce limited quantities of mono 
singles. 


sion. A President’s Panel will follow, 
featuring ten record manufacturing 
company heads. 

Convention dates are March 17-22. 



A SMASH SINGLE . . . 

MINI SKIRT" 

(JAY JAY 344) 

JicC 

(THE WORLD’S POLKA KING) 



It Couldn't Hoppnn To A Nicer Gur 

K MIiii Skirt Minme | 

WMriowoy Poikd . 
When Music Start* To Woy 
Hug ond Kis* Ppiko 
Pr UuMranco Woik Poiko -/ i 
IWonnoGM 
IVo Got A Heartoch* ’ 






JAY JAY Mf-fUm 


WRITE, WIRE OR PHONE; JAY JAY RECORD (0. 

CHICAGO ... 79 W. MONROE ST. SUITE 712 - PHONE 782-9035 

HOLLYWOOD . . . 1680 N. VINE ST. c/o MR. TRACE 

MIAMI BEACH . . . P.O. BOX 4155 NORMANDY BRANCH, 33141 


SALUTE TO LAWRENCE WELK” 


(JAY JAY STEREO 5117) 
MONO QTY STEREO QTY 

‘‘MINI SKIRT” 

(JAY JAY 344) SINGLE 

QTY 


NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY STATE. 

ZIP CODE 


SEND ORDER TO YOUR RECORD SUPPLIER OR JAY JAY RECORD CO. 


. FEATHER 
RECORDS"'' 



WAKE UP TO MY VOICE 

1968-B-RE 1 

THE LYRICS 


peacock/ralke 

PRODUCTION 


MEtthandising, 2580 W. Piso, L.A., Calif. 90006/ Petenchio Artists, 9000 Sunset Blvd., L.A. Calif. 90069 


48 



THEY CAME FOR THREE GOLDIES — The Association (Warner Bros. -7 
Arts) displays the three gold records received for the “Along Came The Asso- 
ciation” LP, the “Insight Out” LP, and the “Never My Love” single. Presenta- 
tion was made at a press-cocktail party held at the Beverly Hills Hotel. Shown 
(from the left) are: Ted Bluechel; Russ Giguere; Joe Smith, vice president 
and general manager of WB-7 Arts Records; Brian Cole; Terry fcrkman; 
Larry Ramos; and Jim Yester. 



20th Fox Music Staff 
At Company's Highest 

NEW YORK — Current projects on 
film and television scores at 20th Cen- 
tury Fox have sixteen noted composers 
presently at work there, the largest 
number ever assembled simultaneously 
at the firm. 

Under general music director Lionel 
Newman, works in progress are being 
developed by several of the company’s 
regular composers as well as new 
figures at the 20th Fox scene. Bronis- 
law Kaper is now scoring “A Flea In 
Her Ear,” Johnny Mandel is engaged 
with “She Let Him Continue,” Lennie 
Hayton on “Star!,” Jerry (Goldsmith 
on “Bandolero!,” Billy May on “A 
Guide for the Married Woman” and 
Rod McKuen with “Joanna.” 

Television pilots being readied by 
the studio include “Julia,” being scored 
by Elmer Bernstein, “European Eye,” 
by Quincy Jones, “Lancer,” by Jerome 
Moross, and Robert Drasnin on “Joa- 
quin Murietta,” being co-produced by 
Rosenberg and Ricardo Montalban. 

For 20th Century-Fox network tele- 
vision shows currently airing, Joseph 
Mullendore and Leith Stevens are on 
segments of “Lost in Space,” Harry 


Ampex Piano Roll Tapes 

NEW YORK — Ampex Stereo Tapes 
just released twelve open reel tapes i 
containing performances preserved I 
on piano rolls from Welte Legacy; 
of Piano Treasures. The actual play -- 1 
ing of the music was done two genera- 
tions ago by a group of 19th-20th cen- 
tury artists. The piano rolls, recently 
found, recorded not only the notes the i 
artists played, but the touch, tone and I 
expression of their playing too. The 
sound from the rolls is re-created by a i 
device known as a “Welte Vorsetzer”. .' 
The “Welte Vorsetzer”, with its felt- I 
covered fingers and feet, plays, on the i 
piano in front of it, with the dynamics ^ | 
of the original pianist. i 

The new Ampex tapes contain per- 
formances by the following artists: > 
Claude Debussy, Maurice Ravel, Rich- 
ard Strauss, Manuel De Falla, Ignace 
Jan Paderewski, Camille Saint-Saens, 
Josef Hoffmann, Olga Samaroff, Vladi- 
mir De Pachmann, Ferruccio Busoni, 
Enrique Granados, Teresa Carreno, . 
Rudolph Ganz and Eugen d’Albert. i 

Geller and Alexander Courage on j 
“Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea,” i 
Arthur Morton on “Peyton Place” and j 
Irving Gertz on “Daniel Boone.” j 


PLENTY OF BREAD — Cary Grant (center) introduces Tony Bennett (left) to 
Sen. Robert Kennedy at a recent Democratic Party $1 thousand per plate 
dinner at the Plaza in New York. Sandy Grant is second from left and Ethel , 
Kennedy is barely visible at the far right. Grant recently joined Bennett on 
the Columbia label with his (Grant’s) Chi’istmas single, “Here’s To You” 
“Christmas Lullaby.” That was Grant’s first entry into the disk field. Bennett 
headlined the entertainment at the affair, which had Democratic representatives 
from all 50 states in attendance. 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 











Pop Picks 



LADY SOUL — Aretha Franklin — Atlantic 8167/ 
SD 8167 

Few people will dispute that, in terms of her 
current popularity, Aretha Franklin deserves to 
be called “Lady Soul.” Her voice is somewhere 
between funky and sweet, wide in range and, most 
important, possessed of that indescribable “quali- 
ty ‘X’ ” that makes the difference between the hit- 
maker and the would-be hitmaker. This album, 
highlighted by her recent #1 single, the contagious 
blueser, “Chain Of Fools,” showcases Aretha at 
her best. 


HORIZONTAL— Bee Gees— Atco 33233/SD33233 
Three of the Bee Gees, Barry, Robin and Mau- 
rice Gibb, wrote all of the inventive songs on this, 
the group’s second Atco album (as they did on the 
first), and they have come up with enough win- 
ners to send the set high on the charts. Leading 
off with their English smash, the potent rock 
ballad, “World,” the group goes on to offer eleven 
others including their recent hit, “Massachusetts,” 
and the imaginative title number. 



LIVE FOR LIFE (VIVRE POUR VIVRE) AND 
OTHER GREAT THEMES — Ferrante & Teicher — 
United Artists UAL 3632/UAS 6632 

Piano duo Ferrante and Teicher impart a viva- 
city and lovely lucidity to a set of movie and 
Broadway musical themes. Mellifluous interpreta- 
tions of the title tune, “If Ever I Would Leave 
You,” “Talk To The Animals,” and “To Sir, With 
Love” are served up in fine style by the artists. A 
most enjoyable album. 



TENDERNESS JUNCTION— Fugs— Reprise R/ 
RS 6280 

Long a spearhead of the underground rock 
movement, the Fugs hold true to form (or their 
lack of it) with this fiercely satirical and often 
highly amusing excursion that includes such rep- 
resentative titles as “Turn On/Tune In/Drop Out,” 
“Wet Dream,” “Hare Krishna,” and “Exorcising 
The Evil iSpirits From The Pentagon October 21, 
1967.” Outside talent imported for this production 
includes Allen Ginsberg and Gregory Corso. 
Though not much of a candidate for AM airplay, 
the Fugs’ Reprise debut is likely to be a smash. 



WE CAN FLY— Cowsills— MGM E/SE 4534 
Titled after their current single hit, the sun- 
shine-filled rocker, “We Can Fly,” the Coovsill’s 
latest album is a sure bet to become a hit in its 
own right. Bill and Bob Cowsill did production 
chores for the set, and they have come up with 
eleven groovy numbers, most of which they had 
large part in writing. Put this one high on your 
“must” list. 



GOIN’ TO MEMPHIS — Paul Revere & Raiders 
Featuring Mark Lindsay-Columbia CL 2805/CS 
9605 

Columbia’s crack, rock group, Paul Revere and 
the Raiders, have brought their talents to bear on 
a selection of ditties with the “Memphis Sound,” 
and the result is a sAvinging LP that should find its 
way quickly to the charts. All the funky infec- 
tiousness of the “Memphis Sound” has been cap- 
tured by the group, particularly by Mark Lindsay, 
who wrote and sings many of the numbers on the 
package. Rousing effort. Watch it move. 


MORE THAN A MIRACLE— Roger Williams— 
Kapp KL 1550/KS 3550 

Roger (“Autumn Leaves”) Williams plays his 
“More Than A Miracle,” from the film of the same 
name, plus such outstanding ventures as “The Im- 
possible Dream,” “Alfie,” “Ode To Billie Joe,” 
“To Sir With Love,” and “Mas Que Nada.” Wil- 
liam’s sparkling piano style highlights the excel- 
lent material chosen for this album. Looks like 
plenty of good music play for this one. The music 
from the film scores and the artist’s name should 
be strong marketing points. 



LOVE, LOST & FOUND — Jay & Techniques — 
Smash MGS 27102/SRS 67102 

Featuring their rapidly climbing, charted single, 
“iStrawberry Shortcake,” Jay & the Techniques 
album is a powerhouse, filled with the group’s 
brassy, funky R&B/rock sound. “Dig A Little 
Deeper” and the soft, melodic “I’m Gonna Make 
You Love Me” are also standouts. Judging from 
the group’s singles successes, this LP is likely 
to enjoy a rapid ride to the upper reaches of the 
charts. 



I’M IN LOVE — Wilson Pickett — Atlantic 8175/ 
SD 8175 

Wilson Pickett’s funky, shouting disk perform- 
ances have won him thousands of fans, and “I’m 
In Love” should only increase his reputation. The 
set includes the soul artist’s most recent noise- 
makers, the groovy updating of Lloyd Price’s 
years back hit, “Stagger Lee,” the feelingful “I’m 
In Love” and a host of others. Don’t let this one 
out of your sight. 



SPOOKY — Classics IV — Imperial LP 9371/12371 
Titled after their hit single, the Classic IV’s LP 
is likely to follow that same sales pattern (the 
single is #4 this week) and result in the group’s 
becoming a powerful album act too. Such well 
known tunes as “Daydream Believer,” “The Let- 
ter,” “Goin’ Out Of My Head,” and “By The Time 
I Get To Phoenix” are also included and, com- 
bined with “Spooky,” add up to a striking package. 
This set provides good listening all the way 
through. 



AS REQUESTED— Billy Vaughn— Dot DLP 3841/ 
25841 

Billy Vaughn has received numerous letters ask- 
ing him to cut more material featuring the twin- 
saxophone sound, and he has done so, “As Re- 
quested.” Billy leads orchestra and, on some num- 
bers, chorus through twelve numbers, most of 
them middle-of-the-road oldies such as “Ramona” 
(“Turn The World Around” and “Bonnie And 
Clyde” are exceptions). The twin saxophones keep 
popping up throughout. Should be nice sales on tap 
for this set. 



‘BABY, NOW THAT I’VE FOUND YOU’— Foun- 
dations— UNI 3016/73016 

Sparking the set with their smash single, “Baby, 
Now That I’ve Found You,” the Foundations 
should garner a healthy slice of the sales pie with 
their new LP. Two other fine tracks are “Mr. 
Personality Man” and “I Can Take Or Leave 
Your Loving.” The group’s sound might be de- 
scribed as a sort of British R&B; it’s Avell worth 
listening to. Watch for lots of action on this set. 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


49 







Decca Issues February Album Product 


NEW YORK — Decca Records has just 
issued 12 new LP’s for the month of 
February. 

Leading oif the release is an album 
by Earl Grant titled “Spanish Eyes,” 
a piano-organ package. Pianist Car- 
men Cavallaro is represented with a 
new set titled “Carmen Cavallai*o 
Plays The Hits,” a collection of popu- 
lar melodies. Piano jazz artists, the 
Quartette Tres Bien, add to their 
Decca catalog with a new release 
titled “Four Of A Kind.” 

Decca’s February LP release also 
includes four country albums. Bill 
Anderson and Jan Howard are repre- 
sented by a package titled “For Lov- 
ing You.” The duo’s single, of the 
same name, was a #1 record. Along 
with the title tune, nenned by Steve 
Karliski, Anderson and Howard have 
included songs by Johnny Cash, Har- 
lan Howard, Don Robertson, and, of 
course. Bill Anderson, among others. 
Loretta Lynn is represented in the 
February release with an album of in- 


spirational sacred songs gearing the 
title “Who Says God Is Dead!” Webb 
Pierce follows up his hit single, “Fool, 
Fool, Fool” with an LP titled after, 
and including, this hit. The Wilburn 
Brothers offer an LP called “It’s An- 
other World.” 

Decca’s new February product in- 
cludes a variety of other LP’s, among 
them a new package from Burl Ives 
titled “The Big Country Hits,” a 
compilation of some of this era’s 
most famed country melodies. Trum- 
pet virtuoso Rafael Mendez is 
featured with “Magnificent Mendez,” 
produced in Madrid, Spain. The Cle- 
banoff Strings make their Decca LP 
debut with an instrumental collection 
titled “Once Upon A Summertime.” 
Two new international albums, “The 
Finest Of The Irish,” by Tommy Dren- 
nan And The Monarchs and “Pet Of 
The Pipers,” featuring the Accordion 
of Dermot O’Brien (on Decca’s sub- 
sidiary label. Coral), conclude the list 
of Decca’s new albums. 



Leo The Lion Diskery 
Roars With Two Albums 


NEW YORK — The first recording 
based on the Prince Valiant comic 
strip will be released by MGM’s Leo 
The Lion Records. Permission to re- 
cord was obtained from King Features 
Syndicate who distribute the strip to 
over six hundred newspapers through- 
out the world. Prince Valiant was 
created about thirty years ago by Hal 
Foster and has earned him many 
awards for its outstanding artwork 
and authenticity. 

Featured in the dramatized record- 
ing are such top “voices” as Jackson 
Beck, Peter Fernandez and Bret Mor- 
rison. The record will be a part of 
the continuing Official Adventure 
series which now has Superman, Bat- 
man, Flash Gordon among others. 

Another new release will be Pinoc- 
chio with a dramatized story on one 
side and six songs from the Walt Dis- 
ney film backing it. Wade Denning 
leads the Sultans of Simba and 
chorus which features Bill Elliott and 
Darla Hood. 

Both albums are scheduled for im- 
mediate release. 


rou DON'T KNOW ME 
ELVIS PRESLEY 


.RCA VICTOR 
Brenner Music 


MONTEREY 

ERIC BURDON & ANIMALS MGM 

Slamina Music, Inc. 
Sea-Lark Ent, Inc. 


AIN'T THAT SO 

ERIC BURDON & ANIMALS MGM 

Slamina Music, Inc 
Sea-Lark Ent., Inc. 


WITHOUT LOVE 

OSCAR TONEY, JR BELL 

Progressive Music Pub. Co., Inc. 

Suffolk Music, Inc. 


WHAT'S IT GONNA BE 

DlfSTY SPRINGFIELD PHILIPS 

Rumbalero Music, Inc. 
Ragmar Music, Inc. 


LOVEY OOVEY 

BUNNY SIGLER PARKWAY 

Progressive Music Pub. Co., Inc. 


YOU'RE NEVER GONNA GET MY LOVIN' 

ENCHANTED FOREST AMY 

Pumbaiero Music, Inc. 
Kenny uynch Music, me. 


HERE COMES HEAVEN 

EDDY ARNOLD RCA 

Hill & Range Music, Inc. 


THE IDOL 

THE FORTUNES U.A. 

Noma Music, Inc. 
Fortitude Music. Inc. 


HIS SMILE WAS A LIE 

THE FORTUNES U.A. 

Noma Music, Inc. 
Fortitude Music, Inc. 

WATERLOO SUNSET 
THE KINKS 


REPRISE 

Noma Music, Inc. 
Hi-Count Music, Inc. 


TWO SISTERS 
THE KINKS . 


REPRISE 

Noma Music, Inc. 
Hi-Count Music, Inc. 


THE ABERBACH GROUP 
1619 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 


iiimiciirnixjiii 


WB-7 Arts To Release 
2 Film Score Albums 


BEVEELY HILLS — Warner Bros.- 
Seven Arts Records will release the 
music scores of two Warner Bros.- 
Seven Arts motion pictures in album 
form, according to an announcement 
by label president Mike Maitland. The 
films are “Bonnie And Clyde” and 
“The Fox,” the latter being scheduled 
for release sometime in February. 

Charles Strouse composed the music 
in “Clyde” which was produced by 
Warren Beatty, who also stars with 
Faye Dunaway. Arthur Penn directed 
the picture which has been critically 
acclaimed and reported to be one of the 
year’s all time box office grossers. 

The score in “Fox” was composed 
and conducted by Lalo Schifrin. Pic- 
ture also features one song, “Roll It 
Over,” with both music and lyrics by 
Oscar Brand. Mark Rydell directed 
and Raymond Stross produced film. 


'Dolls' Music Continues 
Strong In 4 New Records 


NEW YORK — Two new singles and 
material in two new albums keeps the 
Andre & Dory Previn music from 
“Valley of the Dolls” going strong. 

In addition to the series of record- 
ings that appeared prior to the open- 
ing of the 20th Century Fox film, the 
new releases include Tony Scotti’s 
Liberty LP featuring “Come Live 
With Me;” Enoch Light’s latest LP 
for Project 3 ; and singles by the Pleas- 
ure Seekers (Capitol) and Rhetta 
Hughes (Columbia). 

Film exposure has also brought 
added attention to the Dionne War- 
wick recording of the title song. 


ATLANTIC-ATCO — 15% discount offered until March 15. 

BELL — 2 free with every 10 purchased. No termination date. 

DIAMOND — One free for every 5 purchased. Expires March 31. 
DUKE-PEACOCK — Buy-7-get -one-free. No expiration date has been set. 
FORTUNE — 1 free when 6 are purchased in any combination. No time-limit. 
GATEWAY — Two free for 10 purchased on entire catalog. NoTime limit. 




JEWEL-PAULA — One free for five purchased on entire catalog. No expirajifon date. 
LITTLE-DARLIN’ — Special 2 on 10 deal on all product. No expiration date. 


MONMOUTH-EVERGREEN — 1 free with 10 purchased on entire catalog. No ex- 
piration date. 


ORIGINAL SOUND — 15% discount on all LP’s — until further notice. 


PHILIPS — Discounts on entire catalog. SPM/SPS series are discounted 10%, all 
other classicals discounted 20%. No expiration date. 


PRESTIGE — 15% discount on all LP product until further notice. 
ROULETTE — 15% discount in free merchandise. Expiration date indefinite. 


SCEPTER-WAND — 2 free with every 10 purchased. No termination date. 
SIMS — 3 free with every 10 purchased on entire catalog. No expiration date. 


SMASH-FONTANA — Special discounts available through distribs. No expiration date] 


TAMLA-MOTOWN-GORDY — Buy-7-get-one-free. No expiration date set. 
TOWER — 10% discount on all albums. No expiration date. 


Atlantic Mounts Campaign 
For 'History Of R&B' LP's 


NEW YORK — Atlantic Records last 
week initiated a massive campaign for 
the recently released “History of 
Rhythm & Blues” series of LP’s. Pro- 
gram encompasses major advertising 
in consumer, college and underground 
newspapers, radio commercials, and 
mailings to dealers, rack jobbers, one- 
stops, book stores and libraries. 

(Campaign was stepped up because 
of the enthusiastic initial response by 
deejays, consumers and distributors. 
The four-volume set presents a 
thoroughly researched and documented 
history of the r&b development from 
1947 through 1960. Among the figures 
presented on the LP’s are the Orioles, 
Clyde MePhatter, the Clovers, Ruth 
Brown, Joe Turner, Lavern Baker, 
Ray Charles, the Drifters and others. 

Albums in the set are available in- 
dividually, and a special pre-rack has 
been made for dealers to show the 
four sets and includes a browser box 
that can be mounted on store counters 
on its own special stand. 



RMJtJt Cold Record 
awards 


jaivuJUtY 


A Monthly Survey Of RIAA-Gold Record Awards 
Singles: Sales Of 7 Million Or More Albums: $ 1 Million At Factory Prices 


Albums: Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits (Columbia) 

Love Me With All Your Heart- Jim Nabors 
(Columbia) 

Strange Days-Doors (Elektra) 

Singles: Chain of Fools-Aretha Franklin (Atlantic) 
Skinny Legs & All -Joe Tex (Dial) 


Judy In Disguise-John Fred & Playboy Band 
(Paula) 


Bend Me, Shape Me-American Breed-(Acta) 


PoiHer Set Re-Released 

BEVERLY HILLS— In order to capi- J 
talize on Sidney Poitier’s current peak"kr 
box office success and international i 
popularity, Warner Bros.-Seven Arts ^ 
Records plans to re-release an album j 
first recorded by the actor over three! 
years ago. According to the diskery,J 
Poitier’s LP will be backed by a major! 
promotion campaign in addition to 
having a new title, cover, and pack 
aging. 

The album, waxed by the actor on 
a one-shot basis, is comprised ofi 
numerous recitations and was original 
ly titled, “Poitier Meets Plato” and 
features a background jazz score by 
Fred Katz. The new LP release will 
be tagged, “Sidney Poitier Journeys 
Inside the Mind” with a sub-title “The 
Dialogues Of Plato — The Music Of 
Fred Katz. 

Feeling at WB-7 Arts is that sine 
the original release in 1964, there 
is now a greater acceptance of this 
type of product by radio stations, an 
attitude completely the reverse of that 
which was accorded the poetic jazz 
LP. Also Poitier’s skyrocketing sue-’ 
cess was one of the major reasons' 
label decided upon the re-issue. Ac-] 
cording to Ed 'Thrasher, art directon 
of the company, this new album cover 
will be updated to reflect the new vis- :| 
ual approach present in today’s album ! 
making. I 




Beacon Street Union Tours 


f 


NEW YORK — MGM’s leading expon-' i ^ 
ents of the newly created “Bosstowr^tJ 
Sound” the Beacon Street Union have i 
embarked on a nationwide tour to . 
bring them into four large market- j j 
places. 

Opening with shows at the Grande 
Ballroom in Detroit last weekend, the 
team will move to Los Angeles’ Chee- 
tah (16-18), the Cheetah in Chicago 
(23-24) and New York’s Scene next 
month. 

Accompanying the Beacon Street 
Union is a pre-showtime promotion 
highlighted by saturation of locations 
with large posters and plugs for the 
recently released debut LP, “The Eyes' 
of the Beacon Street Union.” Album is|^ 
packaged in a double-fold, warpr 
around jacket. 

Lenny Sheer, MGM’s sales director, 
has stated that a TV film is now avail- 
able in which the group performs selec- 
tions from the album. 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


3 


50 




shBoK JUbum ReviBws 




Pop Picks 


RAVI — Ravi Shankar — Capitol T/ST 10504 
iSitar master Ravi Shankar’s new album is 
given over to two ragas, one on each side of the 
set and both a little more than twenty minutes 
long. “Raga: Abhogi-Kanada,” on Side One, is 
slow and meditative for about ten minutes, then 
shifts to mid-tempo and finally to fast. Kanai 
Dutt, on tabla, joins Shankar for the last quarter 
of this raga. “Raga: Tilak-JShyam,” on Side Two, 
has a variety of tempos and moods. “Ravi” should 
see chart action. 



THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS— Count Basie & 
Mills Brothers — Dot DLP 3838/25838 
The Mills Brothers, who just hit the Top 100 
with “Cab Driver,” join forces with Count Basie’s 
big band, and the results are a wondrous blend- 
ing of longtime talents. Swinging Basie backings 
lend body to the Mills Brothers renditions of “Up 
A Lazy River,” “I Want To Be Happy,” “I Dig 
Rock And Roll Music,” and the famous Basie “one 
more time” version of “April In Paris.” The set 
should reap a sales bonanza. 


IT’S A GREAT LIFE— Trini Lopez— Reprise R/ 
RS 6285 

Reprise’s crack chanter, Trini Lopez, here offers 
a dozen pop ditties that should win the enthusiasm 
of his flock of fans. iStarting off with the buoyant, 
hope-filled chins-upper, “It’s A Great Life,” the 
ace songster goes on to offer a variety of ballads 
and toe-tappers that maintain listener interest 
throughout. Rousing production. 



THE SUNSHINE COMPANY— Imperial LP 
9368/12368 

Currently climbing the Top 100 with their new 
single, a tuneful, blues-tinged love rocker called 
“Look, Here Comes The iSun,” the Sunshine Com- 
pany stands a good chance of making lots of 
chart noise with their new LP as well. The group 
(four guys and one girl) sometimes sounds like 
the Seekers, but there is a heavier rock element 
in most of their material. Keep close tabs on this 
set. It could go far. 



THE SKY — San Sebastian Strings , . . (music) 
Anita Kerr . . . (words) Rod McKuen . . . (narra- 
tion) Gene Merlino — Warner Bros.-? Arts W/WS 
1720 

Billed as having “. . . a woman’s feelings about 
how music should be written and a man’s ideas 
about life,” this set completes the trilogy begun 
with “The Sea” and “The Earth.” McKuen’s 
imagery is remarkably easy to identify with and 
that, combined with Anita Kerr’s music and the 
same high standards of excellence used in the first 
two LP’s, make for very pleasant listening. “The 
Sea” and “The Earth” were both charted. 



BOUND TO HAPPEN — Cashman, Pistilli & West 
—ABC/ABCS 629 

This trio, a behind the scenes disk factor as back- 
ground voices, producers and writers (e.g. “Sun- 
day Will Never Be The Same”) open shop on 
their own. Their rock blend is first-rate, with a 
dulcet manner that is convincing and exciting. 
Tunes, including “Sunday,” are mostly their own. 
Their opening-closing number, “Bound to Hap- 
pen,” sounds prophetic. 


Pop Best Bets 


BRENTDN WOOD m 

3A8YYOU GOTiT 


BABY YOU GOT IT— Brenton Wood— Double 
Shot DSM 1003/DST 5003 

Bearing the title of his recent chart single, 
Brenton Wood’s new LP venture is a potent item 
with all the earmarks of a winner. The chanter’s 
voice is particularly effective in the higher regis- 
ters and in falsetto singing. His material is soul. 
In addition to the title tune, Brenton offers his 
recent biggie, “Gimmie Little Sign,” and a host 
of other striking numbers. Should go far. 



BOOGIE WITH CANNED HEAT— Liberty LRP 
3541/LST 7541 

Funky, hard-driving rock permeates this offer- 
ing by Canned Heat. “My Crime” is an insistent, 
throbbing effort; “Whiskey Headed Woman No. 
2” is a lowdown, doleful tune which shows off 
Canned Heat at its bluesy best. A long (11:04) 
wailing version of “Fried Hockey Boogie” closes 
Side 2, and each member of Canned Heat solos on 
the number. The set should find ready acceptance 
with blues-oriented buyers. 



HALF A SIXPENCE— Original Motion Picture 
Soundtrack — RCA Victor LOC/LSO 1146 

The color and merriment of the popular musi- 
cal, “Half A Sixpence,” are well captured in this 
soundtrack LP from the Paramount flick. Tommy 
Steele recreates the role which launched his 
career (first in England and then on Broadway), 
that of Arthur Kipps, the orphan lad who travels 
the wheel of fortune all the way around. The rest 
of the cast is excellent, and so are the songs. 
Chart action is likely for this set. 



JONATHAN WINTERS . . . WINGS IT!— Colum- 
bia CL 2811/CS 9611 

Recorded live at Randy Sparks’ Ledbetters 
Club in west Los Angeles, this is Jonathan Win- 
ters’ first Columbia Records LP. Winters is as 
wild as ever as he treats such topics as “Neck- 
ing In A ’38 Ford,” the decimation of hunters in 
the hunting season in “The Deer Hunters,” and 
a series of improvisations based on the audience’s 
suggestions. The comedian’s improvisational abil- 
ity is shown by the fact that 80% of the material 
on the disk was “winged.” A wonderfullv whacky 
LP. 



THE ROSE GARDEN— Atco 33225/SD 33225 
The Rose Garden hastens to capitalize on its 
recent chart single, “Next Plane To London,” 
with this LP. Easygoing rock is the keynote of the 
set, as in such tunes as the title track, “February 
Sunshine,” “She Belongs To Me,” and “Look What 
You’ve Done.” The group also offers a feelingful 
rendition of Bob Dylan’s “She Belongs To Me.” 
The Rose Garden should grow a healthy sales crop 
with this album. 



BACHELORS ’68— London LL 3528/PS 528 
The Bachelors harmonize smoothly on an al- 
bum of pop melodies. The group gives a winning, 
lyrical reading of “Chapel In The Moonlight,’’ 
and a dramatic, stirring treatment of “Walk With 
Faith In Your Heart.” A swaying, gentle offering 
of “Learn To Live Without You” is also featured 
on the set. The Bachelors should rack up impres- 
sive sales with this quality package. 


ICash Box — February 10, 1968 


51 


I 








f 



^ome albums 
^ carry mm 

weight than others 


■ »Niiaiiii I iM 


LOVE RHAPSODIES 
V36013 • V6013 


0VE 


Urn* 








1967 s ^1 New Instrumental Artist 

zM^idnight Spring ^artet 


VIVA RECORDS. INC. I 


DISTRIBUTED NATIONAllY BY DOT RECORDS. INC. 


Cash 


Box — February 10, 19J 


52 


1 

2 


3 

4 



6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 



15 

16 

17 

18 
19 



21 

22 

23 

24 

101 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

107 

108 

lo9 

li 


MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR 

Beaties (Capitol MAL/SMAL 2835) 

THEIR SATANIC 
MAJESTIES REQUEST 

Roling Stones 
(London NP/NPS 2) 

HERB ALPERT'S NINTH 

Herb Alpert & Tijuana Brass 
(A&M 134/SP 4134) 

PISCES, AQUARIUS, 
CAPRICORN & JONES LTD 

Monkees (Colgems COM/COS 104) 

JOHN WESLEY HARDING 

Bob Dylan (Columbia CL 2804/CS 
9604) 

DISRAELI GEARS 

Cream (Atco 232/SD 232) 

DIANA ROSS & THE 
SUPREMES GREATEST 
HITS 

(Motown M/MS 2-663) 

THE TURTLES GOLDEN HITS 

White Whale (WW 115/WWS 7115) 

SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY 
HEART'S CLUB BAND 

Beatles (Capitol T/TS 2653) 

FAREWELL TO THE 
FIRST GOLDEN ERA 

Mamas & Papas 
(Dunhill D/DS 50025) 

DR. ZHIVAGO 

Soundtrack (MGM E/ES 6 ST) 

DIONNE WARWICK'S 
GOLDEN HITS PART ONE 

(Scepter SRM/SRS 565) 

LOVE ANDY 

Andy Williams 
(Columbia CL 2766/CS 9566) 

LETTERMEN . . . AND LIVE 

(Capitol T/ST 2758) 

ARE YOU EXPERIENCED 

Jimi Hendrix Experience 
Reprise R/RS 6261 ) 

STRANGE DAYS 

Doors (Elektra EK 4014/EKS 7414) 

A DAY IN THE LIFE 

Wes Montgomery 
(A&M 2001 /SP 3001) 

THE LAST WALTZ 

Engelbert Humperdinck 
(Parrot PA 61015/PAS 71015) 

AFTER BATHING AT 
BAXTER'S 

JefFerson Airplane 
(RCA Victor LOP/LSO 1511) 

HISTORY OF OTIS 
REDDING 

(Volt M/S 418) 

THE WHO SELL OUT 

(Decca DL 4950/DL 74950) 

WILD HONEY 

Beach Boys 
(Capitol T/ST 2859) 

A GIFT FROM A 
FLOWER TO A GARDEN 

Donovan (Epic L2N 6071 /B2N 171) 

IN A MELLOW MOOD 

Temptations (Gordy G/S 924) 


JOHN MAYAU'S BLUES BRAKERS 
CRUSADE 

(London LL 3529/PS 529) 

STONE PONEYS EVERGREEN VOL. II 

(Capitol T/ST 2763) 

THE BEST OF WES MONTGOMERY 

(Verve V/V6 8714) 

YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE ITALIAN TO 
LIKE PAT COOPER 

(United Artists UAL 3600/UAS 6600) 

TEMPTATIONS GREATEST HITS 
(Gordy GM/GS 919) 

WINDOWS OF THE WORLD 

Dionne Warwick (Scepter SRM/SRS 563) 

THE GLORY OF LOVE 

Herbie Mann (A&M 2003/SP 3003) 

HELLO DOLLY 

New Cast Pearl Bailey & Co. 

(RCA Victor LOC/LSO 1147) 

THE BEST OF SONNY & CHER 

(Atco 219/SD 219) 



• 

BLOOMING HITS 


49 

MISSION IMPOSSIBLE 


1 

Paul Mauriat 
(Philips PHM 200-248/PHS 600-248) 

53 


Lalo Schifrin (Dot DLP 25831) 

49 





50 

THE COWSILLS 



26 

WHEN THE SNOW 



(MGM E/ES 4498) 

43 

2 


IS ON THE ROSES 

Ed Ames 

(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3913) 

22 

51 

$1,000,000 WEEKEND 

Ventures 

(Dolton LRP 2054/LST 8054) 

51 

3 

27 

SOUND OF MUSIC 

24 

52 

ALL MITCH RYDER HITS 




Soundtrack 

(RCA Victor LOCD/LSOD 2005) 


(New Voices NV/NVS 2004) 

48 


28 

CAMELOT 

Soundtrack 

25 

• 

HORIZONTAL 

Bee Gees (Atco 233/SD 233) 

73 

4 


(Warner Bros. B/BS 1712) 


54 

MAN OF LA MANCHA 


10 

29 

ALICE'S RESTAURANT 

Arlo Guthrie 

27 


Original Cast 
(Kapp KRL 4505/KRS 5505) 

52 



(Reprise R/RS 6267) 


• 

NOTORIOUS BYRD BROS 



30 

INCENSE AND 


Byrds (Columbia CL 2757/CS 9575) 

75 

6 


PEPPERMINTS 


56 

GROOVIN' WITH THE 




Strawberry Alarm Clock 
(Uni 3014/73014) 

29 


SOULFUL STRINGS 

(Cadet LP/LPS 796) 

63 

*7 

31 

SIMPLY STREISAND 

Barbra Streisand 

30 

57 

THE MAGIC GARDEN 

62 

/ 


(Columbia CL 2682/CS 9482) 



The 5th Dimension 
(Soul City SCM 91001/SCS 92001) 

5 

32 

VANILLA FUDGE 

(Atco 224/SD 224) 

31 

• 

PORTRAITS 

Buckinghams 

67 


33 

4 TOPS GREATEST HITS 



(Columbia CL 2798/CS 9598) 


8 


(Motown M/MS 662) 

33 

59 

BEE GEES 1ST 


34 

MOVIN' WITH NANCY 



(Atco 223/SD 223) 

54 



Nancy Sinatra (Reprise R/RS 6277) 

38 

60 

CLAMBAKE 

55 

9 

35 

COWBOYS AND COLORED 
PEOPLE 



Elvis Presley 
(RCA Victor LPM/LPS 3893) 




Flip Wilson (Atlantic 8149) 

39 

61 

THE BYRDS GREATEST HITS 


11 





(Columbia CL 2716/CS 9516) 

67 

36 

THE DOORS 







(Elektra EK 4007/EKS 7407) 

34 

62 

WEAR YOUR LOVE LIKE 



37 

IT MUST BE HIM 

35 


HEAVEN 

Donovan (Epic LN 24349/BN 26349) 

69 

13 


Vikki Carr 





(Liberty LRP 3533/LST 7533) 


63 

MASS IN F MINOR 


12 

38 

RELEASE ME 



Electric Prunes (Reprise R/RS 6075) 

64 



Engelbert Humperdinck 
(Parrot PA 61012/PAS 71012) 

37 

64 

THE RESURRECTION OF 
PIGBOY CRABSHAW 


28 

39 

FRESH CREAM 



Butterfield Blues Band 

68 

Cream (Atco 206/SD 206) 

36 


(Elektra EKS 74015) 


17 

40 

HUGH MASAKELA IS ALIVE 

65 

ARETHA ARRIVES 

65 

AND WELL AT THE 
WHISKEY 



Aretha Franklin 
(Atlantic 8150/SD 8150) 




18 


(UNI 3015/73515) 

46 

66 

BY THE TIME 1 GET TO 


41 

WILDFLOWERS 

42 


PHOENIX 

Glen Campbell 

70 

16 


Judy Collins (Elektra EKS 74012) 


(Capitol T/ST 2851) 



42 

EVERYTHING PLAYING 


67 

TO SIR, WITH LOVE 




Lovin' Spoonful 

47 

Soundtrack 

59 

20 


(Kama Sutra KLP/KLPS 8061) 



(Fontana MGF 27569/SRF 67569) 



43 

DOCTOR DOLITTIE 


68 

GONE WITH THE WIND 




Soundtrack 

40 


Soundtrack (MGM IE- 10 St) 

56 



(20th Century-Fox DTCS 5101) 




14 

44 

PLEASE LOVE ME 


• 

AXIS: BOLD AS LOVE 

Jimi Hendrix Experience 




FOREVER 



(Reprise RS 6281) 




Bobby Vinton 
(Epic LN 24341 /BN 26341) 

45 

• 

AGNES ENGLISH 







John Fred & Playboy Band 

92 

26 

45 

GET THAT FEELING 



(Paula LP 2197) 




Jimi Hendrix & Curtis Knight 
(Capitol T/ST 2856) 

50 

71 

TO SIR, WITH LOVE 


21 




Lulu 

57 


46 

UP, UP AND AWAY 



(Epic LN 24339/BN 26339) 


19 


Johnny Mathis 
(Columbia CL 2726/CS 9526) 

32 

• 

VALLEY OF THE DOLLS 

Soundtrack 

87 


47 

1 FEEL LIKE 



(20th Century Fox DTCS 4196) 




I'M FIXIN' TO DIE 


73 

A MAN AND A WOMAN 




Country Joe & The Fish 

41 


Soundtrack 

60 

15 


(Vanguard VRS 9266/VSD 79266) 



(United Artists UAL 4147/UAS 5147) 



48 

BEST OF WILSON PICKETT 


74 

TENDERNESS JUNCTION 


23 


(Atlantic 8151/SD 8151) 

44 


Fugs (Reprise RS 6280) 

79 


llO THE first EDITION 

120 COLLAGE 

(Reprise RS 6276) 

Noel Harrison (Reprise R/RS 6263) 

111 JOHN GARY ON BROADWAY 

121 JOURNEY WITHIN 

(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3928) 

Charles Lloyd (Atlantic 1493/SD 1493) 

112 FAMILY PORTRAIT 

122 ANYTHING GOES 

5 Stairsteps & Cubie 

Harpers Bizarre 

(Buddah BDM 1008/BDS 5008) 

(Warner Bros. W/WS 1716) 

113 GROOVIN' 

123 BUFFALO SPRINGFIELD AGAIN 

Young Rascals (Atlantic 8148/SD 8148) 

(Atco 226/SD 226) 

114 WELCOME TO MY WORLD 

124 SOMETHING SUPER 

Dean Martin (Reprise R.RS 6250) 

King Richard & Fluegel Knights 

115 PATA PATA 

(MTA MTA 1005/MTS 5005) 

Miriam Makeba (Reprise R/RS 6274) 

125 AMBOY DUKES 

116 EYDIE GORME'S GREATEST HITS 

(Mainstream 56104/S 6104) 

(Columbia CL 2764/CS 9564) 

126 TURN THE WORLD AROUND 

117 MISTY ROSES 

Eddy Arnold (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3869) 

Sandpipers (A&M 135/SP 4235) 

127 REVENGE 

118 WITH LOVE CHER 

Bill Cosby (Warner Bros. W/WS 1169) 

(Imperial LP 9358/LPS 12358) 

128 WITHOUT HER 

119 ALBUM 1700 

Jack Jones (RCA Victor LPM/LPS 3911) 

Peter, Paul & Mary 

129 MARY IN THE MORNING 

(Warner Bros. W/WS 1700) 

Al Martino (Capitol T/ST 2780) 


75 THE GOOD THE BAD 
AND THE UGLY 

Orig. Soundtrack 
(United Artists UA 4172/UAL 5172) 


76 INSIGHT OUT 

Association 
(Warner Bros. W/WS 1696) 

77 MONKEES 
HEADQUARTERS 

(Colgems COM/COS 103) 

78 BEST OF HERMAN'S 
HERMITS VOL. Ill 

MGM E/SE 4504) 

79 A SCRATCH IN THE SKY 

Cryan Shames 
(Columbia CL 2786/CS 9586) 


80 THE UNION GAP 

(Columbia CL 2812/CS 9612) 

81 FOREVER CHANGES 

Love (Elektra EKS 74013) 

82 THE BOX TOPS 

(Bell 601 1/S 6011) 

WELCOME TO MY LOVE 

Nancy Wilson (Capitol T/ST 2844) 


84 PINK FLOYD 

(Tower T/TS 5093) 

FRANCIS A & EDWARD K 

Frank Sinatra & Duke Ellington 
(Reprise FS 1024) 

86 REACH OUT 

Burt Bacharach 
(A&M 131/SP 4131) 

BEND ME, SHAPE ME 

American Breed (Acta A8003/38003) 

88 SOMETHING SPECIAL 

Tommy James & Shondells 
(Roulette R/SR 25355) 

89 TOM JONES LIVE 

(Parrot PA 61014/PAS 71014) 

90 THE TIME HAS COME 

chambers Bros. 
(Columbia CL 2722/CS 9522) 

91 FOWL PLAY 

Baia Marimba Band 
(A&M 136/SP 4136) 

92 CAMELOT 

Original Cast 
(Columbia KOL 5620/KOS 2031) 

93 MOTOWN SOUND VOL. 8 

(Motown M/MS 666) 

94 FOR ONCE IN MY LIFE 

Tony Bennett 
Columbia CL 2773/CS 9573) 

95 WHO WILL ANSWER? 

Ed Ames (RCA Victor LMP/LSP 3961) 

96 THE MANTOVANI TOUCH 

(London LL 3526/PS 526) 

97 IT MUST BE HIM 

Ray Conniff 
(Columbia CL 2795/CS 9595) 

98 GREEN TAMBOURINE 

Lemon Pipers 
(Buddah BDM 1009/BDS 5009) 

99 JUNGLE BOOK 

Original Soundtrack (Disney M/S 3948) 

100 A TODAY KIND OF THING 

Four Freshmen 
(Liberty LRP 3542/LST 7542) 


80 

66 

71 

76 

81 

86 

85 

72 
93 
58 


89 


90 

94 

98 

77 

91 

96 

97 


113 

11 


131 


130 HAWAIIAN ALBUM 

Ray Coniff (Columbia CL 2747/SC 9547) 

131 HERE WHERE THERE IS LOVE 

Dionne Warwick (Scepter M/S 555) 

132 LET IT OUT 

Hombres (Verve/Forecast FT/FTS 3036) 

133 THE FLYING NUN 

Sally Fields (Colgeme COM/COS 106) 

134 ENCORE 
Henry Mancini 

(RCA Victor LPM/LPS 3887) 

135 MANTOVANI/HOLLYWOOD 
(London LL3516/PS 516) 

136 RIGHTEOUS BROTHERS GREATEST HITS 
(Verve V/V6 5020) 

137 THE WORLD WE KNEW 

Frank Sinatra (Reprise F/FS 1022) 

138 FIDDLER ON THE ROOF 

Original Cast (RCA Victor LPM/LPS 3730) 

139 GOLDEN GREATS BY THE VENTURES 
(Liberty LRP 2053/LST 8035) 

140 THE GREAT CONSPIRACY 
The Peanut Butter Conspiracy 
(Columbia CL 2790/CS 9590) 


COMPILED BY CASH BOX FROM LEADING RETAIL OUTLETS • Indicates Strong Upward Move 


Basic JUbunt Inventory 

A check list of best selling pop albums other than those appearing on the CASH BOX Top 100 Album chart. Feature is designed to call wholesalers' & retailers' 
attention to key catalog, top steady selling LP's, as well as recent chart hits still going strong in sales. Information is supplied by manufacturers. This is a weekly, 
revolving list presented in alphabetical order. It is advised that this card be kept until the list returns to this alphabetical section. 


LONDON 


Rolling Stones 

December’s Children 

L-3451 

PS451 

Rolling Stones 

Rolling Stones Now 

L-3420 

PS420 

Mantovani 

Mantovani Magic 

L-3448 

PS448 

Bachelors 

Hits Of The 60’s 

L-3460 

PS460 

Rolling Stones 

12 X 5 

L-3402 

PS402 

Mantovani 

Incomparable Mantovani 

L-3392 

PS392 

Mantovani 

Mantovani Sound 

L-3419 

PS419 

Rolling Stones 

The Rolling Stones 

L-3375 

PS375 

Marianne Faithful 

Marianne Faithful 

L-3423 

PS423 

Roland Shaw 

Themes From James Bond Thrillers 

L-3412 

PS412 

Mantovani 

Moon River & Other Themes 

L-3261 

PS249 

Mantovani 

Exodus & Great Film Themes 

L-3231 

PS224 

Frank Chacksfield 

Country & Western Hits 

L-3436 

PS436 

Frank Chacksfield 

Ebb Tide 

L-3322 

PS322 

C. Valente 

Valente’s Greatest Hits 

L-3441 

PS441 

Will Glahe 

The Big Polka Band Hits 

L-3344 

PS344 

Bachelors 

Marie 

L-3435 

PS435 

Mantovani 

Film Encores 

L-3117 

PS164 

Anton Karas 

Third Man Theme 

L-1560 


Stanley Black 

Broadway Spectacular 


SP44071 

David Whitfield 

Cara Mia 

L-1417 


Vera Lynn 

Vera Lynn’s Golden Hits 

L-3294 


Mantovani 

Latin Rendezvous 

L-3295 

PS295 

Newley-Original Cast 

Stops The World 

AM58001 

AMS88001 

Mantovani 

Film Encores 

L-1700 

PS124 

Bachelors 

No Arms Can Ever Hold You 

L-3418 

PS418 

Stanley Black 

Music Of A People 

L-3409 

SP44060 

Ronnie Aldrich 

That Aldrich Feeling 


SP44070 

Will Glahe 

The Polka King 

L-3046 


Mantovani 

Strauss Waltzes 

L-685 

PS118 

Loussier Trio 

Play Bach, Vol. 1 

L-3287 

PS287 

Edmundo Ros 

Rhythms Of The South 

L-1612 

PS 134 

Frank Chacksfield 

The New Ebb Tide 


SP44053 

Original Cast 

Wait-A-Minim 

AM58002 

AMS88002 

Grenadier Guards 

Marches Of Sousa 

L-1229 

PS139 

Stanley Black 

Cuban Moonlight 

L-1166 

PS137 

Bachelors 

Presenting The Bachelors 

L-3353 

PS353 

Stanley Black 

Spain 

L-3313 

SP44016 

Stanley Black 

Film Spectacular 

L-3291 

SP44025 

Ted Heath 

Chartbusters 


SP44074 

Stanley Black 

Russia 


SP44075 

Edmundo Ross 

Latin Boss 


SP44073 

Stanley Black 

Film Spectacular Vol. Ill 


SP44078 

Mantovani 

Mr. Music 

L-34/4 

PS474 

Rolling Stones 

Big Hits 

NP-1 

NPS-1 

Rolling Stones 

Aftermath 

L-3476 

PS476 

Eric Rogers 

Vaudeville 


SP44083 

Frank Chacksfield 

Hawaii 


SP44087 

Stanley Black 

Broadway Blockbuster 


SP44088 

Margaret Whiting 

Maggie Isn’t Margaret Anymore 

LL-3510 

PS510 

Jeannie Carson 

Jeannie Carson 

LL-3504 

PS504 

Margaret Whiting 

The Wheel Of Hurt 

LL-3497 

PS497 

Marianne Faithful 

Faithful Forever 

LL-3482 

PS482 

Mantovani 

Mantovani’s Golden Hits 

LL-3483 

PS483 

Bachelors 

Bachelors’ Girls 

LL-3491 

PS491 

Marianne Faithful 

Go Away From My World 

LONDON GROUP 

LL-3452 

PS452 

The Zombies 

The Zombies 

PA61001 

PAS71001 

Them 

Them Again 

PA61008 

PAS71008 

Them 

Them 

PS61005 

PAS71005 

Bill Black’s Combo 

More Solid And Raunchy 

HL12023 

SHL32023 

Tom Jones 

It’s Not Unusual 

PA61004 

PAS71004 

Fortunes 

The Fortunes 

PR73002 

PRS83002 

Bill Black’s Combo 

Bill Black’s Greatest Hits 

HL12012 

SHL32012 

Bill Black’s Combo 

Mr. Beat 

HL12027 

SHL32027 

Ace Cannon 

Nashville Hits 

HL12028 

SHL32028 

Willie Mitchell 

Hold It 

HL12021 

SHL32021 

Bill Black’s Combo 

Solid And Raunchy 

HL12003 

SHL32003 

Ace Cannon 
Bill Black’s Combo 

“Tuff” Sax 

The Untouchable Sound of 

HL12007 

SHL32007 


The Bill Black Combo 

HL12009 

SHL32009 

Ace Cannon 

Aces Hi 

HL12016 

SHL32016 

Ace Cannon 

Sweet And Tuff 

HL12030 

SHL32030 

Willie Mitchell 

It’s What’s Happenin’ 

HL12031 

SHL32031 

Bill Black’s Combo 

All Timers 

HL12032 

SHL32032 

Bill Black’s Combo 

King Of The Road 

H LI 2036 

SHL32036 

Tom Jones 

Green, Green Grass Of Home 

PA61009 

PAS71009 

Tom Jones 
Othmar Schoeck 

A-Tom-ic Jones 

MACE 

Concerto in B-Flat Major 

Op. 21 for Violin and Orch/Concerto 

Op. 65 for Horn and String Orch 

PA61007 

PAS71007 
MCM/MCS 9047 

Mozart 

Piano Concerto No. 14 in E-Flat Major 
Double Chorus Motets Of The Old Masters 


MCM/MCS 9048 
MCM/MCS 9054 

Helmut Walcha 

Harpsichord-Six French Suites Vol. 1 


MCM/MCS 9072 

Handel 

Paul Hindemith 
Trio Sonatas of Bach 

Paganini 

Three Concert! 

Sonata Op. 11, No. 4 for Viola & Piano 
Sonata Op. 25, No. 1 for Viola 
Unaccompanied 
Eliott Rosoff: Violin, 

Andrew Lolya; Flute; Sally Bakstansky; 
Cello 

Roy Eaton: Piano 

Sonata Concertata for Violin & Guitar 


MCM/MCS 9063 
MCM/MCS 9075 

MCM/MCS 9076 

Marga BaumI, Guitar/Walter Klasinc, Violin 

M9025 

J. S. Bach 
F. J. Haydn 

Six English Suites Vol. 2 

Concerto in C-Major for Oboe and Orch 


MCM/MCS 9036 


& Others MCM/MCS 9040 



MAINSTREAM 



Carmen McRae 

Alfie 

56084 

6084t 

Morgana King 

With A Taste Of Honey 

56015 

6OI5; 

Jerry Goldsmith 

Original Sound 

A Patch Of Blue 

56068 

6068: 

Track 

Maurice Jarre 

The Collector 

56053 

6053 

Original Sound 
Track 

Carmen McRae 

Women Talk-Live at the Village Gate 

56065 

6065. 

Billie Holiday 

Billie Holiday 

56036 

6036. 

Lightning Hopkins 

The Blues 

56000 

6000 J 

Jack Teagarden, 

Wild Bill Davison, etc. 

Dixieland-New Orleans 

56003 

6003 : 

Carmen McRae 

Second To None 

56028 

6028 : 

Sound Track 

Clark Terry, Bob 
Brookmeyer Quintet 

The Power Of Positive Swinging 

56054 

6054 

Lester Young & The 

Prez 

56012 

6012;’! 

Kansas City Six ( 

John Berberian 

Oud Artistry Of John Berberian 

56047 

6047 V 

Jelly Roll Morton 

Jelly Roll Morton 

56020 

6020 

Morgana King 

Miss Morgana King 

56052 

6052 1 

Maynard Ferguson 

Color Him Wild 

56031 

6031 

Sound Track ; 

Piccioni-Original 
Sound Track 
Clark Terry/ 

The Tenth Victim 

56071 

60711! 

1 1 

i 

Bob Brookmeyer 

Gingerbread Men 

56086 

6086; 

Gordon Jenkins 

Soul Of A People 

56093 

6093 1 

Carmen McRae 

In Person 

56091 

6091 

Big Brother t The 


56099 

60991 

Holding Company 

The Jelly Bean Bandits 


56103 

6103 

The Amboy Dukes 

MERCURY 

56104 

6104 , 

The Platters 

Encore of Golden Hits 

MG20472 

SR60243 

The Platters 

More Encores of Golden Hits 

MG20591 

SR60252 T 

Brook Benton 

Golden Hits 

MG20607 

SR60607 . 
SR60645 , 

Sarah Vaughn 

Sarah Vaughn’s Golden Hits 

MG20645 

Brook Benton 

Golden Hits Vol. II 

M620774 

SR60774 ’ 

Clyde McPhatter 

Clyde McPhatter’s Greatest Hits 

MG20783 

SR60783 (. 

Smothers Brothers 

The Smothers Brothers at the Purple 
Onion 

MG20611 

SR69611 ' 

Horst Jankowski 

The Genius of Jankowski 

MG20993 

SR60993 

Sil Austin 

Sil Austin Plays Pretty for the People 

MG20424 

SR60424 

Sarah Vaughn 

The New Scene 

MG21079 

SR61079 

Dinah Washington 

This Is My Story 

MG20788 

SR60788 

Dinah Washington 

This Is My Story— Vol. II 

MG20789 

SR60789 

Billy Eckstine 

Golden Hits Of Billy Eckstine 

MG20796 

SR60796 

Lesley Gore 

Golden Hits 

MG21024 

SR61024 

Roy Drusky 

Roy Drusky’s Greatest Hits 

MG21052 

SR61052 

Smothers Brothers 

Think Ethnic 

MG20777 

SR60777 


Two Sides Of The Smothers Brothers 

MG20675 

SR60675 

Dave Dudley 

Lonelyville 

MG21074 

SR61074 1 

Roy Drusky & 

Together Again 

MG21078 

SR61078 

Priscilla Mitchell i 

Horst Jankowski 

Still More Genius of Jankowski 

MG21076 

SR61076 1 

Smothers Brothers 

Mom Always Liked You Best 

MG21051 

SR61051 J, 

Smothers Brothers 

Golden Hits Of The Smothers Brothers 

MG21089 

SR61089 ( 

Miriam Makeba 

All About Miriam 

MG21095 

SR61095 1 

Blues Magoos 

Psychedelic Lollipop 

MG21096 

SR61096 j 

Roy Drusky 

If The Whole World Stopped Lovin 

MG21097 

SR61097 i 

Dave Dudley 

Free And Easy 

MG21098 

SR61098 1 

Faron Young 

Unmitigated Gall 

MG21110 

SR61110| 

Johnny Mathis 

Johnny Mathis Sings 

MG21107 

SR61107J 

Jerry Butler 

Sould Artistry 

MG21105 

SR61105 ' 

Keith 

98.6/Ain’t Gonna Lie 

MG21102 

SR61102 

Chuck Berry 

Chuck Berry’s Golden Hits 

MG21103 

SR61103 : 

Dee Dee Warwick 

1 Wanna Be With You/ I’m Gonna Make 
You Love Me 

MG21110 

SR61110 ' 

Sarah Vaughn 

Sassy Swings Again 

MG21116 

SR61116k 

Dinah Washington 

Dinah Discovered 

MG21119 

SR61119ji 

Lesley Gore 

California Nights 

MG21120 

SR61120^ 

Chuck Berry 

Chuck Berry in Memphis 

MG21123 

SR61123 

Spanky & Our Gang 

Spanky & Our Gang 

MG21128 

SR61124 

Sil Austin 

Sil Austin Plays Pretty For The People 
Again 

MG21126 

SR61126 ' 

j 

Tony Randall 

Warm And Wavery 

MG21128 

SR61128 i 

Peter Knight & 
Orchestra 

Instrumental Beatle Themes from Sgt. 
Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band 

MG21132 

SR61132 j| 

Roy Drusky 

Now Is A Lonely Time 

MG21118 

SR61118 A 

Sarah Vaughn 

It’s A Man’s World 

MG21122 

SR61122 ! 

Horst Jankowski 

With Love 

MG21125 

SR61125 1 

Keith 

Out Of Crank 

MG21129 

SR61129 ; 

The Robbs 

The Robbs 

MG21130 

SR61130 ; 

Dave Dudley 

Dave Dudley Country 

MG21133 

SR61133 li 

Dick Smothers 

Saturday Night At The World 

MG21134 

SR61134 !■ 
SR61135'/ 

The Mauds 

Hold On 

MG21135 

Jim Sullivan 

Sitar Beat 

MG21137 

SR61137 : 

Chuck Berry 

Chuck Berry Live At The Fillmore 
Auditorium 
In San Francisco 

MG21138 

SR61138 i 

t 

1 


54 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 j 

ii 



CashBox lUbum Reviews 






^ n *ii(r 

tSf^ * iCxb 


Pop Bosi Bets 

BLUES ON TOP OF BLUES— B. B. King— Blues- 
way BL/BLS 6011 

There’s plenty of gospel influence on this, the 
latest in a continuing series of fine Blues waxings 
from B. B. King. The set is also marked by a 
modern, up-to-date commerciality brought about 
through the use of lots of funky brass accompani- 
ment. King’s guitar is a standout, especially on 
“I’m Not Wanted Anymore” and “Worried 
Dream.” Lying somewhere between folk blues, 
sophisticated blues, and flat out R&B, this pack- 
age seems to draw all these elements together and 
should see a good deal of spins and sales. 


TAMIKO— Tamiko Jones— December DR 8500/ 
8500 S 

Tamiko Jones, in a soft, gentle tender mood, 
offers eleven pop tunes which should bring pleas- 
ure to a wide audience. “Someone To Light Up My 
Life,” “The Folks Who Live On The Hill,” “Don’t 
Go Breaking My Heart,” and “Don’t Let Me Lose 
This Dream” are among the fine efforts. The 
artist, performing with clarity and warmth, should 
gain a large following with this disk. 


ECHOES OF ROMANCE — George Feyer — Decca 
DL 4902/74902 

Pianist George Feyer plays in a style customarily 
heard in the cocktail lounges of expensive hotels, 
but he plays with such spirit and precision that 
his performance deserves more than the casual 
attention afforded most cocktail music. On this 
album, he plays ten medlies, devoting only one 
track to a single song (“On A Clear Day You Can 
See Forever”). All in all, he works in the tunes 
of thirty-six “romantic favorites” such as “Georgy 
Girl,” “Gigi,” “Wouldn’t It Be Loverly,” and 
“Edelweiss.” 


JERUSALEM OF GOLD — Various Artists— Fon- 
tana MGF 27572/SRF 67572 

Recorded in Israel, this album includes songs 
of the six-day Arab-Israeli conflict of June 5 to 11, 
1967. The title song, sung by Shuly Nathan, is a 
lovely, sweet, lyrical tune. “We Shall Pass,” by the 
Doodaim is a rousing, brisk number. Other fine 
melodies are “I’ve Got Your Letter” and “No 
Other 'Songs,” by Nama Hendel and Benny Am- 
dursky, respectively. Interest in the history of 
Israel should boost the LP’s sales. 

Jazz Picks 



THE TIFFANY SHADE— Mainstream 56105/S 
6105 

The Tiffany iShade presents a set of rock offer- 
ings which are shot through with energy and 
urgency. “Would You Take My Mind Out For 
A Walk” is an intense, dynamic tune, and “Jaguar 
City Blues” pulsates perkily. A throbbing, shuf- 
fling effort, “Come Softly To Me” displays the 
group to great advantage. The Tiffany Shade 
could very well stir up plentious sales reaction 
with this LP. 


THERE IS A TIME— Pat & Barbara— Chetwyd 
CWS 99004 

Pat & Barbara are a folk duo par excellance. 
Their choice of material is more than apt, their 
harmonies are delightful, and their performance 
on wax has the vitality and excitement of a live 
performance. “There Is A Time,” “Poverty Hill,” 
“Noah,” and “Cornin’ Of The Roads” are outstand- 
ding tracks, bound to appeal to any folk en- 
thusiast. Though it’s a couple of years past the 
time of the big boom in folk acts, “There Is A 
Time” for Pat & Barbara and the time is now. 


FOR GREEK COLLECTORS— Various Artists— 
Odeon SX 6142 

Here’s a colorful album of Greek music com- 
posed by Manos Hadjidakis, Stavros Xarhakos, 
George Zambetas, Mikis Theodorakis, and others. 
Lovely, lilting melodies characterize “E Kyra,” 
by Hadjidakis, sung by Grigoris Bithikotsis, and 
“Chryssoprassino Fyllo,” by Theodorakis, per- 
formed by the same artist. Vicky Mosholiou 
renders Zambetas’ “Ta Thakria” is a soft, tender 
style. A most appealing LP. 


SOUL AIN’T NOTHIN’ BUT THE BLUES— Pat 
Lundy — Columbia CL 2788/CS 9588 

Soul/Blues songstress Pat Lundy could make 
a name for herself with this LP. Her flexible voice 
can belt out a rhythmic foot-stomper like the title 
ditty or a feelingful ballad like “Yesterday” with 
equal skill. Given good exposure, this set could 
chalk up nice sales figures in R&B, pop and even 
middle-of-the-road areas. 


THE COMPLETE YUSEF LATEEF— Yusef La- 
teef — Atlantic 1499/SD 1499 

This set is a journey into the wild, mystical, 
sometimes bluesy, always adventurous world of 
flautist/oboist Yusef Lateef. Three of our favorite 
tracks are “In The Evening,” the hard driving 
“Kongsberg,” and “See Line Woman,” but don’t 
limit your listening to these; everything’s good on 
this one. This LP is a strong candidate for top 
sales honors. 


LOFTY FAKE ANAGRAM— Gary Burton Quar- 
tet— RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3901 

“General Mojo Cuts Up,” “Good Citizen Swal- 
low,” and “I’m Your Pal” are highlights of this 
truly outstanding set from the Gary Burton Quar- 
tet. Larry Coryell’s incisive guitar work seems 
to spark Burton’s gentle, harmonic, approach to 
the vibes while the interplay between iSteve Swal- 
low on bass and Bobby Moses on drums provides 
an extremely facile rhythm backing. The group’s 
appeal is not limited to the jazz field (they’re big 
pop as well) so you can look for lots of sales 
action here. 

Classical Picks 



MOODY AND THE BRASS FIGURES— James 
Moody Ork and Quartet — Milestones MLP 1005/ 
MSP 9005 

Getting off to a rousing start with “Smack-A- 
Mac,” then rolling into “Bess, You Is My Woman 
Now” and “Cherokee,” the James Moody groups 
offer a sterling example of the contrapuntal style. 
Perhaps the most outstanding track on the set is 
a soft, bluesy treatment of “Love, Where Are 
You?” This package is sure to get loads of spins 
and is bound to be sought after by jazzophiles 
throughout the world. 


THE RIGHT TOUCH — Duke Pearson — Blue Note 
BLP 4267/BST 84267 

Plenty of bright, sparkling, up-tempo jazz with 
lots of brass to go with it on this set. Duke Pear- 
son is the new A&R director at Blue Note; these 
tunes are all his and reflect the grace and order 
he’s so well known for. “Make It Good,” “Scrap 
Iron,” and “Rotary” are outstanding tracks on an 
outstanding album that’s bound to see plenty of 
spins and sales. 


TCHAIKOVSKY: ‘OVERTURE 1812’/‘Marche 

Slave’/‘Romeo And Juliet’ — Von Karajan/Berlin 
Philharmonic SLPM 139029 

Three of Tchaikovsky’s most popular works re- 
ceive yet another reading on this album. Under 
the direction of Herbert Von Karajan, however, 
even the “1812 Overture” receives new breath. 
Von Karajan uses, as Tchaikovsky originally in- 
tened, a chorus (the Don Cossack Choir), instead 
of the usual orchestra to open the work. The con- 
ductor’s interpretation throughout is dynamic. 
“Marche Slave” and “Romeo And Juliet” are also 
excellently performed. 



CURTAIN CALLS! — Steinberg/Pittsburgh Sym- 
phony-Command CC 11039 SD 

This finely performed and recorded album con- 
tains works which frequently earn curtain calls 
for their performers. Dr. William Steinberg ex- 
pertly leads the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra 
through the spirited “Rakoczi March,” by Bizet; 
the lovely “Vaises Nobles Et Sentimentales,” by 
Ravel; the famed “Perpetual Motion” and 
“Tritsch-Tratsch Polkas,” by J. Strauss; and other 
noted pieces. Should sell well in classical circles. 


fcash Box — February 10, 1968 


55 





Capitol Markets Feb, LPs& Tapes 


NEW YORK— Capitol Records last 
week announced the release of 33 new 
albums, 7 new 8-track stereo tape 
cartridges and 8 new reel-to-reel stereo 
tape packages. 

New Cap Albums 

On the Capitol label itself are 21 
new albums. Highlight set is “The 
Delta Sweete,” the second LP entry of 
singer/ songwriter Bobbie Gentry. The 
LP contains twelve tunes, eight of 
which are originals, including “Oko- 
lona River Bottom Band,” “Penduli, 
Pendulum” and “Courtyard.” Jimmie 
Haskell and Shorty Rogers handled 
the arrangements for the set. 

A1 Martino and Lou Rawls, two of 
Capitol’s stars, account for two al- 
bums: “This is Martino,” and “Feelin’ 
Good,” respectively. On the strictly 
instrumental side is a ‘‘Songbook” by 
the Hollyridge Strings, containing mu- 
sic from the Beatles’ LP’s “Magical 
Mystery Tour” and “Sgt. Pepper’s 
Lonely Hearts Club Band.” The sound- 
track from “The Golden Breed,” a 
new surfer film scored by Mike Curb, 
Jerry Styner, and Harley Hatcher, 
is the fifth Capitol release for Febru- 
ary. It is backed up with another 
Jackie Gleason entry, “Doublin’ in 
Brass.” 

The singing duo of Sandler & Young 
are out with their fourth release on 
Capitol, a new album titled “Sunshine 
Days.” “BTinny How Time Slips Away” 
is singer Harry Middlebrooks” debut 
album offering on Capitol; the set was 
arranged and conducted by Bill Justis. 
Additionally, Capitol unveils two more 
new acts: the Four Amigos, with 
'“The Amigos ‘live’ at the Ilikai Hotel, 
Hawaii,” and the folk duo of Hedge & 
Donna. Veteran ork leader Guy Lom- 
bardo enlists the aid of his Royal 
Canadians for an LP called “They’re 
Playing Our Songs.” 

From the country corner come new 
albums by Jean Shepard, Bonnie 
Owens, Ferlin Husky, and James Bur- 
ton & Ralph Mooney (“Corn Pickin’ 
and Slick Slidin’”). Another premiere 
recording is that of South African 
songstress Letta Mbulu. She sings 
songs in Zulu and Xhosa, as well as 
English. 

Completing the release is five-al- 
bum look (on Capitol of the World) 
at the music of India — “The Best of 
India’s New Motion Picture Music,” 
“Carnatic Music of India,” “The Sitar 
Genius of Nikhil Banerjee,” “India’s 
Lalgudi Jayaraman Trio” and “Ravi,” 
featuring sitarist Ravi Shankar. 

Capitol Classic 

Two new additions are made to the 
C a p itol Classics series: “Stereo 
Strings,” a set in which the late Sir 
Malcolm Sarget leads the Philhar- 
monia and Royal Philharmonic Orches- 
tras in three works for strings — 
Vaughan Williams’ “Fantasia On A 
Theme Of Thomas Tallis,” Warlock’s 
“Capriol Suite” and Holst’s “St. 
Paul’s Suite”; and an album of lighter 
music by Jean Sibelius, including his 
“Karelia Overture,” “The Bard,” and 
“King Christian II Suite.” 

New Angel Sets 

From Capitol’s classical Angel label 
come 7 new sets: a set containing a 
potpourri of shorter choral works by 
Bruckner, Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, 
Wolf and Van Nuffel, performed by 
the New Philharmonia Chorus and 
Orchestra under the direction of Wil- 
helm Pitz, regular choral master for 
the Philharmonia; a new recording of 
Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3 in E Flat 
(“The Eroica”) by the B.B.C. Sym- 
phony Orchestra, Sir John Barbirolli 
conducting; a program of Mahler, in- 
cluding “Kindertotenlieder” and 
“Songs Of A Wayfarer,” by the Halle 
Orchestra, Sir John Barbirolli con- 
ducting, with mezzo-soprano Janet 
Baker as soloist; an album containing 
Ralph Vaughan Williams’ Symphony 
No. 6 and an earlier, shorter work, 
“The Lark Ascending,” performed by 
the New Philharmonia, Sir Adrian 
Boult conducting; a two-disk package 


of works by Ferruccio Busoni — his 
Piano Concerto, Opus 39, and Sara- 
band and Cortege — with pianist John 
Ogden and the Royal Philharmonic 
Orchestra and Male Chorus, Daniell 
Revenaugh conducting; a set showcas- 
ing mezzo-soprano Christa Ludwig in 
a program of Schubert songs; and an 
album spotlighting pianist Daniel Ba- 
renboim in a performance of Brahms’ 
Second Piano Concerto with the New 
Philharmonia, Sir John Barbirolli con- 
ducting. 

New Seraphim LP’s 

Angel’s Seraphim series is offer- 
ing 4 LP’s for February: “The Art 
Of Tito Gobbi,” a two-record package 
showcasing the operatic baritone in a 
performance of opera arias, classical 
concert arias, popular Italian and Nea- 
politan songs and modem concert 
songs (the package is Gobbi’s first 
song recording in many years ) ; “The 
Comic Mozart,” an LP in which four 
young German singers — Erika Koeth, 
Peter iSchreier, Herman Prey and Wal- 
ter Berry — together with the Vienna 
Academy-Chamber Chorus, offer a pro- 
gram that pokes fun at such topics as 
love and drinking (the often risque 
texts are printed in German and 
English on an accompanying leaflet; 
many of the pieces are here recorded 
for the first time) ; a set containing 
the two “L’Arlesienne” suites and the 
“Carmen” suite No. 1 by Bizet, by the 
Conservatoire Orchestra under the di- 
rection of Belgian conductor Andre 
Cluytens, who died last June; and a 
recording of Chopin’s Piano Concerto 
No. 1 in E Minor by the young Italian 
virtuoso, Maurizio Pollini. 

New Melodiya/Angel Albums 

Angel’s Melodiya / Angel series, 
which offers to the American market 
classical recordings from the U.S.S.R., 
unveils 3 albums for February: “Sta- 
bat Mater,” by Giovanni Pergolesi, 
performed by Galina Pisarenko (sopra- 
no) and Irina Arkhipova (mezzo- 
soprano) with the R.S.F.S.R. Russian 
Chorus and Moscow Chamber Orches- 
tra, Rudolf Barshai conducting; “Rus- 
sian Opera Arias And Romances” (the 
arias are from Mussorgsky’s “Boris 
Godunov” and Dzerzhinsky’s “A Man’s 
Destiny” — Dzerzhinsky’s arias receive 
their recording premier in the West 
on the set) performed by Boris Shto- 
kolov, principal basso of the Kirov 
Theater (an orchestra of balalaikas 
and other folk instruments acco-mpa- 
nies the popular songs or “romances” 
that occupy one side of the album) ; 
and the debut recording in America 
of the young Lithuanian organist, 
Harry Grodberg, which spotlights 
him playing a selection of Bach’s 
chorale preludes on the organ of the 
Moscow Conservatory. 

New Tapes 

Capitol’s February release of 8- 
track stereo tape cartridges and reel- 
to-reel stereo tape packages includes 
a number of recordings which are be- 
ing made available in both conver- 
sions. Going on the market in both 8- 
track and reel-to-reel form are: “The 
Delta Sweete,” by Bobby Gentry ; 
“Seen In Green,” by the Seekers ; “It 
Takes People Like You to Make Peo- 
ple Like Me,” by Buck Owens ; “Wel- 
come to My Love,” by Nancy Wilson; 
“*Our Garden of Hymns,” by Tennes- 
see Ernie Ford and Marilyn Horne; 
and “The Exotic Sitar and Sarod,” by 
Ravi iShankar and Ali Akbar Khan. 

Available only in 8-track stereo 
tape cartridge form, for the present 
time, is “This Is Martino,” by A1 Mar- 
tino. Available only in reel-to-reel 
stereo tape package form are two clas- 
sical recordings, one spotlighting cel- 
list Jacqueline du Pre in performances 
of cello concertos by Elgar and Delius, 
with Sir John Barbirolli and Sir Mal- 
colm Sargeant conducting, and the 
other showcasing the New Philharmo- 
nia Orchestra and Chorus, Sir Adrian 
Boult conducting, in a performance of 
Holst’s “The Planets.” 


Revere & Lindsay Tour 
To Plug New Releases 

NEW YORK — Paul Revere and Mark 
Lindsay of the Columbia rock group 
Paul Revere and the Raiders have be- 
gun a twelve-city tour to promote 
the team’s new single and album just 
released. 

Planning to meet top-40 and r&b 
deejays and program directors on 
their cross country jaunt, the twosome 
will be holding press conferences for 
local newspapers and high school re- 
porters also. There they will introduce 
“Too Much Talk,” the Raiders’ new 
single, and the “Goin’ to Memphis” 
LP. 

Cities on the coast-to-coast trip 
include : Los Angeles, Dallas, Hous- 
ton, New Orleans, Memphis, Kansas 
City, St. Louis, Cleveland, Detroit, 
New York, Seattle and Portland. 

Since joining Columbia Records 
three years ago, Paul Revere and The 
Raiders have met with consistent suc- 
cess with their singles and albums. 
Three of their LP’s, “The Spirit of 
’67,” “Midnight Ride” and “Just Like 
Us,” have earned Gold Records sig- 
nifying sales in excess of one million 
dollars as certified by the Record In- 
dustry Association of America 
(RIAA). 

In addition to their recording career, 
Paul Revere and The Raiders appear 
frequently on television shows and in 
concerts. Paul and Mark also host 
their own weekly variety television 
program, “Happening ’68,” Saturdays 
on ABC-TV. 


'If-chycoo Park' Is 
An Immediate Success 

NEW 'YORK— “Itchycoo Park,” by 
Small Faces, constitutes a solid suc- 
cess for Immediate Records, a British 
label marketed and distributed by 
. CBC Records in the U.S. The lid is 
Immediate’s first single release in this 
country. “Itchycoo Park” is number 
15 on the Top 100 this week. Based 
on the disk’s fast success, the diskery 
is releasing Small Faces’ first album, 
“There Are But Four Small Faces,” 
next week. 

Expanding on this hit foundation, 
Bruce Hinton, newly appointed man- 
ager of sales and promotion of Date, 
Ode and Immediate Records, has an- 
nounced the release of three new sin- 
gles next week from Immediate’s ros- 
ter of artists. These include “The 
Thoughts Of Emerlist Davjack,” by 
the Nice; “If You Think Y ou’re 
Groovy,” by P. P. Arnold, a record 
produced by Steve Marriott and Ron- 
nie Lane, who also produce Small 
Faces; and “Handbags And Gladrags,” 
by Chris Farlowe. 

To promote the new single by the 
Nice, Andrew Loog Oldham and Tony 
Calder, owners of Immediate Records, 
are bringing the group to this country 
for three important club dates. The 
Nice will debut at The Scene in New 
York for two weeks beginning Janu- 
ary 29. They will appear on the west 
coast at Whiskey Au Go Go in Los 
Angeles on February 14, 15 and 16, 
and at the Fillmore Auditorium in San 
Francisco on February 17 and 18. 


Liberty Offers New 
Stereo Tape Cartridge 

LOS ANGELES — A new concept in 
high fidelity four and eight track 
stereo tape cartridges has been an- 
nounced by Liberty Stereo Tape. 

Sonic Spectrum Plus, the first true 
high fidelity stereo tape cartridge, 
is a specially designed package, fea- 
turing the most expensive precision 
cartridge and the finest sound ever 
reproduced in a cartridge tape, reports 
the company. 

Liberty Stereo Tape, the first major 
to enter the cassette market and a 
leader in the four and eight track 
stereo tape fields, spent months of re- 
search designing the Sonic Spectrum 
Plus package and expanding the fre- 
quency range of the unit. 

The expanded frequency ranges 
from 60 Hz’s to 12,000 Hz’s, thus pro- 
viding the listener with a fuller and 
much cleaner sound. 

The exterior of the new cartridge ^ 
has also been improved, claims Liber- ^ 
ty Stereo Tape. Greater finger con- 
trol of the cartridge has been obtained ' 
by placing grips in the sides of the ' 
unit and ridges were added to provide 
for non-spill stacking. A plastic dust ' 
cap has been designed to keep the * 
internal parts of the cartridge com- - 
pletely dust free. ' 

“With the advent of the Sonic Spec- * 
trum Plus cartridge and its new high ! ^ 
fidelity sound quality, I feel that the j | 
buyer' who has previously rejected the ^ 
cartridge because of the sound quality ^ 
will change his mind,” said Wally Pe- 
ters, national sales manager of Liber- i 
ty Stereo Tape. | ^ 

“Sonic Spectrum Plus has taken the c 
stereo tape out of the novelty cate- ^ 
gory and placed it in the same market ^ 
as the stereo-high fidelity album.” ^ 


GRT Has Record 6 Mos. j( 

SUNNYVALE, CAL.— During the first j ■ 
six months (ending in December) of 
fiscal 1968, General Recorded Tape j 
reported sales of $2,721,630 and earn- ■ j 
ings after taxes of $220,071. These , | 
figures exceeded those for the entire | ^ 
previous fiscal year ending June 30, ; ' 
1967, when sales were $1,867,856 with j J 
net earnings of $88,053. ^ 

The two-and-a-half year old Sunny- | 
vale company produces reel-to-reel < 
tapes, four and eight- track tape 
cartridges and cassettes for use in 
home and automobile tape players. 
The company also offers custom repro- 
duction of instructional tapes used in 
education, government and industry. 

In his report to shareholders in the 
privately-owned firm, Mr. Bayley 
pointed out that the July-Decembei 
reporting period included the usual 
peak of pre-Christmas sales in No- ' 
vember. 

Bayley credited the company’s rapid 
sales rise to more products, more ef- 
fective marketing and new production 
capabilities. 



When In . . . 

The Roman Rebellion, 
recently pacted to RCA 
Victor, is shown here in 
full regalia. Their debut 
single, “Every Groovy 
Day,” is being shipped 
this week. The individual 
names of the members of 
the group ai'e: Salvatore 
Pate, Tommy Alessandre, 
Rossario Rizzi, and Mike 
Dinardo. 


56 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 



'Perpetual Motion* Begins 
As Jubilee Kicks Off Promo 

NEW YORK — Mickey Eichner, vice 
president and director of A&R and 
^national promotion for Jubilee Records, 
^as disclosed that the label has already 
initiated the strategy for its “perpet- 
ual motion” promotion handling. The 
program is designed to keep all areas 
of the country in continual service via 
a three-point major tactic. 

First, a seven man team with over- 
lapping areas of concentration blanket 
the country; second, each of the pro- 
moters works for Jubilee exclusively 
thus giving full-time effort; and, third, 
each man will follow-through with 
rack jobbers and distributors as well 
as radio station service. 

Also initiated is a system where any 
independent producer offering material 
can have a definite answer within 24 
hours. As director of A&R and as an 
officer of the company, Eichner can 
offer the independent producer one 
answer from one man — and assure him 
that nothing gets lost at Jubilee. 

Eichner noted that Jubilee maintains 
its own recording studios. Select Sound, 
and said that they are “always at the 
disposal of independent producers.” He 
noted that Select Sound has recently 
converted from 4-track to 8-track. 

In the last three months, Eichner 
said, he has made several trips to the 
West Coast, signing new producers 
and artists to Jubilee. Announcements 
of these pactings will be made soon. 

Among field men, Phil Colbert, the 
newest member to join the team will 
concentrate pimarily on R&B product. 
Stan Eddis, Charles Gray and Steve 
Wax double in the south and midwest, 
while Mervin Harmon and Harry Gold- 
stein take care of the west coast. In 
addition to providing overall direction 
for the promotion men, Eichner will 
cover the east coast along with Ben 
Blaine. 


Jimmy Wisner To Produce 
Next Gloria Lynne Single 

NEW YORK — Mercury Records’ vp 
of A&R, Charles Fach has enlisted 
i arranger-conductor-producer J immy 

j Wisner to produce the next single for 
I Gloria Lynne, who records for Mer- 
jcury’s Fontana label. 

Wisner’s track record, includes, most 
I recently, the arranging and conducting 
I chores on the latest Chris and Peter 
I Allen Mercury single, “Ten Below” 
I and those same chores on a soon-to-be- 
, released Barbara Streisand single. 

Wisner arranged and conducted three 
straight chart singles for Spanky and 
Our Gang (Mercury) and is currently 
represented on the Top 100 as a pro- 
, ducer by Jim and Jean’s “People 
World.” 

Wisner will have his first recording 
session with Gloria Lynne for her new 
single on February 23rd. 


Mampe To Mercury Post 

NEW YORK — Mercury Records has 
appointed M. Scott Mampe as director 
of publicity, reviewer services, and 
artist relations, effective February 5. 
The announcement was made by Joe 
Bott, recently named sales manager 
of the classical division of the label. 

Miss Mampe brings to her new post 
an extensive background in classical 
music. She was most recently music 
director of radio station WRVR-FM 
in New York City where she was 
involved in both programming and 
production of a variety of classical 
music shows. Prior to that, she served 
as assistant program director at Phil- 
adelphia’s WFLN and WFLN-FM and 
from 1962 to 1964 was acting music 
director of WKAR and WKAR-FM in 
East Lansing, Michigan, while a grad- 
uate assistant at Michigan State Uni- 



M. Scott Mampe 


versity from which she obtained a 
master’s degree in communication arts 
in 1964. 

During the summer of 1963 Miss 
Mampe was a TV production specialist 
with the United States Information 
Agency (USIA) working with the 
Federal government agency under a 
training program helmed by the then 
director of USIA, Edward R. Murrow. 
She is a Magna Cum Laude graduate 
of Ithaca College, class of 1962, and 
a member of Pi Kappa. Lamba, profes- 
sional music honorary; Alpha Epsilon 
Rho, professional radio-TV honorary 
and the Oracle, academic honorary. 

Working with Bott, Miss Mampe 
will handle publicity and promotion 
of classical product for the Mercury, 
Philips and economy line World Series 
labels. 


Command Re-Inks Dick Hyman; 
Fields 2 LP Tracks As Single 

NEW YORK — Dick Hyman, pianist/ 
organist, has re-inked with Command 
Records as of this week. The label has 
just released a single pairing “In 
The Heat Of The Night” with 



Becker & Hyman 


Respect,” both off Hyman’s current 
“Mirrors” LP. 

Loren Becker, vice president and 
general manager of Command, pointed 
out that “Mirrors has been causing 
quite a stir in both pop and R&B 
markets throughout the country; pri- 
marily in Baltimore, Chicago, Atlanta, 
Boston, and Philadelphia. Radio re- 
action to the LP has been especiallly 
strong on the two cuts mentioned 
here, and has resulted in their being 
released as single. 


Atlantic’s John Hammond Jr. 
Contracted By Peter Leeds 

NEW YORK — Peter Leeds has signed 
Atlantic’s John Hammond Jr. to a 
management contract and booked the 
artist onto the Jimi Hendrix bill at 
the Mar. 2nd Hunter College concert. 
Leeds also manages Every Mothers’ 
Son and the Carnival Connection. 

Leeds maintains a loft in Manhattan 
for the rehearsal and development of 
his acts. “I have a very definite feeling 
about management,” Leeds says. 
“Management is a big job and it’s not 
fair to an act of mine to dilute my 
time on another just because it has the 
power to make a commission for me. 
I want acts that are quality. It’s just 
plain good business.” 

Leeds rides herd on three acts 
through his MJA management firm. In 
speaking of the Carnival Connection, 
he mentioned that they are still with- 
out a recording contract and that he 
is still in the process of grooming 
them for what he feels will be their 
debut. 


Four Star In 
Expansion Move 

LOS ANGELES — Immediate author- 
ity to expand Four Star International’s 
activities in the music field has been 
given to A1 Perry, vice president of 
music of the company, according to 
David B. Charnay, board chairman, 
president, and chief executive officer. 

Perry has named Fred Benson gen- 
eral professional manager of Four 
Star Television Music Co. and BNP 
Music Publishing Co., two of the com- 
pany’s subsidiaries. 

Other personnel appointments in- 
cluded in the expansion are Shirley 
Clouh to head contracts, copyrights, 
ad licenses, and Jody Pollock as co- 
ordinator of writers relations. 

Perry stated that as part of the 
authorized increase he has acquired 
songs from four well-known compo- 
sers, Chuck Jones and Norma Green, 
Hal Blair and Dean Kay. 

“In line with our expansion, we are 
looking for qualified catalogues and 
songs,” Perry said. 

Also acquired was the Italian song, 
“La Campagnia Del Larallala,” for 
which Perry will have English lyrics 
written. 

Perry was recently named to the 
new position of vice president of music 
by Charnay and the Four Star Inter- 
national board of directors. 


Little Tony To WB-7 Arts 

BEVERLY HILLS— Warner Bros. 
Seven Arts Records has signed little 
Tony, often referred to as the Elvis 
Presley of Italy, to a recording con- 
tract. Deal is not exclusive since Tony 
waxes in Rome for Durium Records 
but his pact with the Burbank diskery 
calls for the right to his recordings in 
all English speaking countries. Con- 
tract is reciprocal with the Italian 
waxery whereby they obtain rights to 
Tony’s disks in other parts of the 
world. 

Initial release is a single “I Love 
Mary,” which Tony cut in Rome. 
Future plans call for Tony to be 
brought here for recordings and tested 
for a possible film pact. Tony is 23 
years old, has made five motion pic- 
tures and recorded two albums — both 
of which reportedly sold over 1 million 
copies. 


Play Shows ‘Brel Alive 
And Weir In Col Alubum 

NEW YORK — Columbia Records has 
completed the original cast recording 
of “Jacques Brel Is Alive And Well 
Living In Paris,” a new musical pre- 
sentation that is now playing at the 
Village Gate. 

Based on the songs of the famous 
French composer-performer, the play 
(of sorts) features Elly Stone, Shawn 
Elliott, Alice Whitfield and Mort Shu- 
man. Twenty-six of Brel’s songs are 
presented in a series of sketches in 
the program. 

Production and English translations 
of the lyrics are the work of Eric 
Blau and Mort Shuman, both well- 
known songwriters. 

The two-record original cast album, 
scheduled for release shortly, was pro- 
duced by Edward Kleban 

“Jacques Brel Is Alive and Well” is 
the first presentation of a large por- 
tion of Brel’s works in this country 
though he is extremely popular 
throughout Europe and has had many 
of his songs recorded by American 
artists. 


Techniques Complete Tour 

CHICAGO — Jay and the Techniques 
returned home to Allentown, Pa. k*st 
week after completing a three-week 
and 10,000 miles promotion and ap- 
pearance tour. 

The seven-man team wrapped up 
their travels with an appearance in 
Charlotte, N.C., the fifteenth major 
city on their swing. Travel was ac- 
complished in a specially equipped 20- 
seat Convair 240 that enabled the 
group to reach more cities more con- 
veniently on the tour. They hit more 
than 40 radio stations and at least 30 
teen-oriented television shows on the 
journey. 

Currently climbing the best seller 
lists with their third Smash single, 
“Strawberry Shortcake,” Jay and the 
Techniques, and Smash’s national 
promo director Jerry Seabolt praised 
the local promotion staffs which 
backed visits to their area with ads, 
publicity and local support. 

Rory Bourke, Smash’s national prod- 
uct manager, complimented Seabolt 
and the local staffs on their handling 
of the trip, adding that he was “espe- 
cially pleased with the way station 
personnel so warmly greeted our peo- 
ple on the tour.” 

Group’s manager Gene Kaye praised 
the project and stated that highlights 
of the trip were appearances on the 
Joey Bishop Show, and as half-time 
entertainment at the basketball game 
between the country’s two top ranked 
college teams, UCLA & Houston at 
the Houston Astrodome (20). 

Although Kaye did not make specific 
reference, he and Bourke indicated 
that other major tours of the team 
and other Smash recording acts are 
possible in the near future. 


Gerry Purcell Inks Devones 

NEW YORK — Universal Attractions’ 
newest femme discovery, the Devones, 
have just signed a recording contract 
with the G. W. Purcell organization. 
'The three larks hail from Princeton, 
N.J. and will soon see their first re- 
lease on the Kapp label. Session will 
be produced by Purcell and arranged 
by Tiacho Wiltshire, w'ho are respon- 
sible for the Hesitations’ current “Born 
Free” dock. 



What Now 

The winner of a sitar in 
the World Pacific “Win A 
Sitar” contest from the 
New Jersey branch is 
shown here, now he’ll have 
to learn how to play it. 
(From the left) Vito Sam- 
ela. Liberty branch man- 
ager in Teaneck, N. J.; 
Kevin DiFelice, winner; 
and Murray Frank, man- 
ager of the winning store 
. . . Sam Goody’s in Para- 
mus, N. J. 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


57 


Chart Inks Lloyd Green 

NASHVILLE— steel guitarist Lloyd 
Green, named the Most Promising In- 
strumentalist in the 1967 Cash Box 
deejay poll, has been signed to a rec- 
ording contract with Chart Records. 
Formerly recording with Litttle Dar- 
lin’ Records, Green now joins a roster 
that includes Lynn Anderson, Jim 



William & Green 


Nesbitt, Junior Samples, Gordon Terry, 
Kirk Hansard and Ott Stephens. 

Chart topper Slim Williamson, who 
made the announcement of the signing, 
stated that plans are already under- 
way for Green to cut an instrumental 
LP of current hit tunes. 

Green has become one of the leading 
sidemen on the Nashville scene, con- 
sistently represented on the charts in 
recordings by such names as Faron 
Young, Charlie Pride, Warner Mack 
and Lynn Anderson. The latter two 
use his services exclusively. He has 


Lissauer Rubbery Gets 
All Of Pullins Catalog 

NEW YORK — The Robert Lissauer 
Publishing Corporation (ASCAP) 
which, with Sleepy Hollow Music, has 
been co-publishing well-known writer 
and Kapp artist Leroy Pullins’ mate- 
rial, has purchased Sleepy Hollow 
Music interest to all the Leroy Pullins 
material thereby acquiring 100% in- 
terest in the Pullins catalogue and 
also takes over the exclusive writer 
pact with Pullins. Transaction includes 
11 Pullins copyrights amongst which 
some of the best known are “Knee 
Deep,” “I’m A Nut,” and “The Tater- 
ville Women’s Auxiliary Sewing Cir- 
cle.” At the same time Lissauer has 
also acquired Sleepy Hollow’s interest 
in a quantity of other material includ- 
ing “High Flying Bird” and “The 
Interstate Is Coming Through My 
Outhouse,” which has just been re- 
leased by Leroy Pullins on Kapp. 

Billy Edd Wheeler who headed up 
Sleepy Hollow and Bob Lissauer will 
continue to co-manage and co-produce 
Leroy Pullins for Kapp. 

also been featured as a lead artist in 
several albums, on the Little Darlin’ 
and Time labels, and several singles 
on Little Darlin’. 

In addition, he has had a hand in 
independent production work, with two 
disks, Vern Stovall’s “Dallas” and 
Donna Harris’ “He Was Almost Per- 
suaded,” acquiring chart status. He 
has also acted in the capacity of ad- 
ministrative assistant in the Nashville 
offices of SESAC, a position which he 
held for over three years. 

Chart Records is distributed by the 
RCA Victor organization. 


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Country On Stagre 


,1 


GEORGE HAMILTON IV 


NEW YORK — A funny thing hap- 
pened to George Hamilton IV on his 
way to the forum. He realized the ex- 
tent of his popularity when he met a 
teeny-bopper and asked her if she 
knew of George Hamilton IV. “No,” 
she answered, “But I know ‘I’m Hen- 
ry VII, I Am’.” 

At the risk of dating both George 
and ourselves with “remember whens,” 
the Hamilton gag brought to mind a 
time when every teeny-bopper in the 
the country knew the name as a result 
of “A Rose And A Baby Ruth.” But 
George’s appeal is a bit more diversi- 
fied nowadays. His following includes 
the country fan, both the young and 


Nashyille NARAS Board 
Names Banquet Lineup 

NASHVILLE — The Nashville chapter 
of NARAS has booked Roger Miller, 
Glenn Campbell and Booker T & the 
MG’s for the forthcoming Awards 
Banquet, scheduled for Feb. 29 at the 
local National Guard Armory. In mak- 
ing the announcement, chapter presi- 
dent Buddy Killen stated that the 
bookings of additional acts are to be 
announced shortly. 

It was further announced by Charlie 
Lamb, executive director for the Music 
City branch of NARAS, that the board 
members had decided to meet weekly 
from now until banquet time in order 
to give the awards dinner their full 
attention. 


the old, a good deal of the college ( 
crowd and, lately, a smattering of folk | 
buffs. I 

Speaking of folk buffs and things | 
folk, his latest ‘bag’ has been the folk- I 
country idiom, which comprised a C 
a major part of his act at the Nash- I 
ville Club last week, and which, we | 
feel, fits him like the proverbial glove. *i 

George tells us (the audience) that ^ 
he digs the writings of such contem- I 
porary folksmiths as Joanie Mitchell f 
and Gordon Lightfoot. But he doesn’t 
really have to tell us — it’s evident. 
And it’s evident that most of his fans 
dig his interpretations of their mate- 
rial (“Urge For Going,” “Early Morn- ; [ 
ing Rain” and even Loudermilk’s ] 
“Urge For Going”), ! 

As far as his performance at the | 
Nashville Room goes, there’s a quality ' 
about the fourth Mr. Hamilton that 
makes him immediately likeable on 
stage (coincidentally it works off 
stage, too). His approach to the audi- 
ence is neither stilted nor brash, but,*' 
pleasantly, a happy medium between ' 
the two. 

A spotlight mention should also go • 
to his backup boys. Gene Slone and ^ 
Johnny Weathers, who jointly form | 
The Numbers, and who let loose with i 
some nifty soloizing here and there ! 
on fiddle, bass and guitar. I 

Fortunately the country music busi- 
ness is one area, at least, where Leo 
Durocher strikes out with his com- I 
ment that “Nice guys finish last.” r 


CaABoae Top Country JUbums 


1 BY THE TIME 

I GET TO PHOENIX 2 

Glen Campbell (Capitol T/ST 2851) 

2 YOU MEAN THE 

WORLD TO ME 3 

David Houston (Epic LN 24338/BN 26338) 

3 ALL THE TIME 4 

Jack Greene (Decca DL 4904/DL 4904) 

4 BRANDED MAN 5 

Merle Haggard (Capitol T/ST 2789) 

5 TURN THE WORLD AROUND 1 

Eddy Arnold (RCA Victor LPM (LSP 3869) 

6 the country way 7 

Charley Pride (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3895) 

7 WHAT LOCKS THE DOOR 8 

Jack Greene (Decca DL 4939/74939) 

8 QUEEN OF HONKY 

TONK STREET 6 

Kitty Wells (Decca DL 4929/DL 74929) 

9 SING ME BACK HOME 9 

Merle Haggard (Capitol T/ST 2848) 

10 GENTLE ON MY MIND 10 

Glen Campbell (Capitol MT/ST 2809) 


11 IT TAKES PEOPLE LIKE YOU 13 

Buck Owens (Capitol T/ST 2841) 

12 LAURA (What's He Got 

That I Ain't Got) 9 

Leon Ashley (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3900) 

13 BILL ANDERSON'S 

GREATEST HITS 14 

(Decca DL 4839/74859) 

14 RAY PRICE'S GREATEST HITS 

VOL. 2 15 

(Columbia CL 2670/CS 9470) 

15 LOVE'S GONNA HAPPEN 

TO ME 19 

Wynn Stewart (Capitol T/ST 2849) 


16 

WHAT DOES IT TAKE 12 

Skeeter Davis (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3876) 

17 

THIS IS JAN HOWARD 
COUNTRY 

Jan Howard (Decca DL 4904/DL7 4931) 

18 

18 

SINGIN' WITH FEELING 

Loretta Lynn (Decca DL 4930/DL7 4930 

16' 

1 

19 

I'LL HELP YOU FORGET HER 

Dotti West (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3830) 

20 1 

20 

BEST OF EDDY ARNOLD 

(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3565) 

22 

21 

THE ONE & ONLY 

Waylon Jennings (RCA Victor 
CAL/CAS 2183) 

21 , 

22 

JUST BETWEEN YOU & ME 

Porter Wagoner & Dolly Parton 
(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3926) 


23 

THE BUCKAROOS STRIKE 
AGAIN 

(Capitol T/ST 2828) 

17 

24 

OUR WAY OF LIFE 

Bobby Goldsboro & Del Reeves 
(United Artists UAL 3615/UAS 6615) 

25 

i 

25 

GEMS BY JIM 24 

Jim Ed Brov/n (RCA Victor LPM-SLP 3853) 

26 

DAVID HOUSTON'S 
GREATEST HITS 

(Epic BN 26342) 


27 

SOUL OF COUNTRY 

Connie Smith 

(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3889) 

30 

28 

TAKE ME TO YOUR WORLD/ 

1 DON'T WANNA PLAY HOUSE 

Tammy Wynette (Epic BN 26353) 

29 

EVER LOVIN' WORLD OF 
EDDY ARNOLD 

(RCA Victor LPM, LSP 3931) 


30 

PHANTOM 309 

Red Sovine (Starday LP, LSP 414) 



Cash Box — February 10, 1968| ^ 


58 




GEORGE JORES 


THE MOST CONSISTENT 
CHARTMAKER IN THE COUNTRY FIELD! 





JUST SHIPPED 
A FABULOUS NEW ALBUM 
WITH SONGS WRITTEN 
ESPECIALLY FOR GEORGE JONES 
BY THAT GREAT COMPOSER 
DALLAS FRAZIER 


GEORGE JONES SINGS THE SONGS OF 
DALLAS FRAZIER 

MUSICOR MS3149 

AVAILABLE ON 4 & 8 TRACK CARTRIDGE FROM ITCC. 

GEORGE JONES BOOKED BY 
THE HUBERT LONG AGENCY NASHVILLE, TENN, 


MUSICOR 1289 


NOI/I^ HIS LA TEST SINGLE ZOOMING TO THE TOP 




SAY ITS NOT YOU 

WRITTEN BY DALLAS FRAZIER • PRODUCED BY PAPPY DAILY 
BACKED WITH "THE POOR CHINEE" 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


59 


CashBox 



Country LP Reviews 




eau. .-wefisSoM S; 






FOR LOVING YOU — Bill Anderson & Jan How- 
ard — Decca DL 4959/74959 

The sales potential of this duet package by Bill 
Anderson and Jan Howard can be estimated by a 
look at the recent smash success of the title track, 
“For Loving You,” in its chart-topping run as a 
single. In addition, the well-paired twosome gen- 
erate additional excitement with some beautiful 
harmony on such standard tracks as “Above And 
Beyond (The Call Of Love),” “I Walk The Line” 
and “Have I Told You Lately That I Love You.”' 
Guaranteed to move rapidly from dealers’ shelves. 


WHO SAYS GOD IS DEAD— Loretta Lynn— 
Decca DL 4928/74928 

Consistently riding high as countrydom’s cham- 
peen gal disk seller, Loretta Lynn oifers another 
collection of inspirational tunes done up with her 
inimitable stylings. Country ‘souT is the keynote 
in this set as Loretta combines hymn-like spir- 
ituals (“I Believe”) with rousing gospel numbers 
(“He’s Got The Whole World In His Hands”), all 
of which adds up to one heck of a catalog piece. 
No doubt about the saleability of this one. 


HANGIN’ ON — Waylon Jennings — RCA Victor 
LMP/LSP 3918 

Steadily growing in stature as a both singles 
and an album seller for RCA Victor, Waylon Jen- 
nings comes up with what should be another ex- 
cellent sales piece in this latest LP. The songster 
mixes it up deftly, offering a bit of well-known 
material and stirring in a dash of lesser known 
material, highlighting the entire session with his 
recent chart smash, “The Chokin’ Kin.” Tracks 
such as “The Crowd” and “Gentle On My Mind” 
make for some real good listening. 


THE JIMMY DEAN SHOW— RCA Victor LPM/ 
LSP 3890 

The on-stage proficiency of Jimmy Dean has 
been captured beautifully for his legion of fol- 
lowers in this ‘live” LP, recorded at Harrah’s 
Club in Reno, Nev. A crowd-pleaser from be- 
ginning to end, Jimmy has his ‘live” audience 
in the bag from his opener, “Are You From 
Dixie,” to his rollicking closer, ‘Old Time Reli- 
gion,” and should have a good many disk fans 
equally in the bag with the set. Light patter and 
Dean-associated tracks such as “Nine Pound Ham- 
mer” and “Big Bad John” add consumer appeal. 

PROMISES, PROMISES — Lynn Anderson — Chart 
CHM/CHS 1004 

One of the fastest rising of the female artists 
on the country horizon, Lynn Anderson offers her 
second LP for public consumption, and can look 
forward to some excellent sales reactio ntoward 
the piece. Getting the set underway with her cur- 
rent smash, “Promises, Promises,” Liz gets a wide 
variety of material into the session, ranging from 
the blues-filled “Crying,” through the moving 
“Love Of The Common People” and the galloping 
“I’ve Been Everywhere.” Distribs will find some 
healthy reaction here. 


JUST FOR YOU— Ferlin Husky— Capitol T/ST 
2870 

In addition to the enticement of his current hit 
single, “Just For You,” after which this LP has 
been titled, Ferlin Husky offers fans an extra 
juicy tid-bit in the package with the inclusion of 
his recent biggie, “You Pushed Me Too Far.” 
Mix in ten other great tracks, most of which have 
recently decorated either pop or country charts, 
spice them all with top-notch Husky interpreta- 
tions and the result is a tasty platter for country 
connoisseurs. 


HEART TO HEART — Jean Shepard — Capitol T/ 
ST 2871 

Warm vocals set to a traditional country theme 
highlight Jean iShepard’s performance on her 
latest Capitol album. Whether handling a love bal- 
lad in the vein of “Paper Mansions,” a happy 
romper a la “True Love’s A Blessing” or a strong 
rock-type mover the likes of “Break My Mind,” 
Jeannie is a cinch to please lots of country buyers. 
Set makes a nice addition to the Shepard catalog. 



A WOMAN IN LOVE — Bonnie Guitar — Dot DLP 
3840/25840 

The silky voice of Bonnie Guitar proved to be a 
winner with her single outing of “A Woman In 
Love,” and that vocalizing should lend the same 
emphasis to this followup album. 'ITie LP packs 
a double wallop for consumers with the added in- 
centive of her current chart climber, “Stop The 
Sun,” which is also included among the grooves. 
The fine handling of such goodies as “Paper 
Roses” and “Sweet Dreams” also for some fine 
listening in this one. 


THE 12 TOP COUNTRY HITS OF THE YEAR— 
Larry Butler — Imperial LP 9365/12365 

Larry Butler’s keyboard styling have made him 
one of the more popular sidemen on the Nashville 
scene and have recently brought him out into the 
spotlight as a recording artist in his own right. 
Flavoring his catchy workouts on the ivories with 
an orchestra and chorus backing, Butler tinkles 
out a list of nothing but winners, headed by such 
monsters as “King Of The Road” and “Almost 
Persuaded,” among others, making a real easy- 
to-listen-to performance. 


TRAVELIN’ MAN— Cal Smith-Kapp KL1544/KS 
3544 

The small, but first-rate Cal Smith catalog of 
albums gets beefed up with another tasty morsel 
here. Between stops on his travelin’ itinerary, 
which includes “Oklahoma,” “Destination Atlanta, 
G.A.” and “Alone And Broke In Birmingham,” 
Smith takes time out for a heartbreak or two, dish- 
ing out such blues-filled material as “I Don’t See 
How I Can Make It” and “Did She Ask About 
Me.” Nice catalog piece. 


LIZ ANDERSON SINGS HER FAVORITES— 
RCA Victor LPM/ LSP 3908 

A highly credited songwriter in her own right, 
Liz Anderson devotes this package to the hit writ- 
ings of some of her contemporaries in the country 
music field. Kicking off the package with the mul- 
ti-market monster, “Ode To Billie Joe,” Liz runs I 
the gamut of current and recent chart material, 
encompassing such winners as “Your Tender Lov- 
ing Care,” “Ppartment #9” and her own Victor 
single, “Thanks A Lot For Trying Anyway.” 


THE 1ST OF SONNY CURTIS— Viva V36012 
With great success as a songwriter, in addition 
to his disk success. Sonny Curtis comes across 
with his first Viva LP, sparked by some of his 
most notable pieces of pen-manship. His own chart 
success of “I Wanna Go Bummin’ Around” high- 
lights the set and is complemented nicely by such 
past winners as “Walk Right Back” and “I Fought 
The Law,” to name a few. The package may es- 
tablish the artist as a first-rate album seller. 


THE SON OF HICKORY HOLLER’S TRAMP— 
Johnny Darrell — United Artists UAL 3634/ UAS | 
6634 I 

There’s no reason to believe that this latest | 
Johnny Darrell LP won’t soon be following a sales ■ 
pattern similar to the songster’s current hit 
single, “The Son Of Hickory Holler’s Tramp,” 
which is also the title track here. Hand-picking 
the ripe ones from the contemporary chart crop, ; 
Darrell has plucked such recent goodies as 
“Goodbye Wheeling,” “My Elusive Dreams” and 
“Hangin’ On” for inclusion in the set. Looks like 
a healthy sales piece. 


BURNING SAND, PEARL SHELLS & STEEL 
GUITARS— Jerry Byrd— Monument MLP 8081/ 
LSP 18081 

Here’s a pretty package of dreamy pop ballads J 
done up instrumentally by steel man Jerry Byrd, j 
The delicate melodies get some special handling I 
by the artist, who creates some fine listening I 
material with his interpretations of such ever- 
greens as “Yellow Bird,” “Maria Elena” and | 
“Danny Boy,” among others. This set should get j 
action from sweet music fans in both the country J 
and pop areas. « 


60 


J 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 









“You’ve got a giant on your hands!” 

RALPH EMERY, WSM, Nashville 

“New dimension— Double Hit! 

Two great artists at their best!” 

LEE ARNOLD, WJRZ, Newark 

That’s the reaction to the big new Victor single 

THE DARK END OF THE STREET 

'9401 

ARCHIE CAMPBELL & LORENE MANN 


Here are some more top DJs who are on this record: 


Mac Curtis, WPLO, Atlanta 
Bob Finnigan,WWVA, Wheeling 
Mike Hanes, WYDE, Birmingham 
Jim Beatty, WWOK, Charlotte 
ClaudeTomlinson, WIVK, Knoxville 
Ed Hamilton, WENO, Nashville 


Paul Perry, WENO, Nashville 
Don Howser, WENO, Nashville 
Neal Merritt, WENO, Nashville 
Hap Wainright, WYAN, Mobile 
Bob Jennings, WLAC, Nashville 
Jay Perry, WHBO, Tampa 


Tom Reeder, WDON, Wheaton, Maryland 
Dave Carr, WEXL, Detroit 
Dave Olson, WMGS, Bowling Green 
Don Evans, WEEP, Pittsburgh 
Boots Rabell, KSON, San Diego 


And these great stations are also on it: 

WONW, Fairfield, Ohio WLAC, Nashville KOGT, Orange, Texas 

WBZI, Xenia, Ohio WMNI, Columbus, Ohio Channel X, Hickory, N. C. 

WMTS, Murfreesboro, Tenn. KIKK, Houston, Texas WXCL, Peoria, III. 

WGBG, Greensboro, N.C. WKMF, Flint, Mich. KLOL, Lincoln, Neb. 

KTCR, Minneapolis, Minn. WJAB, Portland, Maine KBAR, Burley, Idaho 

WHIN, Gallatin, Tenn. KUSN,St. Joseph, Mo. WELE, Daytona Beach, Fla. 

WIBW, Topeka, Kan. WOAH, Miami, Fla. WMIL, Milwaukee, Wis. 




^ash Box — February 10, 1968 


61 


1 

3 

6 

2 

4 

97) 

5 

12 

11 

9 

10 

13 

14 

8 

15 

18 

16 

7 

17 

22 

24 

21 

23 

19 

28 

30 

29 

27 

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37 


Top 50 


CttABiw Country Reviews 


30 tell MAUDE I SLIPPED 31 

(Champion— BM I ) 

Red Sovine (Starday 823) 

31 CHILDHOOD PLACES 33 

(Jewel— ASCAP) 

Dottie West (RCA Victor 9377) 

ALL RIGHT I'LL SIGN 
THE PAPERS . 39 

(Cedarwood— BMI) 

Mel Tillis (Kapp 881) 

DARK END OF THE STREET 38 

(Press— BMI) 

Archie Campbell & Lorene Mann 
(RCA Victor 9401) 

MY CAN DO CAN'T KEEP 
UP WITH MY WANT TO 40 

(Stuckey— BMI) 

Nat Stuckey (Paula 387) 

35 THIS ONE'S ON THE HOUSE 35 

(Forest Hills— BMI) 

Jerry Wallace (Liberty 56001) 

TOGETHERNESS 41 

(Blue Book— BMI) 

Freddie Hart (Kapp 879) 

STOP THE SUN 45 

(Acclaim, Rapport— BMI) 

Bonnie Guitar (Dot 17057) 

YOUR LILY WHITE HANDS 43 

(Blue Echo— BMI) 

John Carver (Imperial 66268) 

39 WEAKNESS IN A MAN 31 

(Galllco-BMI) 

Roy Drusky (Mercury 72742) 


FOGGY RIVER 46 

(Milene-ASCAP) 

Carl Smith (Columbia 44396) 

THE DAY THE WORLD 
STOOD STILL 47 

(Hall-Clement— BMI) 

Charly Pride (RCA Victor 9403) 

HOW LONG WIL MY BABY 
BE GONE 50 

(Bluebook-BMI) 

Buck Owens (Capitol 2080) 

WALK ON OUT OF MY 
MIND 49 

(Tree-BMI) 

Waylon Jennings (RCA Victor 9414) 


44 WRONG SIDE OF THE 

WORLD 42 

(Freeway— BMI) 

Hugh X. Lewis (Kapp 868) 

LUZIANNA 52 

(Tuesday— BMI) 

Webb Pierce (Decca 32246) 

46 the day you stopped 

LOVING ME 34 

(May hew— BMI) 

Bobby Helms (Little Darlin' 0034) 

BABY'S BACK AGAIN 53 

(Marchor— BMI) 

Connie Smith (RCA Victor 9413) 



THANKS A LOT FOR TRYING 
ANYWAY 51 

(Glaser-BMI) 

Liz Anderson (RCA Victor 9378) 

SAY IT'S NOT YOU — 

(Glad/Blue Crest— BMI) 

George Jones (Musicor 1289) 

HERE COMES THE RAIN 
BABY — 

(AcuFF- Rose BMI) 

Eddy Arnold (RCA Victor 9437) 


51 EVERYBODY'S GOT TO BE 
SOMEWHERE 

Johnny Dollar (Date 1585) 

52 DOWN IN THE FLOOD 

Flatt & Scruggs (Columbia 44380) 

53 LOUISVILLE 

LeRoy Van Dyke (Warner Bros. 7155) 

54 GREENWICH VILLAGE FOLK 
SONG SALESMAN 

Jim & Jesse (Epic 10263) 

55 TOGETHERNESS 

Gordon Terry (Chart 1014) 

56 I WOULDN'T CHANGE A 
THING ABOUT YOU 

Hank Williams, Jr. (MGM 13857) 

57 BARBARA 

George Morgan (Starday 825) 

58 MY BIG TRUCK DRIVIN' MAN 

Kitty Wells (Decca 32247) 

59 SMOKE, SMOKE, SMOKE '68 

Tex Williams (Boone 1069) 

60 BY THE TIME YOU GET TO 
PHOENIX 

Wanda Jackson (Capitol 2085) 


Picks oi the Week 


LORETTA LYNN (Decca 32264) 

Fist City (2:10) Sure-Fire BMI-Lynn 

Loretta Lynn has been having her share of troubles with husband-poachers 
in recent times — first it was “You Ain’t Woman Enough” and now it’s “Fist 
City.” Ain’t no doubt who’s gonna come out on top in this battle — smart 
money is on Loretta all the way. Flip: “Slowly Killing Me” (2:24) [Sure-Fire 
BMI-Lynn] 


DEL REEVES & BOBBY GOLDSBORO (United Artists 50243) 

Our Way Of Life (2:42) [Gringo, Skol BMI-Curtis] 

Yanked from their current chart LP, “Our Way Of Life,” this Bobby Golds- 
borq-Del Reeves version of the title track should be in line for lots and lots 
of air activity. The two have combined to come up with a fine, highly appeal- 
ing sound that could well span two markets. Flip: “I Just Wasted The Rest” 
(2:14) [Moss Rose BMI-Lewis] 


CLAUDE GRAY (Decca 32266) 

The Easy Way Out (2:20) [Vanjo BMI-Russell] 

Following quickly behind his winning lid of “See How Fast Them Trucks 
Can Go,” Claude Gray offers what should be another chartsville item in “The 
Easy Way Out.” Changing pace to a ballad this time, Claude makes for some 
appealing listening with this smoothly handled ballad. Flip: “Your Devil 
Memory” (2:10) [Vanjo BMI-Gray, Wright] 


LIZ & LYNN ANDERSON (RCA Victor 9445) 

Mother, May I (2:02) [Greenback BMI-L. L. Anderson] 

Take the sales appeal of mother Liz Anderson, add the impact of daughter 
Lynn Anderson and the result is bound to be a lofty chart niche for “Mother, 
May I?” The self-penned number should be played heavily by deejays and 
grabbed up quickly by fans. Flip: “Better Than Life Without You” (2:01) 
[Yonah BMI-Anderson] 


BILLY WALKER (Monument 1055) 

Sundown Mary (2:42) [Combine BMI-Gantry, Baunach] 

Not far behind his recent “I Taught Her Everything She Knows” charter, 
Billy Walker comes up with a plaintive item called “Sundown Mary.” The 
bittersweet melody should stand him in good stead with hordes of country 
buyers. Looks good. Flip: “Oh, Matilda” (2:32) [Matamoros BMI-Walker] 


DAVE DUDLEY (Mercury 72779) 

There Ain’t No Easy Run (2:56) [Newkeys BMI-Dudley, Hall] 

Still making noise with “Anything Leaving Town Today,” Dave Dudley 
comes on strong with another gear-jamming stanza, this one called “There 
Ain’t No Easy Run.” Instilled with some of the flavor of “I’ve Been Every- 
where,” this one could zoom. Flip: “Why I Can’t Be With You (Is A Shame)” 
(2:54) [Newkeys BMI-Dudley] 


JEANNIE SEELY (Monument 1054) 

Welcome Home To Nothing (2:11) [Pamper BMI-Cochran] 

Jeannie Seely offers a change of pace with her latest Monument outing, 
“Welcome Home To Nothing.” This well-done bouncer should bounce right 
up to a nice chart berth, adding another notch to Jeannie’s hit string. Flip: 
“Maybe I Should Leave” (2:15) [Pamper BMI-Seely] 


TEX RITTER (Capitol 2097) 

Bump Tiddil Dee Bum Bum (2:07) [Vidor BMI-Walker] 

Looks like Tex Ritter should be in store for another visit to Chartland 
with this piece of material tabbed “Bump Tiddil Dee Bump Bump.” The 
light, happy-go-lucky sound should see lots of action as a result of the artist’s 
current wave of popularity. Flip: “I Just Can’t Get Away (From These Old 
Memories)” (2:43) [Vidor BMI-Walker] 


CARL BELEW (RCA Victor 9446) 

Mary’s Little Lamb (2:12) [4 Star Sales BMI-Belew] 

Carl Belew makes a definite bid to regain some of his former chart stature 
as a result of this Victor newie called “Mary’s Little Lamb.” Deejays should 
find this sweet romance a tasty bit of programming material. Flip: “Once” 
(2:19) [Harbot SESAC-Harris] 




Cash Box — February 10, 1968 



Aummam! 


DECCA Rtcords it a Divitien of MCA, Inc. 


Direction: Smiley Wilson, Wil-Helm Agency 801 16th Ave., South Nashville, Tennessee 
Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


63 



CnghBaac Country Roundup 




Then there’s the oft-told tale of 
the radio station that gets poor serv- 
ice from the record label. An S.O.S. 
message comes from Apache Wells, 
New Mexico, stating that a 10,000- 
watt station is being overlooked in the 
mailings of at least six big labels. The 
next daj' a similar notice comes from 
a 1,000-watt outlet in Northern Utah, 
followed immediately by another re- 
quest from somewhere in Maine. 

A quick look at the mailing lists 
at a great many labels would prob- 
ably make one wonder how a hit rec- 
ord can possibly come into being. 
Sometimes they happen despite the 
labels. 

But the fact remains that the outlying 
stations in secondary markets are 
overlooked too often in both direct 
mailings and in servicing from dis- 
tributors. 

In order to help alleviate the situa- 
tion somewhat. Cash Box would like 
to here from those stations which re- 
ceive either poor servive or no serv- 
ice at all, and a list of the labels who 
are responsible for poor servicing. A 
line can be dropped to the Country 
Editor, Cash Box Magazine 1780 
Broadway, N.Y. 10019. 

* * * 

Nashville booker Bob Neal has set 
up two more star-spangled country 
packages for the DuQuoin, 111. State 
Fair on Aug. 24 & 25, marking the 
fifth year in a row that Neal has 
packaged talent for the fair. Opening 
night will feature the Buck Owens 
Show, with added attractions Red 
Foley, Lynn Anderson and the Home- 
steaders, while the next day’s festivi- 
ties boasts a lineup that includes Son- 
ny James & his Southern Gentlemen, 
Hank Snow & the Rainbow Ranch 
Boys, Connie Smith & her Sundowners, 
Tex Ritter & the Boll Weevils and the 
Homesteaders. Arrangements for the 
two all-star groups were finalized by 
Neal and William H. Hayes II, presi- 
dent of the fair. 

^ ^ ^ 

Epic’s Jimmy Payne takes off on a 
10-week tour of the Orient, for the 
USO, beginning Feb. 14, with stops 
scheduled in Hawaii, the Philippines, 
Taiwan, Japan and Okinawa. Payne, 
who’s currently making some nice 
noise with “Where Has All The Love 
Gone,” will be accompanied by Ron & 
Leona Williams, in addition to his 
backup group. 

At the risk of being responsible for 
mass heartbreak and hysteria, we’ll 
take a moment to congratulate Glenn 
Sutton upon the announcement of his 
engagement to lovely Lynn Anderson. 
The heartbreak, naturally, will be gen- 
erated by the loss of the fair Miss An- 
derson, and the hysterics go out to the 
unfair Sutton. The wedding has been 
set for May 4 in Hendersonville. . . . 
P.S. Lynn and mama Liz have just re- 
leased their first duet single, “Mother, 
May I?” on Victor (Lynn appears 
courtesy of Chart Records). Interest- 
ing to note that the session features 
two great steel men, Pete Drake and 
Lloyd Green, since Liz nevers cuts 
without Pete and Lynn never records 
without Lloyd. 


Hank Williams, Jr. & his Cheating 
Hearts have taken off on a cross-coun- 
try tour which will run until Mar. 24, 
and will feature, as part of the part 
of the package. Hank Williams’ former 
band, the Drifting Cowboys (Don 
Helms, Sammy Pruitt, Jerry Rivers 
and Hillous Buttrum), Wilma Lee & 
Stoney Cooper, Lean Ashley, Margie 
Singleton, Lefty Frizzell, Merle Kil- 
gore and Jean Shepard. 

^ ^ 

Country Johnny Mathis has returned 
to the country music business on a 
full-time basis, after a ten year hiatus 
from the scene wherein his only musi- 
cal activities came in the form of 
gospel tunes. Having recorded gospel 
material with Little Darlin’ Records 
for the past two years, Johnny is 
ready, once again, to record country 
product. 

* * * 

Bobby Lord and Ray Pillow, along 
with WPLO-Atlanta’s Bobby Johnson 
& the Western Gentlemen, were chosen 
to represent the world of Country 
Music during the recent annual meet- 
ing of the Georgia Fair Association. 
. . . Kathy Dee, just back from a gig at 
the naval base in Halifax with the 
Jimmy Stone Band, already has the 
bags packed for more morale-boosting 
work. This time it’ll be at a string 
of Alaskan air bases. . . . Tennessee 
Ernie Ford has just knocked off a new 
Capitol LP and is preparing to take 
off for the Carousel in West Covina 
later this month. . . . Hickory Records 
has signed singer Johnny Williams to 
a long-term recording contract. His 
first single, “Lock The Door Between 
Us,” has just been released. . . . K-Ark 
Records reports an error on the label 
copy of Ronie Barth’s new release. 
Copy, which titles the record ‘I’ll Wait 
’Til Tomorrow,” should read “I’ll Wait 
For Tomorrow.” . . . The brand new 
Northland label has signed Rusty 
Dunn to a recording pact, with the 
artist’s first release, “Production 
Line,” now available. Dee jays may ob- 
tain copies by writing Northland Rec- 
ords, c/o Jessie Barkel, P.O. Box 507, 
Holland, Mich. 49423. 

^ 

A group of avid country fans sta- 
tioned overseas with our Seabee de- 
tachment at Chu Lai, South Viet Nam 
has written us regarding their situa- 
tion over there as far as country music 
is concerned. Seems records are aw- 
fully hard to come by, and the boys get 
by on what their friends or relatives 
might send — which is not a great deal. 
Imaginative labels and indie promoters 
might find a few extra copies laying 
around to send over the foam to these 
cats. It would do wonders for morale. 
For those interested, the group is 
headed up by Don Castle, Don Vaughn 
and Robert Thompson, whose address 
is: U.S. Navy Construction Batt. For- 
ty, Company H, 5 Fleet Post Office, 
New York 09501. . . . Speaking of mo- 
rale, these same fellows would like to 
correspond with female members of 
the country music audience, so if there 
are any gals out there who have some 
time on their hands, start writing! 



Just Visiting 

The C&W Family An- 
derson, well represented in 
the music business with 
Papa Bear Casey (center), 
Mama Bear Liz (second 
from right) and Baby Bear 
Lynn (second from left), 
drop in for a visit with the 
boys at the KBBQ Ranch 
to see how the gals’ re- 
spective disks are doing 
air-wise. Greeting the clan 
in the photo are Bob Jack- 
son Oeft) and station mu- 
sic director Larry Scott. 


/7y/T\\Tv //// \\\\ 

• nn I W v\ nli \\\\ flnW \\\ 

ttit \ WWrft I I \ TT\/// M 1 U\ 

toshBiw Country Reviews 


! 


Picks oi the Week 




MARGIE SINGLETON (Ashley 2050) 

Wandering Mind (2:20) [Gallico BMI-Singleton, Ashley, Kilgore] 

It may be the right time for Margie Singleton to break back sharply into 
the big picture as she offers a potent thumper called “Wandering Mind.” 
Deck has a strong pop-country flavor that may result in lots of uptown spins. 
Flip: “Your Conscience Sends Me Flowers” (2:45) [Ashmar BMI-Ashley, 
Singleton] 


HOMESTEADERS (Little Darlin’ 0036) 

Making Believe (2:20) [Acuff-Rose BM 1-Reed, Work, Hobson] 

The Homesteaders have consistently stirred up good noise, and the group 
may finally break out big with this effort titled, “Making Believe.” Boys 
change the tempo from their usual romping sound for this effective ballad 
outing, which they handle real well. Flip: “Lovin’ time” (1:50) [Mayhew BMi- 
Rivers] 


GOSDIN BROS. (Bakersfield Int’l 1006) 

She Still Wishes I Were You (2:46) [Garpax, Alanbo BMI-Nuckles, Mize] 

The Gosdin Bros, helped put the Bakersfield International label on the 
map with “Hangin’ On” and could add a little further topography with “She 
Still Wishes I Were You.” Boys offer a pretty job on this woes-filled ballad. 
Flip: “There Must Be A Someone (I Can Turn To)” (2:39) [Tickner BMI-V./R. 
Gosdin] 


Best Bets 





DAVID ROGERS (Columbia 44430) 
I’d Be Your Fool Again (2:29) [Win- 
dow BMI-Lewallen, Rogers] A feeling- 
ful woeser in the hands of David 
Rogers may be the right combination 
to bring this deck on home. Side may 
see lots of spins. Flip: “Loser’s Shoes” 
(2:11) [Starday, Window BMI- King- 
ston] 


BILLY GOLDEN (, Starday 827) 

A Loser Makin’ Good (2:45) [Tarheel 
BMI-Milete] The pleasant sound of 
this blues-filled item could mean big 
things for Billy Golden. Songster and 
material have a good shot at getting 
action. Flip: “Life’s Little Pleasures” 
(2:08) [Country Four, Tarheel BMI- 
Golden] 


BRUCE CHANNEL (Charay 33) 

The Times (2:29) [LeBill BMI-Hau- 
sey] Here’s an attractive pop-country 
session that could stir up some noise in 
both markets. A real pretty ballad 
gets nice treatment here from the 
songster. Flip: “Baby Heartbreak” 

(2:03) [Channel, Cobb Montgomery] 


DON WAYNE (Mercury 72773) 

Cut Me Loose (2:23) [Tree BMI- 
Wayne] Don Wayne’s handling of this 
down-hearted woeser may result in a 
lot of sales activity for the deck. The 
attractive ballad merits a second 
listen by deejays. Flip: “Finishing 
School” (2:20) [Tree-Wayne] 


NORMA LEE (Capitol 2098) 

If That’s The Fashion (2:59) [Central 
Songs BMI-Collins] Here’s a tear- 
tugging ballad session that could 
establish Norma Lee on a national 
basis. Songstress does a nice job with 
her interpretation. Flip: “My Kinda 
Lovin’ ” (1:49) [Central Songs BMI- 
Ball, Bryant] 

i 

TONY DOUGLAS (Paula 290) I 

I’m A One Woman Man (1:15) [Cedar- ^ 
wood BMI-Franks, Horton] Look for 
Tony Douglas to stir up interest as a 
result of this lid. Lively, rollicking ^ >' 
workout could build up a good head of j 
steam. Flip: “Mention My Name” 

(2:30) [Su-Ma BMI-Jennings, Doug- . * 
las] ’’ 



JOHNNY WILLIAMS (Hickory 1491) 
Lock The Door Between Us (2:26) 
[Cedanwood BMI-Walker, Crutch- 
field] A strong ballad and a heartfelt 
interpretation by Johnny Williams 
might add up to lots of chart points 
and consumer sales. Worth a listen. 
Flip: “Tempted” (2:05) [Acuff-Rose 
BMUNewberry] 


A 


BOBBY EDWARDS (Chart 1020) 

I’m Sorry To See Me Go (2:30) 
[Greenback, Yonah BMI-Anderson] 
Could be plenty of action in store for 
this Bobby Edwards effort. Songster 
offers a mid-tempo weeper that has a 
chance to catch on. Flip: “Once A 
Fool (Always A Fool)” (2:08) [Yonah 
BMI-Moncrief, Sharp] 



BILLY EARL (Hilltop 3017) 

I’ll Oilwells Love You (2:10) [Com- 
bine BMI-Owens, Parton] A cute, 
fanciful novelty side in the hands of 
Billy Earl, this easy-going stanza may 
have what it takes. A fun change of 
pace. Flip: “I Hope I Don’t Find Her 
The Way I Left Her” (2:25) [South- 
town BMI-Owens] 


LINDY LEIGH (Avenue South 502) ^ 

You Can’t Afford Me On Your Mind 
(2:32) [Regent BMI-Null] Lindy 
Leigh offers a catchy ditty which may '■'*/ 
see her rack up a good deal of re- I 
sponse. Deejays and consumers may 
take a liking to it. Flip: “Back Where \ 
My Bread Come From” (2:25) [River- 
boat BMI-King] I 

Cash Box — February 10, 1968 M 


64 




February 10, 1968 



The Groop, one of Australia's top vocal/ instrumental outfits, records for CBS and recently had a strong national hit with "Woman You're Breaking Me". They recently won Australia's 
biggest talent event of the year. The National Battle of the Sounds conducted by Radio 3UZ. This gave them a $1000 cash prize and a four-week expenses paid trip to England. They 
arrive in the U.K. in Feb. for a round of radio and TV dates. 




Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


65 




Les TROPHEES MIDEAA 1968 

THE MIDEM TROPHY WINNERS (NATIONAL) 


Country 

Artistes 

Record Company 

Autriche 

Udo Jurgens 

Montana 

Afrique du Sud 

Group 2 

E.M.I. 

Allemagne 

Freddy Quinn 
Wencke Myhre 

DGG 

DGG 

Australie 

Herb Alpert and 
the Tijuana Brass 

Festival Records 

Bresil 

Roberto Carlos 

C. B. S. 

Belgique 

Adamo 
Will Tura 

Grammophone 

Palette 

Canada 

Gordon Lightfoot 
Catherine Me Kinnon 
Abbey Tavern Singers 
Johnny Farago 
Les Sultans 
Michele Richard 

Compo 
Arc Sound 
Arc Sound 
Canusa 
D. S. P. 

Trans Canada 

Chili 

Jose Alfredo Fuentes 

Odeon 

Colombie 

Alci Acosta 

Codiscos 

Danemark 

Keld and the Monkeys 

E. M. I. 

Espagne 

Raphael 

Hispavox S.A. 

Finlande 

Danny 

Scandia Musikkii 

France 

Mireille Mathieu 
Adamo 

Barclay 

Pathe-Marconi 

Grande-Bretagne 

The Beatles 
Tom Jones 
Petula Clark 

E.M.I. 

Decca Records 
Vogue 


MIDEM’s Grand Gaia 


As far as Galas were concerned the 
climax of the week came on Saturday, 
Jan. 27, the last night of MIDEM, 
when Bernard Chevry presented The 
Grand Gala of the Trophies at the 
Palais des Festivals. Trophies both 
National and International were 
awarded to artists, male and female, 
orchestra groups, etc. with the biggest 
sales in their own countries. 

The program was broadcast and 
televised in color in five countries of 
Intervision and nine countries of Euro- 
vision. 

Not all the award winners were able 
to come to Cannes for the perform- 
ance but the following appeared with 
success. The Visir Male Choir (Ice- 
land), Danny (Finland), The Groep 2 
(S. Africa), The Vanguards (Norway), 
Czeslan Niemen (Poland), Keld & the 
Donkeys (Denmark), The Hep Stars 
(Sweden), Shuli Natan (Israel), 
Laszlo Aradszky (Hungary), The 
Pokes (British Group now living in 
Italy), Will Tura (Belgium), Vice 
Vukov, from Yugoslavia, who repre- 
sented his country at last year’s Euro- 
vision Song Contest. Gert Timmerman, 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiii iii iii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu^^^^ 


Charming Brazilian songstress Eliss 
Regina, was considered one of the 
great sensations of MIDEM. Her ap- 
pearance, during the first international 
gala, was a tremendous success. A few 
hours later she was engaged for three 
weeks at the Olympia of Paris in 
March and in April on Enrico Macias’ 
program. Eliss is a big Bossa Nova 
songstress. 


O/ Trophies 


the Dutch artist with 11 Gold awards 
to his credit and making his second 
appearance at MIDEM, Caterina Ca- 
selli (Italy), Karel Gott (Czechoslo- 
vakia), Roberto Carlos (Brazil), Udo 
Jurgens (Austria and the Eurovision -i 
Song contest winner of 1966). Raphael 
(Spain), Wencke Myhre (Germany), 
Tom Jones (Britain), Adamo (France 
and Belgium). f 


The French star Mireille Mathieu 
was scheduled to appear but was un- 
able to make it due to travel problems. 
The same happened to Petula Clark. 

She was all set and waiting to fly to V 
Nice but snow at Geneva prevented | 
the plane from taking off. The first ■' 
big show stopper was Karel Gott, who 1, 
was called back for three curtain calls. 
Udo Jurgens was as popular as ever 
and Raphael received a tumultuous 
ovation. Adamo who carried off the 
MIDEM trophies for the highest sales 
in France and Belgium for the second y 
year had a rapturous reception. * 

However, it was the British singer 
Tom Jones who had the biggest suc-fl^, 
cess of the evening, and vindicated ' 
completely the disappointment which ^ 
pervaded the British gala earlier in 
the week. Tom restored Britain’s repu- y 
tation and put his country right back 
at the top of the tree. Recently voted 
the No. 1 Male Singer on both sides *| 
of the Atlantic this was his last ap- H 
pearance before leaving for America ftj, 
for an extended tour. After brilliantly ■*! 
performing his ever popular “Green ; 
Green Grass of Home” he topped off ' 
his stint with his current British 
smash “I’m Coming Home” which won 
him a standing ovation. U' 


Hongrie 

Islande 

Israel 

Italic 


Laszlo Aradszky 
The Visir Male Choir 
Shuli Natan 


Caterina Caselli 
The Rokes 
Gianni Morandi 


Mexique 
Norvege 
Portugal 
Pays-Bas 
Pologne 
Republique Arabe Unie 
Suede 
Tchecoslovaquie 
U.S.A. 


Javier Solis 
The Vanguards 
Amalia Rodrigues 
Gert Timmerman 
Czeslaw Niemen 
Oum Kalsoum 
The Hep Stars 
Karel Gott 


Herb Alpert and the 
Tijuana Bras 
Frank Sinatra 
Nancy Sinatra 
The Monkees 


U.S.S.R. 


Yougoslavie 


Vice Vukov 


INTERNATIONAL 


The Beatles 
Herb Alpert 
Petula Clark 


Qualiton 
Falkinn Ltd. 
Hed Arzi 


C.G.D. 

R.C.A. 

R.C.A. 


C.B.S. 

Valentim de Carvalho 
Valentim de Carvalho 
C.N.R. 

Polskie Nagrania 
Sono Cairo 
Cupol 
Supraphon 
A&M Records 


Reprise 

Reprise 

R.C.A./ Victor/ Colgems 


Dmytro Hnatyuk 
Ludmilla Zykina 
Droujba 

L’ensemble de I’Armee 
Sovietique sous la direc- 
tion de A. Alexandrov 


Melodia 

Melodia 

Melodia 


Melodia 

Jugoton 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiuiiiiyiiiMiyiM 


MIDEM: General Survey 


(Continued from page 7) 


was magnificent and MIDEM has es- 
tablished itself as an unique Music 
Market for the world. 


It would be impossible to name the 
list of top recording and publishing 
personalities who gathered in Cannes 
for MIDEM from all corners of the 
world. Better by far to say that any- 
one who is anyone in the music busi- 
ness today was there. The five floors 
of the Martinez were buzzing all week 
with rumors of deals being set and 
clinched. A glance at the program of 
exhibitors (complex until the country 
by country format became familiar) 
sent people scuttling up and down the 
stairs (sometimes quicker than using 
the small and inadequate elevators, to 
find the offices of the various people 
they wished to visit. 


Atop the entrance to each suite an 
illuminated flash panel provided the 
clue to the occupants. Outside the of- 
fices the walls of the corridors were 
handsomely decorated with display 
panels promoting the products avail- 
able. In addition to the basic partici- 
pation fees many companies had spent 
a fortune on magnificent ‘shop win- 
dows’ in an effort to out-do and event- 
ually outsell their competitors. Most 
of the offices boasted a well stocked 
bar and once inside, the weary visitor 
was plied with a wide variety of re- 
freshments ... a welcome break in 
the constant and exhausting round of 










PI Wk 




% 0 -. 


GLOBAL EMI: 

MIDEM was 
the scene 
of o 

rare grouping 
of EMI execs 
the world over 


meeting old friends and establishing 
new contacts. 




U.S. Execs Comment 
Many more American companies 
participated this year than last. RCA 
had a large suite of offices on the Y * 
fourth ffoor. Dario Soria flew in from 
the States and told the Cash Box that k 
“. . . as far as publishing is concerned ' 
MIDEM is a good market for both 
large and small companies. He feels 
that for the music publisher MIDEM 
is as important as the Frankfurt Fair^^. 
is to the Book publisher. Record-wise, 
MIDEM is more important for the 
small independent with no internation- f 
al distribution for their product, than.., 1 
for the majors with worldwide tie-ups. i 
Soria also noted that MIDEM provided i 
an excellent opportunity for Eastern * 
countries to get the “feel” of the 
western market. He woulld like to see.-, 
some re-thinking concerning the par- 
ticipation and exposure of artists. - 
The first step has already been taken 
in this direction by inviting agents^ 
managers and bookers to this year’s 
meet. This should result in MIDEM 
becoming a showcase for the intro- 
duction of new talent. Soria is not in 
favor of the introduction of classical.^ 
artists into what is primarily a pop 
Festival. ' 


Elektra 


Larry Harris, vp of Elektra Records 
of America also criticized the presen- 
tation of the Galas. On the other hand 
he found that a week at MIDEM saved 
him weeks of travelling around th^ ; 
world and Europe in particular. Oni|f 
balance he found his visit well worth ^ 
while and considers that with a few 
organizational changes MIDEM 196^ 
will be first rate. 


MGM 

MGM’s worldwide organization was 
represented and headed up by inter- 
national director Eric Steinmetz and 
Rex Oldfield from the London office. 
MGM’s European representative John.;^ 

Nathan was also present. J < 

Summing up Oldfield said that 
MIDEM was invaluable from the per- 
sonal contact point of view and sales- ' 
wise many new British produced disks 
were placed with European companies. 

A & M ^ 

David Hubert & Gil Freisen of A & M .w 

Records also found MIDEM interesting 
and invaluable. Again they too, would 
(Continued on page 67) 


i 


66 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 




FRANCE 

French producers and publishers 
! very various opinions about MIDEM. 
I Several were a little disappointed, 
I telling it was more difficult to make 
deals than last year, but most were 
very satisfied. 

The greatest sensation for French 
Trade was the fantastic success in 
the States of Paul Mauriat’s “Love 
is blue”. This song, which had been 
presented one year ago at the Euro- 
^ vision song contest by Luxemburg, 
i is going to be recorded by Bing 
Crosby, A1 Martino, Johnny Mathis 
(CBS), Klaus Ogerman (Mercury), 
^ Charlie Byrd (CBS). 35.000 sheet 
music have been already sold in the 
States. This created at MIDEM an 
enthusiastic rush of foreign pub- 
; lishers to buy the different songs 
! writen by composer Andre Popp and 
I Author Pierre Cour. This is not the 
only reason which made Jean Pierard, 
Tutti manager, a really happy pub- 
lisher. He signed a contract with Mr. 
and Mrs. Beltram for producing in 
France German top star Roy Black. 
In exchange Mr. and Mrs. Beltram 
\, will produce in Germany French artist 
Tony Mark. Pierard also took the 
opportunity of MIDEM to present the 
new Johnny Hallyday recording with 
French treatment of the Mitch Mur- 
ray’s “Ballard of Bonnie and Clyde.” 

French Prexy of Philips records 
Georges Meyerstein-Maigret presented 
the “Cassettophone” a portable player 
1 for Musicassettes. The Cassettophone 
will be launched in April on both 
French and American markets. Other 
'■ European countries will be prospected 
r at the beginning of Autumn. Meyer- 
stein also announced that eleven 
Japanese firms will manufacture tape 
players to be used with Philips style 
cartridges. 

' The Nicole Croisille success on the 
opening night is also a great success 
for Norbert Saada, who manages “La 
Compagnie,” which is one of the most 
* dynamic young independent produc- 
tion companies. For his first year at 
MIDEM, “La Compagnie” was not 
created last year, Saada took two 
rooms which were among the most 
crowded. He announced he wants to 
copy the Tamla/Motown and Stax 
■ production style. He has just taken 
under contract several musicians for 
creating a new French sound. 

Rolf Marbot (SEMI-Meridian) took 
r the opportunity of the MIDEM to 
present the new Michel Polnareff’s 
EP. He is delighted because “Cent 
Fois Ma Vie,” a song written by 
^ Hubert Giraud and Jean Broussoile 
has been bought for United States by 
' Hill & Range. Another Meridian orig- 
inal copyright, “II Est Mort Le Soleil,” 

I y will soon be recorded by Ray Charles. 

1 Business has also been excellent for 
I Bleu Blanc Rouge, the publishing 
: company managed by Jean Kluger. 
i On the first day of MIDEM he sold 
^ his song “Aide Toi Le Ciel T’Aidera”, 

I for Germany (Vogue), Italy (Dii- 
l rium), Scandinavia (Sonet). In France 
! that song has been recorded by Petula 
|i*‘Clark for immediate release. 

French manager, Pilippe Boutet, of 
April Music, booked months before 
the only room with a terrace. So ]t 
was in a permanent party mood that 
» Sol Rabinowitz, who supervises April 
Music International, David Rosner 
(USA), Neil Anderson (USA), Bar- 
I bara Hayes (GB), Mr. Portengen 
i^( Holland), Rudolf Kreuzer (Ger- 
^ many), Somalfico (Italy) and Boutet 
I were welcoming artists and jour- 
nalists. 

, Kenya born artist Roger Whittaker 
came to the MIDEM to be featured 
, in the English Gala and to meet 
Andre Chagneau and Roger Marouani 
'I'of Festival which distributes in France 
Impact Records. Whittaker was de- 
lighted with the success in France 
of “If I Were A Rich Man.” 

^ Rolf Marbot was delighted for 
having sold the 40 year old song “Les 
Roses Blanches” to A1 Gallico for 
United States. After the success of 
^he new version of that song by the 


Sunlights, sub-publishing rights have 
been also sold in England, Spain and 
Italy. Pierre Cour and Andre Popp, 
the author and composer of “Love is 
blue” signed an exclusive contract for 
three years with Roger Marouani who 
manages Igloo publishing. Leon Cabat, 
Vogue Prexy, was particularly happy 
to be able to talk with Vogue people 
in Belgium, Switzerland, Germany 
and with associated companies from 
England, Italy and United States. He 
took opportunity of MIDEM for or- 
ganizing a Vogue society in Italy. He 
also did a big deal for the use of 
Vogues tape cartridges in the States. 

Henri Marchal of Sunny Music was 
delighted with the success of Henri 
Des song “Bla Bla Blou”. He sold it 
for England (Pan Music), USA (Rod 
McKuen), Scandinavia (Poly dor) and 
Germany (Cornet Music). Coco Bria- 
val, young guitarist produced by 
Sunny Music will soon release an LP 
album in Italy, Great Britain, Scan- 
dinavia and Germany. 

Danyel Gerard, who manages his 
own “Danny Music” publishing com- 
pany, made a $1,000 dollars deal with 
Regent Music Corp. for exploitation 
in United States, Canada, British, 
Commonwealth and Austral-Asia, of 
the Danyel Gerard and Vline Buggy’s 
song “Helas trois fois Helas”. Danyel 
Gerard also presented the music he 
wrote for new motion picture “Les 
Poneyttes.” 

Harry Goodman who visited Jean 
Max Riviere and Gerard Bourgeois 
“Tilt Music” managers took the right 
of Michel Delpech and Roland Vin- 
cent’s song “H faut regarder les 
Etoiles”. Goodman signed the contract 
for a Ray Coniff recording of that 
song before three months. 

Philippe Seiller and Rene Desmarty 
of Paul Beuscher publishing were 
delighted with the success of the new 
Frangois Deguelt’s “La Rencontre”. 
Two days after the beginning of 
MIDEM seven countries already 
bought the song. Good reactions too 
for young composer Jean Pierre Le- 
brot songs. Nino Ferrer who is an 
important star in France is going 
to record soon his first English record. 
Philippe Seiller and Desmarty were 
also studying contacts for the exploi- 
tation of their excellent classical 
music catalog. 

Pathe Marconi which is the French 
department of EMI was strongly re- 
presented at MIDEM. At this occa- 
sion we heard the nomination of 
Frangois Minchin as new President 
of the Syndicat National de I’Industrie 
et de Commerce Phonographique. 

SPAIN 

Most Spanish companies were repre- 
sented at the 1968 MIDEM in Cannes. 
Some of the publishers, however, were 
there as observers and visitors. 

Luis Calvo from HISPAVOX said 
about this record gathering that 
“thanks to the MIDEM we have been 
able to export quite a lot of our rec- 
ords to countries in which we never 
had previous contacts. And again, here 
we have signed some contracts to re- 
lease all records of Maria Osriz in the 
United States through United Art’sts 
which is probably our biggest affair 
in Cannes. We can only say that we 
are glad to have come this year . . .” 

Antonio Martinez, of MARFER, has 
said: “The MIDEM is definitely some- 
thing we the record companies were 
needing for a long time. This year, 
besides other big business I have been 
able to sign again contract with 
NUSIDISC and other companies we 
were representing up to now. I am 
happy . . .” 

Ramon Segura, A & M in DISCOlS 
VERGARA told the Cash Box: 
“Among other big deals, this year we 
have “sold” Peret y Bus Gitanos to 
USA, Great Britain (Page One Rec- 
ords), France (Festival), Italy (Duri- 
um), Germany (Ariola), Canada etc. 
Of co'urse we will be here next year. 

I only hope the next one to be just 
like tihis one . . .” 

Alfredo Garcia Segura from Musica 
(Continued on page 69) 


GERMANY 

Meet us at MIDEM was the motto 
of the big week of the world record 
industry and that’s just what every- 
body in Germany did. Officially repre- 
sented were Aberbach Music, Edition 
Accord, April Music, Ariola — Euro- 
disc Records, Bellaphon Records, C. 
Bertelsmann Publishing, Capriccio 
Music, Chappell /iSeith Music, Coronet 
Records, Deutsche Grammophon Ges- 
ellschaft, Deutsche Saga Records, 
Deutsche Vogue Records, Electrola 
Records, Francis Day and Hunter, 
Melodie Der Welt Hansa Records, In- 
tro Publishing, Hans Gerig Music, 
Hans Sikorski Music, Metronome Rec- 
ords, Edition Montana, Peer Music, 
Rolf Budde Music, Quint Music, Ralph 
Maria Siegel Music, Rudolf iSlezak 
Music, Global/Music, Alfred Schacht 
Publishing Companies, Stigwood-Yas- 
kiel International, Supertone Records, 
Telefunken-Decca (Teldec) Records, 
Ufaton Music, Walt Disney Music, 
Werner Steffen Music and West-Ton 
Music. 

Many Deals Worked Out 

In the exciting week of the biggest 
barter fair in the history of the mu- 
sic business sleep was a forgotten 
word. Everyone was seeing everyone. 
As young publisher-Avriter-producer 
Ralph Siegel Jr. put it, “It’s better 
than 50 Brill Buildings.” Ralph, his 
record distributor Electrola and the 
EMI publishing house Edition Accord 
were able to place a new LP by The 
Gloomys in every major market in the 


world during this one week. 

Let’s just talk about some of the 
reactions of people in the music busi- 
ness in Germany to the Midem week 
and the work that was done. The 
young Coronet Records was repre- 
sented by toppers Gunther Ilgner and 
Heinz Gietz as well as director Her- 
bert Falk. Through the festival they 
were able to place their line in Terri- 
tories all over the world and also were 
able to do a great number of indi- 
vidual master deals, buying as well as 
selling. 

Peter Meisel of Hansa Records and 
Intro Music signed contracts with sev- 
eral foreign artists for the label and 
was also able to pick up several 
masters. He also meets with his con- 
tacts from all over the world. 

Electrola Records signed Belgium’s 
top star Marc Aryan and instrumental 
star Roland Thyssen to contracts and 
also set up several artists for the Split 
Yugoslavia festival. The firm was also 
able to meet with EMI partners and 
publishers from all over. Zivanovic, 
owner of Bellaphon Records, said that 
he was able to place several records 
as well as pick up masters for his com- 
pany. Rudy Retry of Edition Accord 
swung along by signing the material 
from (Spain from important artist 
Raphael as well as several interesting 
Portuguese copyrights. The ever ac- 
tive Larry Yaskiel with associate 
Peter Knight Jr. was hard at work 
meeting with all of the international 
firms that he promotes for in Ger- 
many. He was able to sign several 
(Continued on page 69) 


MIDEM: General Survey (continued from page 66> 


like to see an improvement in the stan- 
dard of the Galas. MIDEM enables 
companies such as A & M to structure 
their thinking and planning on a Euro- 
pean scale rather than treating each 
country as an isolated market. For 
Mercury Records, Lou Reizner, direc- 
tor of overseas operations, said that 
from a contact point of view MIDEM 
had been excellent. On the other hand, 
he said there were far too many people 
to see in so short a time. He also 
felt that although MIDEM was a valu- 
able springboard for setting up a deal 
it was impossible to finalize an agree- 
ment on the spot. 

Liberty 

A1 Bennett, president of Liberty 
Records, praised the organizers for 
creating a valuable meeting place for 
record men from all over the world. 
His views were echoed by Bob Reis- 
dorf, topper of Liberty’s London of- 
fice and Ron Kass the labels Interna- 
tional chief. 

Bell 

Larry Uttal of Bell Records was able 
to meet many European representa- 
tives and finalize many deals. One of 
the most important being an exclusive 
distribution deal in the U.S. for all 
Dick James future recording interests 
(see last week’s issue). 

Ed Chalpin, president of PPX found 
MIDEM an ideal travel saver. He sold 
a number of LPs to Ri-Fi of Italy and 
clinched an Indie production deal with 
Deutsche Vogue of Germany, a terri- 
tory where he plans to set up a new 
office in Berlin. 

CBS 

CBS was well represented by the 
French company. Top Brass included 
Jacques Souplet, and Sol Rabinowitz, 
Jacques Plait, Christian Deffes and 
Ken Glancey from the London office 
flew in. Many new catalog deals were 
completed for April Music and some 
of the labels top talent appeared at 
MIDEM including Georgie Fame, Les 
Compagnons de le Chanson, Roberto 
Carlos etc. 

EMI 

As far as Britain was concerned the 
largest representation came from 
EMI and their publishing company 
Ardmore and Beechwood. Summing 
up for the organization Ron White, 
the general manager, marketing, said 
that even by the end of the MIDEM 
week it would be too early to assess 


the final value of the convention. Cer- 
tainly it helped EMI to renew contacts 
and to meet new people which it is 
hoped will result in additional busi- 
ness in the future. Altogether over 30 
representatives of EMI and their li- 
censees were present. 

Louis Benjamin, managing director 
of Pye Records, was impressed mainly 
by the opportunity presented by 
MIDEM for meeting and contacting 
pepole. He found the socializing side 
of the convention very rewarding. 
However he maintained that although 
new deals can be started at MIDEM 
it is necessary to clinch them at the 
home base and in the country of one 
or other of the interested parties. A 
view shared by many of this year’s 
participants. 

Larry Page of Page One Records 
really went to town publicity-wise. 
5,000 leaflets and posters flooded the 
market and Page One executives sport- 
ed scarlet and white Page One Tee 
shirts. 

Many deals were completed, includ- 
ing one with Bell Records of America 
to release Page One product there on 
its own label, effective immediately, 
with the release of the current U.K. 
charter “Everything I Am” by Plastic 
Penny. Also picked up a film sound- 
track and on the publishing side ac- 
quired a number of copyrights for 
Dick James Music. 

British Publishers Comment 

As far as British publishers were 
concerned MIDEM 1968 was summed 
up by Archie Montgomrey of the Mu- 
sic Publishers Association. “On every 
hand the reaction seems to have been 
favorable and in certain quarters has 
been described as fabulous. The view 
seems to be unanimously held that 
MIDEM affords an opportunity for 
making contacts which would normal- 
ly be impossible because of the travel 
involved. Members of the MPA are 
meeting opposite numbers from all 
countries who were previously only 
names. One small publishing company 
netted almost $4,000 in respect of his 
copyrights and in advance of antici- 
pated royalties. This would not have 
been possible but for MIDEM. And 
but for the subsidy from the Board 
of Trade. 

Others Praise MIDEM 
“ A Swiss publisher Michael Vifian of 
■ ((Continued on page 68) 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


67 


3 


MIDEM Galas: A Critique 



CANNES, So. France — RCA Victor hosted a cocktail party at a beautiful boat- 
house in Cannes at MIDEM. The cameraman caught some of the action above. 
TOP LEFT — Dario Soria (RCA, USA), Bernard Chevry (MIDEM Organizer). 
TOP RIGHT — P. Goemaere (RCA, Belgium), Sixten Eriksson (RCA, Sweden), 

Mr. Jeanneret (RCA, France). I 

CENTER LEFT — K. Caglayan (RCA, Turkey), Louis Benjamin (Pye Records, v 
U.K.), Mrs. Gerry Oord, Geoffrey Bridge (Pye Records, U.K.), Jim Bailey 
(RCA, USA), Jack Heath (RCA, U.K.). l 

CENTER RIGHT — Dario Soria, George Albert, President & Publisher of 
Cash Box, Bernard Chevry, Marty Ostrow, Cash Box v.p., Harry Brunn, RCA. 
BOTTOM LEFT — Marty Ostrow, P. Goemaere (RCA, Belgium), J. Heath (RCA, 
London), Gerry Teifer (Sunbury Music, USA), Mrs. P. Goemaere, Peter Baum- 
berger (RCA, Overseas), George Albert. 

BOTTOM RIGHT — Ren Grevatt, Midem’s USA rep, G. Albert, Jim Baily, RCA. . 


Big 3: MIDEM Confab Of Its Own 


The first MIDEM Gala was an in- 
ternational one. This was held on the 
opening night of MIDEM, Sunday, 
January 21. The auditorium of the 
Palais des Festivals was S.R.O. The 
audience was as international as the 
progTamme of artistes presented: 
“Duo Ouro Negro (Portugal), Elis 
Regina (Brasil), Ewa Demarczick 
(Poland), Juan and Junior (Spain), 
Kisielewski and Tomaszewki (Poland), 
Los Bravos (Spain), Peret y Sus 
Gitanos (Spain), Peter Horton (Aus- 
tria), P. J. Proby (UjS.A.), Sandie 
Shaw (England), The Supremes 
(UjS.A.) Les Yper Sound (France), 
Zsuzsa Koncz (Hungary).” 

Sandie Shaw repeated her 1967 
winning song from the Eurovision 
song contest “Puppet on a String;” 
P. J. Proby also made a big impression 
on the audience as did Peter Horton; 
Juan and Junior gave a good per- 
formance, so did Los Bravos. How- 
ever, it was The Supremes who 
brought the house down; they were 
on stage for fully thirty minutes, be- 
fore the audience would let them go 
and the curtain came down on the first 
gala of the week. 

France presented the first national 
gala, not considered a gi’eat night. The 
artists presented were: “Les Compag- 
nons de la Chanson” (CBS), Michel 
Fugain (Festival) Patricia (RCA), 
Jacqueline Dulac (RCA), Antoine 
(VogueU Eric Charden (Decca), 
Manitas De Platas (CBS), les Chariots 
(Vogue), Arlette Zola (Az), John Wil- 
liams (Polydor) and Pierre Barouh 
and Nicole Croisille. Nicole was the 
biggest success of the night. iShe sang 
in English, “I Never Leave You,” 
which is the theme of a new motion 
picture “Les Jeunes Loups.” 

If the French gala was not a great 
success, a lot of people were very 
surprised and pleased by the quality 
of the Czechoslovakian Gala — Artists 
were presented by the record com- 
panies: Artia, Supraphon and Panton. 
They were Karel Gott, Helena Von- 
drackova, Vaclav Neckar, Marta Ku- 
bisova, Waldemar Matuska, Yvonne 
Prenosilova, Judita Cerovska, Hana 
Hegerova, Josef Laufer. The overall 
standard of performance was excellent 
and all the artists displayed great in- 
dividual talent which makes it dif- 
ficult to single out any one performer 
for special mention. Many were mak- 
ing their first appearance in the West. 
Although, Karel Gott has recently re- 
turned from a highly successful 
season at Las Vegas and is establish- 
ing himself as an international artist. 

After the efficient Czecholovakian 
gala the British one, which attracted 
all the participants at the Palais des 
Festivals, was a little disorganized, 
specially when it was impossible to 
find an artist to come on the stage in 
the middle of the Show. Efforts to ar- 
range a Second Gala to accommodate 
the many participants unable to get 
seats were unsuccessful. The program 
for the British Gala carried the fol- 
lowing tribute from Bernard Chevry, 
organizer of MIDEM. 


“British artists have had a great 
influence on the development of pop 
music throughout the world during the 
last five years. 

The Beatles generated a new ex- 
citement at the start of their unique 
careers and continue to lead the^ field 
in pop music composition and inter- 
pretation. 

But British music is not just the 
Beatles: 1967 Knokke Song Festival 
and the 1967 Eurovision song contest 
were both won by British artists. 

Here at MIDEM we have the op- 
portunity of hearing a variety of per- 
formers, some established and some 
up-and-coming, covering many styles, 
yet all full of the enthusiasm and love 
for their music, that has put Britain 
at the top of the International Hit 
Parade.” 

The artists presented were David 
McWilliams, iSpooky Tooth, Billie 
David, Gordon Waller, Kiki Dee, The 
Moody Blues, Lulu, Roger Whittaker, 
The Brian Auger Trinity with Julie 
Driscoll, Long John Baldry, Procul 
Harum and Georgie Fame. 

However, Britain’s high position in 
the world today was not justified. The 
presentation was sub-standard despite 
the presence in the show of several 
big names. 

It was not until The Moody Blues 
came on stage half way through the 
program that things began to liven 
up. The highlight of their perform- 
ance was “Tuesday Afternoon.” Next 
came Lulu with her American chart 
topper “To Sir With Love.” Roger 
Whittaker followed and gave a great 
performance particularly with his 
rendering of “If I were a rich man,” 
currently high in the French charts. 

The biggest show-stoppers of the 
evening were the Brian Auger Trinity 
with Julie Driscoll, who brought the 
house down with “Don’t Let Me Be 
Misunderstood.” 

The last three artists on the bill 
were Long J ohn Baldry, Procul Harum 
and Georgie Fame. All three have had 
No. 1 smash hits in Britain. Hurum 
with “A Whiter Shade Of Pale, Baldry 
with “Let The Heartaches Begin” and 
Georgie Fame who is the current 
reigning champion with “Ballad of 
Bonnie & Clyde.” D. J. Dave Cash 
(unable to speak French!) had a 
tough time ad-libbing during the many 
technical hitches which punctuated 
the evening. The overall impression 
was disastrously disappointing when 
one considers the impact that British 
talent has made around the world in 
the past few years. 

The Italian Gala was also disap- 
pointing. It was left to the last two 
artists on the bill to save the day. 
. . . Ornella Vanoni and Domenico 
Modugno. 

The other artists featured in this, 
the last National Gala of the week 
were: Nemo Remigi, Leali, Elio Gan- 
dolfi, Rocky Roberts and the Pyrahnas, 
Iva Zannichi, Sergio Endrigo, Mario 
Zellinotti, Umberto Bindi, Marisa 
Sarnia, Claudio Villa, Little Tony and 
Jimmy Fontana. 


The Big 3 publishing group (Rob- 
bins-Feist-Miller) took the opportun- 
ity of MIDEM to organize a small 
International convention. Arnold 
Maxin, executive vice president and 
general manager of the Big 3 came 
from New York with Werner Stnipp, 
international co-ordinator for the Big 
3. Foreign representatives present in 
Cannes were Alan Holmes of Robbins 
Music Corporation Ltd., London to- 
gether with Ian Ralfini from the same 
office. Spain was represented by 
Auguero of Canciones del Mundo, 
Madrid. Others included Hans Gerig 
of Germany, Giuseppe Gramitto Ricci 
of Italy, Heinz Liech of Switzerland 
and Barthe Lambertini of France. 

Also present were members of their 
associated group, Francis, Day & 
Hunter. Also present was Fred Day, 
the chairman of the Board of F.D. & 
H. He was accompanied by directors 
Eddie Day and his wife and Bert 1 


Corri. British composer Les Reed 
writer of “The Last Waltz” and man- 
ager of Donna Music, an affiliated 
company, presented his latest com- 
position, “Kiss Me Goodbye,” which 
has just been received by Petula Clark ^ 
for immediate release. During the 
week, Maxin hosted a cocktail at The ' 
Carlton Hotel attended by some se- 
lected friends and associates. Maxin v, 
told the Cash Box that he was very 
impressed with MIDEM. He said it 
afforded an opportunity to foster the 
competitive spirit and helped to keep 
publishers on their toes. As far as ■ 
actual deals were concerned Maxin 
felt it was more beneficial for the ' 
smaller publisher than the giants with 
contracts already tied up around the ^ 
world. He considered MIDEM an 
event well worth attending. If he did 
not actually attend personally next 
year, he said, he would make sure that 
1 members of his organization did. ' 


MIDEM: General Survey 


(Continued from page 67) 

Revox Music, reported that he had 
completed many contracts for sub- 
publishing around the world and two 
general catalog agreements in Canada 
(Dulau) and in Germany with Rolf 
Budde. 

Stig Anderson of Sweden Music 
Stocldiolm also had a successful week 
at the MIDEM. Several deals were 
completed including a catalog deal 
with A1 Gallico for Scandinavia. Also 
from Sweden Gunner Bergstrom of 
Sonet said that business-wise MIDEM 
1968 was a great success. However he 
would like to see some improvements 
in the organization, particularly on 
the technical side. He also feels that 
at present MIDEM is predominantly 
Latin in character and would like to 
see the convention take place in other 
parts of the world. 

There were many record and pub- 
lishing men from Holland at MIDEM. 


Some opinions are worth quoting. 

Jack Haslinghuis (Phonogram): 
“The most marvelous idea that was 
ever invented for the recording busi- 
ness.” Gerry Oord (Bovema): “Last 
year MIDEM was much more intimate 
but at the Martinez business was bet- 
ter.” H. Mildenberg (Conamus): “We 
think that MIDEM will help to pro- 
mote Dutch songs all over the world.” 
Robert Oeges (Negram) : “I am al- 
ready looking forward to next year’s 
MIDEM.” Guus Jansen (Basart): “The 
system of open stands last year was 
better. All the same I did good busi- 
ness this year but MIDEM is more 
interesting for music publishers than 
for record companies.” 

Wim Brandsteder (Inelco) : “Here’s 
to the next MIDEM. . . . just great.” 
Joop Portengen (Portengen Music) : 
“MIDEM is 100% useful. I did more 
business in a week than in months 
without MIDEM.” 



Picture taken at the cocktail party hosted by Arnold Maxin of the Big 3 at the 
Carlton Hotel, Cannes shows from left to right: — 

Maxin, Kay O’Dwyer (Peer Music), British composer and writer Les Reed and 
Bert Corri of Francis, Day & Hunter. 

Standing: — Eddie Day (D.D.H. London). Arnold Maxin, Fred Day (F.D.H. Lon- 
don). Seated: — Mrs. E. Day, Mrs. A. Maxin, Mrs. F. Day. 


<S8 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 




MCM Hosts London Tape Meet 


GERMANY ON Ml DEM (Cont. from pg. 67) 


new interesting artists and concluded 
deals for several important indie 
masters although Peter did mention 
a fact that several people voiced, and 
that was surprise at the relatively low 
number of people who were actually 
trying to place indie masters at Midem 
for international release. It was most- 
ly a place to see, meet and contact 
friends and make new acquaintances 
in this ever smaller /world of music. 
Peter Kirsten of Global Music and af- 
filiates said that he felt that MIDEM 
should have lasted 10 days instead of 
a week as he couldn’t see all of the 
people that he would have liked to. He 
did buy and sell several copyrights of 
interest. He said that material by 
Horst Jankowski, who writes for 
Peter’s publishing firm and will do the 
Eurovision song for this year is much 
in demand all over the world and he 
was able to do quite a bit of work 
with the material that he controls. He 
was also busy with his artist Peter 
Horton who will have a single released 
on Roulette in the UlSA, Barclay in 
Spain, EMI in Portugal, Fermata in 
Brazil a.nd GTA in Italy to mention a 
few. This just shows the international 
action that went on. Otto Dernier of 
Aberbach (Music was seen especially 
with other DGG publishers but really 
swinging along publishers row at the 
meeting. He also was lining up deals 
as well as making contacts. 

Nobby Varenholz and Monty Luft- 
ner of Ariola/Bertelsmann were doing 
big international business with the 
young major label turning out more 
and more valuable product for the 
world market. Claude Pascal was rep- 
resenting Capriccio Music and doing a 
fine job. Rudy Kreuzer was on hand 
for CBS’s April Music. Harry Biele- 
feldt was seen renewing old acquaint- 
ances for Chappell /Seith Music. 
Deutsch Grammophon were on hand 
full force with the German and Eng- 
lish Polydor firms joining hand in 
hand to fill the halls with hippy hap- 
penings and fine classical product for 
a wide range of outstanding product 
available through the biggest German 
owned major. The party was fabulous 
and the classical contribution ex- 
cellent. Marcel Rodd was representing 
the low priced Saga label for Ger- 
many. 

J. J. Finsterwald and the Interna- 
tional manager Mano Ulrich of 
Deutsche Vogue were busy visiting 
firms buying up masters and told us 
that they were able to line up some 
excellent product. A&R chief OflSerow- 
ski and L. Veder the managing direc- 
tor of Electrola were actively on 
hand. Wolfgang Mewes and Johann 
Michel of Melodie Der Welt and their 
many affiliates also said that Midem 
gave them the needed opportunity to 
meet with their many representatives 
and firms that they represent from all 


de Espana, publishing company said 
about the MIlDlEM before going back 
to Spain: “I have been able to place 
my catalog in nearly all countries of 
the world. I did quite well last year, 
but this one has been even better for 
me. The only thing is that here you 
have so many opportunities to work 
and make deals that afterward you 
need some days rest in a lonely beach 
away from it all . . .” 

Luis Ferrer from SAYTON; said: 
“We have made very useful contacts 
in this MIDEM. And as we are a 
young company we have been ques- 
tioned by directors from other firms 
from all the world over and I sincerely 
hope that through the year we will be 
getting the benefit from this MIDEM 
. . . I promise to come over next 
year . . 

Antonio Martinez from RCA’s pub- 
lishing dept., was very lucky at this 
MIDEM, he said: “We have bought 
some good songs for the Sanremo 
song contest and made some good 
deals specially with companies from 
USA and England. We are particu- 
larly interested in Sanremo songs and 
we got them, that’s it. Definitely the 
MIDEM is the most important gather- 
ing for record and publishers from all 


over the world. Liselotte Bornemann 
of Francis Day and Hunter spent no 
time gathering laurels for the many 
hits that she has created for the firm 
in Germany but was busy making new 
contacts and landing important copy- 
rights. Dr. Hans Gerig was seen visit- 
ing with his many associates. The pub- 
lishing house has been on top of the 
list for number of top hits for over 7 
years now and many firms were in- 
terested to meet the man that made 
the feat possible. Gunter Gayer and 
Dr. Hans Sikorski of Sikorski Music 
were also looking for tunes and artists 
and seemed to be quite happy with 
the results. The Metronome group led 
by director Leif Kraul was on hand in 
full force and really pulled the pub- 
licity gag of the meeting with their 
MIDEM fiags which were seen every- 
where. Hans R. Beierlein who is not 
only a top publisher but also handles 
the hottest international name out of 
Germany now, Udo Jurgens was mak- 
ing contacts and seeing old friends. 
Alfred Schacht said that the business 
that he was able to do at Midem paid 
his expenses (and Cannes is expen- 
sive) 1000 fold and that ain’t hay. 
Rolf Budde and Hans Bradtke were 
busy placing and buying songs and 
found Midem the perfect world mar- 
ket place. 

(Rudy Slezak and Inge Mews who 
handles the German operation were 
connecting the two worlds satis- 
factorily and making Midem history 
with swinging deals. Gunther Bor- 
chert, A&R chief of Teldec and Direc- 
tor Kurt Richter were on hand seeing 
many of the firms that they represent 
world wide at the one place that this 
is possible, Midem. Rudolf Foerster of 
Ufaton Music just couldn’t miss the 
meeting of the year. Hans Dietrich 
Weiss of Podium was gathering news, 
as was representatives of all major 
trade papers such as Just Ptach of 
Schallplatte, and top execs of Auto- 
maton Markt and Ursula /Schuegraf of 
Musikmarkt. Jacques Joseph of West- 
Ton Music was also on board. Don’t 
forget Paul (Siegel ! 

Those are just a few of the names 
and faces of the German record indus- 
try seen in action at Midem. The great 
plus of MIDEM is of course the 
chance for contacts and the fact that 
this creative industry can meet to- 
gether and exchange ideas. The big 
minus is just too many people to see 
in too little time. Perhaps lists of 
MIDEM participants should be sent 
weeks in advance to the other partici- 
pants and appointments should be 
made in advance, but who does this in 
the world of music ? It’s exciting and 
tiring but it’s a ball! More about 
MIDElM and a wrap up of the big 
event in future columns but right now, 

I just want to soak my feet. 


over the world. It pays to come 
over . . .” 

Alfonso Navas, director general of 
BELTER said about this year 
MIDElM: “We were lucky last year 
and this one as well. Now with more 
participants from more countries we 
have made quite important contacts 
which will be continued through the 
year and probably finished on the next 
MIDEM. On the next MIDEM we will 
probably be even more represented. 
We really believe in the MIDEM as 
one of the best ways to make 
deals . . 

Alain Milhaud from (Spanish BAR- 
CLAY told the Cash Box: “This 
MIDEM serves us a lot also as our 
private Barclay gathering as all our 
branches from all over the world come 
over here, and besides our personal 
business we have the opportunity of 
being together and discuss plans for 
the year. I said it before and I say it 
now. We needed a thing like this and 
fortunately we already have it. 
MIDEM is a great idea and I think it 
will be going upwards . . .” 

Esteban Garcia Morencos and Mr. 
Joaquin Merino, director and Inter- 
national Chief in ZAFIRO were both 
happy about this year’s MIDEM: 


LONDON — The first tape conference 
held in London was conducted by 
MGM Records with co-hosts ITCC and 
Ampex, and Philips of Holland as 
guests. 

The affair was attended by 140 dele- 
gates from the U.S., who won places 
on the London junket by virtue of 
their sales ability with tape this past 
year. Convivial though the convention 
was with its social shindigs, guided 
tours, shopping sprees and free sight- 
seeing time, the working session which 
was addressed by top brassers from 
MGM, Ampex, Philips and ITCC, did 
little to allay the confusion which 
abounds in the many configurations of 
tape marketing — Playtape, 4-Track, 
8-Track, open reel, cassette et al. It 
emerged that this is one horse-race 
that is far from over. Meantime, the 
major disk companies are hedging 
their bets, or backing each of the run- 
ners for fear of not being on the win- 
ner as and when it is determined. 

If this duplication of tape product 
is expensive, unwidely and generally 
unsatisfactory to all parties, the most 
encouraging fact to emerge from the 
conference was that tape merchandis- 
ing generally is a big business — and a 
growing one. Corridor talk had it that 
tape — in all configurations — last year 
accounted for between $75 and $90,- 
000,000 worth of business in the U.S. 
compared with an estimated $760,000,- 
000 turnover in the disk trade. It was 
said that even in the open reel market 
(the least “understood”, or most “mis- 
understood”, of all merchandised 
tape) sales were climbing. Delegates, 
to a man, were chirpy about their fu- 
ture and figuring on big breakthroughs 
into the home while anticipating lu- 
crative growth in the youth and auto- 
mobile markets. 

Nasatir Remarks 

Opening the speeches Mort Nasatir, 
president of MGM Records, said the 
London meet “gave the chance to Locus 
on the international aspects of tape”. 
It hinted, at least, that 1968 will be 
what Nasatir termed a “banner year 
in tape production”. Mel Price, M(IM’s 
chief tape executive, noted that all 
Metro product was available in all 
tape configurations (though not all 
through the same company). One of 
the chores this trip involved for Price 
was negotiations for the placement of 
tape catalog abroad. And although 
there is plenty of handsome coin to be 
picked up by European licensing deals. 
Price has had to weigh carefully the 
respective merits of competing sys- 
tems. It would appear at first glance 
that the cassette is the dominant fac- 
tor in Europe, but 4-Track and 8- 
Track are making inroads. One of the 
things underlined by the MGM pres- 
entation — during which Price unveiled 
his product for 1968 including new 
material from The Cowsills, Sandy 
Posey, Cal Tjader, Johnny Smith, 
Wayne Newton, Oscar Peterson, The 
Stonemans, Johnny Tillotson, Arthur 
Prysock, The Velvet Underground, 
The Righteous Brothers, Eric Burdon, 
The Lovin’ Spoonful and others — was 
the final revelation that the days are 
over when pre-recorded tape is mar- 
keted as a device to sell tape recorders. 
Testimony to the volume of business 
that can now be achieved through tape 
lay in the three awards for salesman- 
ship handed out by Price. First went 
to Dick Godlewski of Eastern Record 
Distributors, East Hartford, Connecti- 
cut; second to Dennis Laventhal, Con- 
solidated Distributors, Seattle, and 
third to Bill Burton of B & K Distrib- 
utors, Dallas. 

Ampex’s Hall 

Don Hall, general manager of Am- 
pex, also laid it down in no uncertain 
terms that tape is a growth industry. 
The open reel market, he told con- 
ferees, had expanded to the point 
where 2,000 selections were available. 


“Particularly this year we have fin- 
ished some deals which were begun 
during the previous year. On the other 
hand, we have ‘placed’ The Broncos 
and Juan Manuel Serrat, Spanish 
candidate in this year’s Eurovision 
Song Contest in many countries of the 
world. Of course, we will come next 
year.” 


There was, he said, a huge marketing 
effort behind open reel and he offered 
as some evidence of the market that 
existed the fact that 85% of those 
people who bought tape recorders used 
them as playback units. Specifically, 
the hotsellers had been showtime and 
soundtrack tapes with MGM’s “Dr. 
Zhivago” head and shoulders above 
the rest. Hall noted too, that classical 
music was making rapid headway on 
tape. Significantly, for the third 
quarter of last year, Ampex’s DGG 
classical ouptut had outsold the Verve 
product handled by Ampex. The sta- 
tistics were unusual, he admitted, but 
were indicative of the increasing 
arena for taped classical music. To 
those retailers going out of the open 
reel trade for fear of a decline in that 
section of the market in the face of 
the heftily publicized 8-track system. 
Hall urged a re-think. He saw open 
reel as a product for special market- 
ing. It is not for Top 40 material, but 
a catalog product for quality music 
and the high fidelity customer, he 
opined. While cassettes represent a 
growing market, capturing both youth 
and the car trade, the 8-Track prod- 
uct pipeline was also now full. Hall 
said. But he warned that 8-Track is 
no longer a novelty item on which 
anything can be sold. Now, if the 
recorded material is not good, then it 
won’t sell; but he refuted suggestions 
that 8-Track was dying. 

Philips On Cassette 

Garrett Guzenbeck, guest-speaking 
for Philips, discoursed on the develop- 
ment of the cassette following careful 
test marketing in Germany which suc- 
cessfully determined that Philips 
could secure a greater degree of pene- 
tration with the cartridge than with 
the open reel. Philips, in going to 
great lengths to bring about standard- 
ization in cassettes, has spurned the 
concept of a multiplicity of systems 
and the inter-industry animosity it 
brings, and has secured agreements 
with 90 manufacturers throughout the 
world for the production of cassettes 
and recorders which comply with 
Philips’ standards. Displaying a small 
sample of Philips cassette equipment, 
he revealed that a $60 playback unit 
was in the pipeline as were cassette- 
changer machines which would carry 
up to half a /dozen two-hour cart- 
ridges. Even more impressive, how- 
ever, was his prediction that 10,000,- 
000 cassettes would he sold in 1968. 
Japan he said, expects to be producing 
them soon at a rate of 600,000 a 
month. Pirn Zalsman, Philips backup 
speaker, amusingly took the pants off 
arguments against marketing a cas- 
sette player which could also be used 
for recording — ^^^arguments which stem 
from those in the industry who fear 
“pirate” taping of albums etc. He 
arrived, somehow, at a figure of 
.064% of record owners who would 
lend copies of “My Fair Lady” for 
illicit taping, but however justified his 
data may or may not have been, he 
aisle-rolled the audience and made his 
point. 

Larry Finley Award 

ITCC topper Larry Finley, who 
gifted Mort Nasatir with an award 
commemorating $500,000 of tape sales 
on “Dr. Zhivago,” later revealed that 
ITCC has grossed $3,500,000 in tape 
sales. His view was that the tape 
industry as a whole would, in 1969, 
reach a total turnover of $150,000,000. 
To make sure of his own slice of that 
kind of action, Finley said ITCC 
would be upping its promotion budget 
to $250,000 in the second quarter of 
this year. 

Who’s King? 

But for all the virtues of the pres- 
ent systems, there can be little doubt 
that the most welcome announcement 
at the first tape convention would have 
been a precise indication of which 
tape configuration would become pre- 
eminent and/or of a major company 
making a firm stand on one or other 
of them. As is freely admitted pri- 
vately, no-one yet knows which sys- 
tem will be king, thus the announce- 
ment never came and complexity 
remains. 


SPAIN ON MIDEM (Cont, from pg, 67) 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


69 


MIDEM 2: Negotiations, Conversations & Smiles 


CANNES, SO. FRANCE — The strips of photos shown below probably best 
summarizes the value of the Midem International Music Market. It was one 
big long conversation with people from other countries in an effort to learn 


how each Midem Conventioneer could improve his profit picture throughout 
the world. The Cash Box Camera catches glimpses of some of the people in 
their hospitality meeting rooms. 



1 — Maigret Meyerstein (Philips, France), Mr. & Mrs. Aaron Schroeder 
(USA), George Albert, President & Publisher of Cash Box, Geoffrey Everitt 
(Radio Luxembourg). 2 — George Albert, Nesuhi Ertegun (Atlantic) Lee 
Mendell (Liberty) and Marty Ostrow, Cash Box V.P. 3 — Antoni Figueiredo 
(Belter, Spain), Marty Ostrow, Joaquim Alfonso (Belter, Spain), George 


Albert, Francis Figueras (Belter, Spain). 4 — Geoff Milne (Decca, U.K.), 
George Albert, Marcel Stellman (Decca, U.K.) Walt Maguire (London 
Records, USA). 5 — Bill Gallagher (MCA), Klaus Haake (Roosevelt Music), 
George Albert, Bert Kaempfert, Hal Fein, Roosevelt Music (USA). 



1 — Neville Marten (Cash Box), Mrs. Mintangian (Durium), George Albert. 

2 — Barney Ales (Motown), George Albert. 3 — Gerry Teifer (Sundbury-Dunbar 
Music USA), Marty Ostrow. 4 — Alan Holmes (Robbins Music, London), Ian 
Ralfini (Robbins, London), Mr. Lambertini (F.D.H., France), George Albert, 
Mrs. L. Bournemann (F.D.H., Germany), Bert Corri (F.D.H., London). 


5 — George Albert, Don Pierce (Starday Records), Marty Ostrow. 6 — Mr. 
Desmarty (Ed: Pau; Beuscher, France), Mr. Sellier (Director of the Com- 
pany) George Albert, Sal Chianti MCA Music, USA. 7 — Mr. Moreno, Vinko 
Lesic, Mr. Seljan (all of Jugoton, Yugoslavia). 



1 — Marty Ostrow, Leon Cabat (Disques Vogue, France), George Albert. 

2 — Dag Haggquist, Gunner Bergstrom (Both of Sonet, Sweden), Peter Knight 
Jr., (Stigwood-Yaskiel, Germany), Gene Norman (GNP). 3 — Dave Berger 
(ABC Records), J. Lasker (Dunhill) George Albei-t, Dario Soria (RCA). 
4 — Marty Ostrow, Lou Reizner (Mercury) Shel Talmy (Indie Producer, U.K.), 
George Albert. 5 — P. Zegers (Holland Music, Holland), Lucky Carle (South- 


ern Music USA), Hans Dunk (Southern, Holland), George Albert, Tom Ward 
(Southern, U.K.), Marty Ostrow, Mario Conti (Southern, USA). 6 — Horst 
Schmolzi (DGG, Germany), British jazz musician Chris Barber, Nesuhi 
Ertegun (Atlantic Records USA), George Albert, Eddie Barclay (Barclay, 
France). 



1 — George Albert, Mr. De Pelgrims (Decca, Belgium), A. Fossoul (Decca, 
Belgium). 2 — Marty Ostrow, E. Baptista, (Discos Musart, Mexico), George 
Albert. 3 — Eric Steinmetz (MGM Records), Marty Ostrow, George Albert, 
Frank Mancini. 4 — ^R. Brohn, (Dick James Music, London), Mr. & Mrs. Dick 


James, Stephen James. 5 — George Albert, Mr. & Mrs. Russ Sanjek (BMI, 
USA). 6 — Bill Gallagher (MCA), Pete De Angelis (ABC, USA), George 
Albert, Mike Sloman (MCA, U.K.). 



1 — Ron Kass (Liberty Records), Mr. de Labbey (Rideau Rouge, Paris), Bob 
Reisdorf (Liberty Records, London). Seymour Zucker (Liberty Records, USA). 

2 — Seated Left to Right: — Madame Adamis (United Artists, Paris). Noel 
Rogers (United Artists, London). British singer Vera Lynn, Eddie Adamis 
(U.A. Paris). Standing Left to right: — Roger Welch (U.A. London). Ron 
Eyre (U.A.). Jack Haslinghuis (Phonogram, Holland). 3 — Carlos Cruz (D.J. 


of Portugal), Valentim de Carvalho (EMI, Portugal). Carlos Robalo (E.M.I. 
Portugal) P. Seljan (Jugoton), S. Kopun (Jugoton), V. Lesic (Organizer of 
the Spliit Festival of Yugoslavia) and S. Mrgic (Jugoton). 4 — British Singer 
Tom Jones being interviewed by D.J.s of Europe No. 1. 5 — Neil Galligan 
Planetary-Nom Music, Indie producer Shel Talmy. Andy Heath (Planetary 

NomU 



1 — Vittorio Somalvico (Sugar Music, Italy). Geoffrey Everett (Radio Luxem- 
bourg London), Cyril Simons (Leeds Music, London). Stig Anderson (Sweden 
Music, Stockholm). Louis Reizner (Mercury Records USA), and Marcel 
Maruani of Sugar Music France. 2 — Geoffrey Heath (Good Music, London). 
Roland Kluger (World Music & Palette Records of Belgium), and Pierre 
Meyer, also of World Music. 3 — Teddy Holmes of Chappells, London. Stuart 
Reid (Edwin Morris, London). Harry Bielefeldt (Chappells, Germany). Roy 


Berry (Campbell Connelly, London). 4 — Roger Maruani of Festival Recoi'ds of 
France pictured with composer Andre Popp and writer Pierre Cour, the team 
responsible for “Love is Blue” now climbing the Amei'ican Top 100 charts. 
Popp and Cour have just been signed to a three year contract to Festivals 
publishing company Igloo Music. 5 — Terry Dorin and Jack Oliver of Apple 
Music, London. The new Beatties company. 6 — Zafiro Artiste Juan Manuel 
Serrat and Joaquin Merino (Zafiro International). 






\ Gallo's 'Transplant' Account LP 


^ Gallo (Africa) Limited and Briga- 
( diers (Pty.) Limited have scored an 
international record scoop in the sign- 
‘ ing of contracts for the world rights 
on a set of two LP’s entitled “Human 
Heart Transplantation” by Prof. 
I Christiaan Neethling Barnard and 
* leading members of his famous Cape 
1 Town heart transplantation team. 

A The LP takes the form of a round 
I table discussion under the chairman- 
1 ship of Prof. Barnard and is designed 

( primarily for pre- and post graduate 
medical men throughout the world. 
It gives a detailed account of all the 
factors leading up to the world’s first 
1 * human heart transplantation ; how a 
\ patient and donor is selected; exactly 
f what precautions are taken; a detailed 
/ description of how tissue selection is 
done and how the actual operation is 

* 


performed. 

Albie Venter, director of Brigadiers 
and representative of Gallo (Africa) 
Limited will fly to Europe and the 
U.S. to negotiate special territory 
pressing rights for the records. 

Top photo: South Africa LP artist 
and tenor, Ge Korsten presents the 
first copy of “Human Heart Trans- 
plantation to Prof. C. N. Barnard (on 
left). All royalties accruing to Korsten 
from the sale of his new LP, “Al- 
ways”’ will be donated to the Chris 
Barnard Fund for surgical research. 

Bottom photo: Prof. Barnard and 
leading members of his heart trans- 
plantation team during the recordings 
for the historical set of LP records. 
From left to right: Prof. Barnard, Dr. 
J. F. Hitchcock, Registrar and Dr. M. 
C. Botha, Pathologist. 


'La Mancha' CIcffer To 
Baton Vienna Opening 

[■'HOLLYWOOD — Mitch Leigh, compo- 
/ ser of the score of “Man Of La Man- 
cha,” has been invited to conduct the 
' orchestra at the opening night’s per- 
formance of the musical drama in 
Vienna this month. Leigh, who has 
already conducted for “Man Of La 

I Mancha” openings in Spain, Israel, 
\ Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, 
r Czechoslovakia and Australia, will 

II fly to Europe for the Austrian open- 
^ ing and to supervise arrangements for 
i the show’s debut in London in April. 

He will be accompanied by his part- 
ner Milton Herson, president of Mark 
0 Century Corporation, which owns the 
rights to “Man Of La Mancha.” 

A 

Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


Suit Settled On 
French 'Sugar Town' 

NEW YORK — Criterion Music of Los 
Angeles has been successful in its legal 
action against Denis Pantis, Citation 
Records, who distributed an allegedly 
illegal French lyric to “Sugar Town” 
by Lee Hazlewood through Trans- 
Canada Disques, Inc. Citation Records, 
Pantis’ company, paid damages and 
legal fees and agreed to cease any 
further infringements on the Criterion 
Music Corporation copyright. 

This action was initiated to prevent 
illegal French lyrics being written 
to Criterion songs. The case was han- 
dled by Ross Carson of Gowling, Mac- 
Tavish, Osborne and Henderson of Ot- 
tawa, Canada, for the complaintant. 


Brolly To manage MCA In Britain 


NEW YORK — Brian Brolly has been 
appointed managing director of MCA 
Records Ltd., the British company 
recently established by the American 
entertainment complex. 



Brian Brolly 


MCA Records Ltd. will manufacture 
and distribute records under the MCA 
label and will be exclusive distributors 
in the United Kingdom and Ireland 
for American Decca as well as Coral 
and Uni Records. These labels were 
previously handled by British Decca. 

Brolly is a product of MCA’s ex- 
ecutive training program, having 
started as a salesman in the TV film 
sales division in 1957 ; and for the 
past three years he has been a direc- 
tor of MCA (England) T.V., and has 
supervised and developed MCA’s Eur- 
opean and British TV sales distribu- 
tion operations. 

In addition to being named manag- 
ing director of MCA Records Ltd., 
Brolly also will become a director of 
all other MCA United Kingdom com- 
panies, including Universal Pictures 
Ltd. and MCA (England) T.V. Ltd. 
Brolly will be replacing Cecil Tenant, 
who recently lost his life in an auto- 
mobile accident. 


John Barry & Brian Forbes Join 
Ember Labe! In Executive Slots 


CANNES, France — Composer John 
Barry, winner of two Academy 
Awards for the score to “Bom Free” 
and the title song of the flick, and 
Bryan Forbes, director and writer of 
such films as “King Rat,” “The 
Whisperers” and “The L-Shaped 
Room,” have joined Ember Records, 
the independent British diskery, in 
executive capacities. With the help 
of Barry and Forbes, Ember is look- 
ing to expand its activities and to 
create a new international image. 

Barry has been named chairman of 
Ember, and he will be executive 
producer for all major new recording 
activities for the company. He will 
be as active as his heavy schedule of 
film commitments allows. Forbes, who 
joins the board of directors of Ember, 
will combine his talents with Barry’s 
in all facets of the film activities of 

First Biz Complex 
Formed In Argentina 

BUENOS AIRES — Palito Ortega, for 
six years the leading teen artist in 
Argentina, has reported that his re- 
cently formed Clanort Producciones 
will start intensive record, publishing 
and TV production this year, with 
several records, songs and programs 
already on the way. Ortega’s own 
contract with RCA remains untouched, 
it was also stated, and he will travel 
next April to the States for a new 
album, to be recorded in Nashville, 
and contacts with UjS. publishers. It 
is the first time that an organization 
of this sort has been formed in this 
country, covering several fields. 

Budapest A Stop On 
Ella's Tour Abroad 

BEVERLY HILLS— The highlight of 
Ella Fitzgerald’s 1968 concert tour 
through the whole of the European 
Continent will be her anticipated 
premier concert appearance in the city 
of Budapest, Feb. 29. 

Her 1968 European Tour is being 
presented by Norman Granz, and is 
slated to play 21 European cities. 
Opening night concert was in Munich 
on February 1, and closing date is Co- 
penhagen on March 6. Her musical 
accompaniment on the 1968 European 
Tour will be the Tee Carson Trio. 

Balance of the Ella Fitzgerald sing- 
ing itinerary calls for concei't dates in 
Frankfurt (2), Amsterdam (3), Brus- 
sels (4), Zurich (6), Stuttgart (7), 
Dusseldorf (8), Hamburg (9), Berlin 
(11), Reims (13), Grenoble (15), Paris 
(16), London (17), Regio Emilia (24), 
Milano (25), Basel (26), Vienna (27), 
Rotterdam (March 2), Stockholm 
( March 4) and Copenhagen (6). 


the company (i.e. soundtracks). 

Barry’s first act as chairman has 
been to appoint Jimmy Henney, for- 
mer head of the professional depart- 
ment at Chappell Music, to be in 
charge of Ember’s promotion and 
recording activities. Henney will act 
as liaison between Barry and Forbes 
in all their endeavors. Henney was 
appointed to Ember’s bd. of direc. 

Tying in with Henney’s appoint- 
ment is the formation of Henney 
Music Corporation, which will be ex- 
panded to become the music publish- 
ing arm of Ember. Deals are now 
being set with writers and publishers 
to acquire product. Henney is joint 
managing director of Henney Music 
with Jeffrey /S. Kruger, another Em- 
ber board member. The twelve pub- 
beries presently incorporated in 
Florida Music will be brought under 
the one big umbrella of Henney Music. 



GLOBAL MEET: Hilversum, the “Ra- 
dio-City” in the heart of the Nether- 
lands, was the meeting place for 56 
staff members of PPI-Organizations 
from all over the world, at the recent 
1968 International Convention of N. V. 
Philips’ Phonographische Industrie, 
It was the first convention since 1956. 
No less than 26 countries from all 
five continents were gathered for two 
days in Grand Hotel Gooiland for a 
sturdy program of music, business and 
music (and some good food and drink 
— to be complete). 

Mr. Solleveld, president of N. V. 
Philips’ Phonographische Industrie, 
offered a special de luxe casette re- 
corder with an engraving “For Out- 
standing Performances” to A. Duch- 
able, manager of Philips in Switzer- 
land, who recently celebrated his 40th 
anniversary with Philips. 


71 




/ff7 \v\\ yf 7/ \ V^ /T//tm 

CashBox 

vVmW /// / \\V\I//// 


Pre-tax profits for the Decca Record Group for the half year ended 30tn 
September, 1967, declined from £.1,483,000 ($4,152,400) to £1,443,000 ($4,040,- 
000) and the net figure from £813,000 ($2,276,400) to £753,000 ($2,108,400). 
Refiecting a general sales increase throughout the group, turnover rose by 
£1,000,000 ($2,800,000) to £18,900,000 ($52,920,000). Trading profits were up 
from £2,550,000 ($7,140,000) to £2,738,000 ($7,666,400), but there were sub- 
stantial higher charges for depreciation and interest. It is pointed out by the 
Directors that turnover and profits in the second six months normally exceed 
those of the first half. Turnover in the full year to March 31st, 1967, was 
£40,000,000 ($112,000,000) and profits before tax £4,451,000 ($12,462,800). 
Meanwhile, the interim dividend is declared at V 2 d (17^) per 10 shillings 
($1.40) share — the previous dividend was 3/5d (48^). 

Come freeze and squeeze or assorted other curtailments which threaten to 
cut back leisure spending, the British disk business is spiralling upwards 
apparently undaunted by the high level economy measures. Official Board of 
Trade sources reveal, for instance, that in October record sales totalled £2,771,- 
000 ($7,758,800), a new high for the month which augers well for a year-end 
record figure of more than £27,000 ($80,000). Domestic sales in October 
accounted for £2,771,000 ($6,711,600) — a 25% increase on home sales in the 
previous October. Exports, however, were 9% down at £374,000 ($1,047,200). 
At 10,118,000 production of disks in October was at its highest level since 
December, 1965, and production of all types of disks was up on the correspond- 
ing period in 1966. The nighty push on albums is revealed in the fact that 
4,546,000 albums were produced in October, 1967, against 3,629,000 in the pre- 
ceding October. The 45 r.p.m. trade increased from 3,978,000 records minted 
in October, 1966, to 5,541,000 pressed last October. 

Paddy Fleming, who for the past 14 years has helmed Philips Records pro- 
motion department, steps into a new and significant role this month. He is to 
head up Mercury Records here, which is to be made a separate division of the 
Philips family. In addition to the greater independence given to the label by 
this move, Fleming will also Launch a subsidiary label. Smash Records, which 
will release material from British as well as American acts. In taking over his 
new duties, Fleming will work in association with Lou Reisner who will over- 
see waxing of new artists and will report to Leslie Gould, Philips British chief. 
Appropriately enough the Mercury label will introduce among its initial re- 
leases, a new act called Freedom. 

With Brian Brolly in the driver’s seat, MGS bows its operations here with 
the release of three singles — Brenda Lee’s “That’s Alright”; the Hobbits’ 
“Daffodil Days” and John Rowles’ “If I Only Had Time.” First album releases 
are scheduled for April. A move into the budget album market and the car- 
tridge field is on the immediate horizon too. The new independent set-up will 
utilize the MCA and UNI logos and will be pressed and distributed by Decca 
which previously handled American Decca product. In the race for top talents 
— both performers and executives — MCA has set Mike Sloman as administra- 
tive head and a&r controller. Sales and marketing manager is Peter Roddis 
who moves over from RCA. And Mike Leander has signed a long-term deal as 
producer with the label. Other staffers include Alan Crowther who becomes 
MCA label manager (having left Saga) and a pactee from Major Minor, Roger 
Watson who becomes promotion manager. 

Following the death of Brian Epstein last year, Clive Epstein, Chairman of 
Nems Enterprises, has announced that Vic Lewis is to take up the post of 
Managing Director. Announcing the new appointment, Epstein said, “This 
appointment marks the beginning of a period of vigorous domestic and in- 
ternational expansion for Nems Enterprises. In the immediate future we shall 
be increasing the scope of our organization in the field of Artists’ Agency 
and Management, legitimate theatre and film agency, independent record pro- 
duction and the European representation of American acts.” Epstein also con- 
firmed that the company would continue to have the active support of the 
Beatles who are shareholders. Lewis has been a Director of Nems since Feb- 
ruary, 1966. Coincidental with his new appointment, Lewis announced that an 
agreement had been signed with American agent Jerry Perenchio which would 
result in the first U.K. appearance of CBS artist Andy Williams in May accom- 
panied by Henri Mancini. 

The merger of the artistic ability of Steve Rowland and the business acumen 
of Ronnie Oppenheimer is proving a successful one for Double R Productions. 
Formed in August, 1966, and activiated in September, 1967, the company is 
already celebrating success in the charts with “Paradise Lost” by the Herd. 
Rowland is, of course, responsible for all Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and 
Tick’s successes on Fontana. Now their own Camp label makes its debut with 
“Cold Turkey” by Big Boy Pete, and the label is to be distributed in the U.K. 
by Polydor and in the States by Atlantic. Oppenheimer and Rowland are to 
visit America in March setting up an American office to deal with their music 
publishing outlets Quorum (run here by Campbell Connelly) and Warland (a 
subsidiary of Carlin Music), and to promote their artists in America. It will 
operate on an exchange basis. They will also negotiate a tour for the Herd 
and discuss the month-long tour set for late March for Dave Dee, Dozy, etc., 
which will also include TV appearances. 

After three years with Sparta Music, Mike Berry moves over to the new 
Apple Publishing company headed by Terry Doran. As Professional Manager, 
Berry will be responsible for seeking new talent and promotion as well as ac- 
quiring copyrights. Apple has got off to a good start with their first release 
“Dear Oelilah” by the Grapefruit issued on RCA and launched by a sparkling 
champagne reception to which the Beatles gave their moral support. After just 
one week of release the disk looks ripe for healthy sales. 

Eddie Boyd in Britain for a three-month stay will record for the Blue Hori- 
zon label which is distributed through CBS. First single coupling Boyd with 
the Fleetwood Mac is “The Big Boat” and an album is also being planned. 
Blue Horizon’s first disk on its own logo is “It’s Okay With Me Baby” by the 
Chicken Shack and the first album is “The Fleetwood Mac.” 

At a time when MGM Records dropped plans to issue Eric Burdon and the 
Animals’ latest release “Sky Pilot” because of certain incompatibility prob- 
lems, Page One Records, an independent label run by Larry Page, is forging 
ahead with the stereo single idea. First release is “I’m A Train” by the Tears 
Of Joy. And the independent banner, facilitated by Philips Records, therefore 
makes its mark in music history. 

Quickies: Following their “Here We Go Round The Mulberry Bush” smash. 
Traffic have a potential hit with their follow-up, “No Face, No Name, No Num- 
ber” from their “Mr. Fantasy” album on Island. . . . Proposed tour of Czecho- 
slovakia and Russia by the New Vaudeville Band. . . . Spring tour of Australia 
and Japan for Traffic. Having collected a Gold Disk for their first chart entry 
“Baby, Now That I’ve Found You,” the Foundations was another Tony Macau- 
lay number “Back on my Feet Again” (Pye). 


Great Britain's Best Sellers 


This Last Weeks on 
Week Week Charts 

12 4 Everlasting Love — The Love Affair (CBS) E. H. Morris 

2 8 3 *Am I That Easy To Forget — Englebert Humperdinck 

(DsCCfl) 

3 1 5 *Ballad Of Bonnie & Clyde — Georgie Fame (CBS) Clan 

4 7 3 Judy In Disguise — John Fred & His Playboy Band (Pye) 

Jewell 

5 6 6 Walk Away Renee — Four Tops (Tamla Motown) Flamingo 

6 4 9 Daydream Believer — The Monkees (RCA) Screen Gems 

7 15 2 Everything I Am — Plastic Penny (Page One) Essex 

8 3 8 *Magical Mystery Tour — The Beatles (Parlophone) Northern 

9 5 9 *Hello Goodbye — The Beatles (Parlophone) Northern 

10 12 3 *Tin Soldier — Small Faces (Immediate) Immediate 

11 — 1 She Wears My Ring — Solomon King (Columbia) Acuff Rose 

12 9 9 *I’m Coming Home — Tom Jones (Decca) Donna 

13 — 1 Mighty Quinn — Manfred Mann (Fontana) Feldman 

14 — 1 Bend Me Shape Me — Amen Corner (Deram) Carlin 

15 — 1 ’"Suddenly You Love Me — Tremeloes (CBS) Skidmore 

16 11 10 ’"World — Bee Gees (Polydor) Abigail 

17 — II Can Take Or Leave Your Love — Herman’s Hermits (Co- 

lumbia) Active 

18 18 2 Darlin’ — Beach Boys (Capitol) Immediate 

19 10 8 *Thank U Very Much — The Scaffold (Parlophone) Noel 

Gay 

20 20 1 ’"Paradise Lost — The Herd (Fontana) Lynn 

’"Local copyrights 


Great Britain's Top Ten LP's 


1 The Sound Of Music — Soundtrack 6 
(RCA) 

2 Val Doonican Rocks But Gently — 7 

Val Doonican (Pye) 

3 Reach Out — The Four Tops (Tam- 8 
la Motown) 

4 Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club 9 
Band — The Beatles (Parlophone) 

5 Their Satanic Majesties Request 10 
— The Rolling Stones (Decca) 


12 Smash Hits — Tom Jones 
(Decca) 

The Supremes Greatest Hits — 
The Supremes (Tamla Motown) 
The Four Tops Greatest Hits — 
The Four Tops (Tamla Motown) 
British Motown Chartbusters — 
Various (Tamla Motown) 

The Last Waltz — Englebert Hum- 
perdinck (Decca) 



THE TALK OF LONDON TOWN — Diana Ross and the Supremes are shown 
here after their opening show at London’s Talk Of The Town nitery. The 
Motown group had flown in from Nice earlier that afternoon. The opening 
night audience included such notables as Samantha Eggar (second from left) 
and Michael Caine (center). 



DOIN’ THEIR THING — Percussionist Ringo Starr pictured on the left here 
while visiting the Mayfair (London) offices of NEMS Enterprises, Ltd. He is 
posed with the firm’s newly appointed managing director Vic Lewis. 


72 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


Belffium 




Mexico 


A few weeks ago, the well-known Belgian popsinger Marc Aryan released 
a new song on his own label “Markal,” distributed by the E.M.I. group in 
Brussels: “Nr. 1 au hit Parade.” Only 4 weeks after his appearance on the 
Belgian market, the song reached the top of the charts in Belgium for the 
• French-speaking part of the country. 

American singer Bobby Vinton is “in” again with his new song “Please Love 
^ Me Forever.” 

The Fortunes are doing very well in Belgium with two new single: “Just 
Another Dream” and “Sunday Night.” 

The famous Spencer Davis Group will now be released by the United Artists 
Label. We expect their last number, “Mr. Second Class.” 

„ Sharp upward move in the charts from James Royal’s “Call My Name.” 


^ ^ — — — 

Belgium's Best Sellers 


(Flemish Section) 


This Last 
Week Week 
1 1 

■■ 2 2 

5 3 

4 4 

3 5 

7 6 

8 7 

, 8 

10 9 

, - 10 


2 1 

1 2 

3 3 

6 4 


— 7 

— 8 

8 9 

8 10 


I’m Coming Home (Tom Jones /Decca) 

Hello Goodbye (The Beatles / Parlophone ) 

Baby Come Back (The Equals / President) 

All my Love (Cliff Richard / Columbia ) 

Arme Joe (Will Tura/ Palette) 

Les Roses Blanches (Les Sunlights / Vogue ) 

World (The Bee Gees/Polydor) 

Daydream Believer (The Monkees/R.C.A.) 

Move (Jess and James /Palette) 

Oh Clown (Marc Dex/ Arcade) 

( W alloon— -French Speaking) 

No. 1 Au Hit Parade (Marc Aryan/ Markal) 

Les Roses Blanches (Les Sunlights / Vogue ) 

Call My Name (James Royal/C.B.S.) 

Hush (Billy Joe Royal/C.B.S.) 

Hello Goodbye (The Beatles / Parlophone ) 

Move (Jess and James /Palette) 

Days Of Pearly Spencer (David McW illiams / Ma j or-Minor 
J’ai Tant De Reves Dans Mes Bagages (Adamo/H.M.V.) 
I’m Coming Home (Tom Jones /Decca) 

Gimmie Little Sign (Brenton Wood/Reprise) 


Spanish singer Massiel made her debut in Mexico at the night club “Quid.” 
At the same time, Musart records released her first long play here. Next week 
Spanish idol Raphael will appear at “El Patio” which already has booked 80% 
of its reservations. 

Capitol released a new extended play by Carlos Lico who recently contracted 
for performances in Las Vegas. 

Gamma Records is strongly promoting a new Spanish voice Maria Ostiz 
who cut her first recordings at Hispavox. Maria composes and accompanies 
her own songs with guitar. Prom the same company (Gamma) we received the 
record that is occupying second place in Spain Pic Nic’s “Callate Nina.” The 
group is composed of three Spanish musicians, an English vocalist, and a 
Mexican interpreter. 

RCA released a new extended play with Los Anillos de Bronce (Brass Ring) 
on which the most probable hit will be “Sunny.” Other new releases include 
Sonia “la unica” (Lagrimas amargas” and Estafa de amor’), Eydie Gorme 
(Estaba equivacada” and “He Needs Me Now”), Jefferson Airplane (“Martha” 
and “Watch Her Ride”), Los Brillos (“Rufalina” and “Examina tu conciencia”) 
and an extended play with Italian singer Eliana Silli. 

CBS released the Buckinghams’ “Susan” Los Supremos’, Los Supremos’ 
“He’s Raining In My Sunshine,” Los 4 Brillantes’ “Bueno bonito” and “Mi 
limon, mi limonero,” Argentinian Leo Dan’s extended play titled “Asi soy you,” 
and Paul Revere’s “Mo reen” and “I Had A Dream.” 


Mexico's Best Sellers 


1 Yo, Tu Y Las Rosas — Los Piccolinos (CBS) — Hermanitas Nunez 
(Orfeon) — Hermanitas Jimenez (Peerless) 

2 Hazme Una Senal ( Gimme a little sign) — Brenton Wood (Gamma) — 
Roberto Jordan (RCA) — Manola Munoz (Musart). — Carmina (Rex) 

3 Quinceanera — Los Vlamers (Musart) — Tono Quirazco (Orfeon) — 
Frankie y Los IMatadores (Peerless) 

4 Boogaloo #1 — Leo Acosta (Capitol) — Los Aragon (Musart) 

5 Alto Mas Alto (Higher and higher) — Jackie Wilson (Orfeon) — 

Los Hitters (Orfeon) — Los Zignos (RCA) 

6 Pata Pata — Miriam Makeba (Reprise) — Los Rockin Devils (Orfeon) — 
Los Kleiners (Capitol) 

7 Cenizas — Los Yaki (Capitol) 

8 Urgencia — Jose Martin ( Peerless ) — J orge del Rosa (Orfeon) — 

Imelda Miller (RCA) — Bienvenido Granda (Orfeon) 

9 Norma La De Guadalajara — Perez Prado (RCA) 

10 Conozco A Los Dos — Frankie y Los Matadores (Peerless) 


next time 
you are in 

South Africa 




A1 Martino is 
one of the many 
EMI artists who enjoy 
good sales in South Africa. 




VUfT iimim 
IMM 

iHf CBfAISSI RfCOROWG ORCANISAIION IN IHt WOBID 


• ••• you can check on EMI’s claims about global 
ramifications — about recording and manufacturing 
facilities in eveiy part of the world — about sales 
organisations which get into every conceivable 
outlet — about unique connections with the 
most active retail establishments everywhere— and 
about the way EMI artists are promoted here, 
there and everywhere to give them 

a truly international stature. 

The EMI Company in South Africa is : — 

EMI (Soutb Africa) (Pty) Ltd. 32 Steele Street, Steeledale, Johannesburg. Tel: Johannesburg 869-2661/7 



Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


73 



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CashBox Argentina 


Milton Nascimento, the newcomer who appeared strong in 
the latest Rio de Janeiro International Fest with his composition “Travessia,” 
IS on his w^ to New York and will record for A&M Records. The invitation 
came from Creed Taylor who saw him at that contest. 

A good new vocal quintet called Pop 5 is showing up in the disk scene after 
S ,^^&htclub career through a double-compact of the Fermata group label 
Som/Maior. 

We have news from France that Elias Regina (Philips), who was presented 
at the Midem representing Brazil, was one of the great successes of the 
mtei’national presentations this year. She was the only artist who was asked 
to repeat her performance, and it is reported that she was requested for inter- 
national presentations in several countries. 

It is confirmed that Rosemary Clooney will soon be presented in Brazil as 
a beginning of the international season previously announced. Another chanter 
who is also being expected later this year is Austrian composer Udo Jurgens. 
Local impresarios and TV stations are fighting to present more important 
names of the international scene, and the Brazilian public is taking advantage 
of it, since it was announced that other toppers like Miriam Makeba, Brenda 
Lee, New Vaudeville Band and pianist Earl Grant are being requested for 
presentations here. 

Brazilian concert pianist Ana Stella Schic travels to the United States where 
she has several concerts scheduled, starting in Washington, D.C. After one 
month in the U.S., she will go to Europe. In Portugal she will be a member 
of the jury in the famous “Viana Da Motta” contest in its 10th Anniversary 
and will perform in the magnificent Teatro S. Carlos. From there to France, 
England, Italy, etc. 


Brazil's Best Sellers 


This 

Week 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 


8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 


Last 

Week 

1 Pata Pata (n.p.) Miriam Makeba/Reprise-CBD 

2 *Eu Daria A Minha Vida (Genial) Roberto Carlos /CBS 

3 San Francisco (Mundo Musical) Scott McKenzie/CBS 

4 *P’Ra Nunca Mais Chorar (RCA) Vanusa/RCA Victor 

6 Hello Goodbye (Fermata) The Beatles /Odeon-Parlophone 

5 *Carolina (Arlequim) Chico Buarque/RGE; Cynara & Cybele/CBS; 

Doris Monteiro/Odeon 

7 When Summer Is Gone (RCA) Gary Lewis/RCA Victor 

8 Georgia On My Mind (n.p.) The Uniques/Paula Records 

10 A Whiter Shade Of Pale (Fermata) Procol Harum/London-Odeon 

12 The Tracks Of My Tears (RCA) Johnny Rivers/RCA Victor 

15 Lonely (n.p.) Lovin’ Spoonful /Kama Sutra-Rozenblit 

11 *Alegria Alegria (Arlequim) Caetano Veloso/Philips 
17 *Eu Te Amarei (RCA) Mauro Sergio/RCA Victor 

16 *Lucinha (Fermata) Ed Costa /RCA Victor 

19 *Eu Gostava Muito De Voce, Sabe (Arlequim) Roberto Barreiros/ 
Chantecler 

13 Words (Vitale) The Monkees/Colgems-RCA 

14 *Roda Viva (Arlequim) Chico Buarque de Hollanda/RGE 

— Aranjuez, Mon Amour (n.p.) Lafayette/CBS; Richard Anthony/ 
CBS 

9 *Maria, Carnival E Cinzas (Arlequim) Roberto Carlos/CBS 

— Bernadette (n.p.) The Four Tops/Motown-Rozenblit 
* Original Brazilian Recording 


Brazil's Top Tvrelve LP's 

This Last 
Week Week 

1 1 *Em Ritmo De Aventura — Roberto Carlos/CBS 

2 3 *A Banda Do Canecao — Canecao Brass Band/Polydor-CBD 

3 2 Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band — The Beatles /Parlophone- 

Odeon 

4 6 *Alegria Alegria— Wilson Simonal/Odeon 

5 7 *As 12 Mais Da Juventude — Os Carbonos/ Beverly 

6 4 *As 14 Mais, Vol. 20 — Several Brazilian Artists /CBS 

7 5 *Obrigado Querida — Agnaldo Timoteo/Odeon 

8 8 *0 Realejo — Chico Buarque de Hollanda/RGE 

9 9 *Eu Te Amo Mesmo Assim — Martinha/AU-Rozenblit 

10 10 *Jequibau Na Broadway — Mario Albanese/ Chantecler 

11 — Golden Hits — Johnny Rivers /RCA Victor 

12 — America — Herb Alpert & Tijuana Brass /A&M-Fermata 

*Original Brazilian Recording 


Brazil's Top Six Double~Compacts 

This Last 
Week W’eek 

1 1 Anna — The Beatles /Parlophone-Odeon 

2 4 *Em Ritmo De Aventura, Vol. 1 — Roberto Carlos/CBS 

3 3 The Tracks Of My Tears — Johnny Rivers /RCA Victor 

4 2 Dio Come Ti Amo — Gigliola Cinquetti/RGE 

5 — *Minha Primeira Desilusao — Silvinha/Odeon 

6 5 Poor Side Of Town — Johnny Rivers /RCA Victor 

* Original Brazilian Recording 


France's Best Sellers 


This Last Weeks on 
Week Week Charts 

15 4 Les Roses Blanches (Les Sunlights) AZ; Meridian 

2 1 13 Dans Une Heure (Sheila) Carrere; Carrere 

3 2 7 Paulette (Les Chariots) Vogue; Vogue International 

4 3 7 Comme d’Habitude (Claude Frangois) Fleche; Barclay 

5 — 1 Massachusetts (The Bee Gees) Polydor; Tournier 

6 9 3 Comme Un Gargon (Sylvie Vartan) RCA; Euro France-Tilt 

7 6 4 Histoire de Clou (Adamo) EMI; Pa the Marconi 

8 4 3 Hello Goodbye (The Beatles) Odeon; Northern-Toumier 

9 — 1 Days Of Pearly Spencer (David McWilliams) Maxi; 

Tournier 

10 — 1 Hush (Billy Joe Royal) CBS; Chappell 


Mexican top composer and chanter Armando Manzanero, Spanish chanter 
Raphael, U.S. artists Pete Terrace and Neil Sedaka, along with Jose Feliciano 
and French stars Johnny Hallyday and Sylvie Vartan are among the list of 
visitors to Buenos Aires in the near future. These contracts are aimed at the 
rich Carnival-dance market, which means strong money for promoters and 
impresarios in this country. In most cases TV appearances are also involved. 

Of course, there will also be plenty of work for local artists, and most of the 
4,000 sports clubs existing in the country are programming dance parties with 
some sort of live performance. 

Speaking about artists and performances, manager Daniel Gutierrez sends 
word about what may really be a record for Argentina. It is related to tropical 
music group Los Wawanco, one of the first to exploit the boom of Colombian 
cumbias in this part of the world. The group, formed about ten years ago, has 
already recorded 24 LP’s and is currently preparing what is believed to become 
one of their strongest themes: a version of a folk song penned by Gomez Car- 
rillo, “Dos Palomitas.” The Wawanco are finishing a three-month tour of the 
whole nation, with 66 working-days which will net them about 16 million pesos 
(nearly $50,000), which is a nice figure for this country. 

Music Hall has released new albums by tropical chantress La Lupe, recorded 
with the orchestras directed by Tito Puente and Chico O’Farrill, Pete Terrace 
(cut by A/S Records), Roger Williams, this time with Latin-flavored music, 
melodic chanter Julio Jaramillo and local folk singer Julio Molina Cabral. There 
is also a waxing of two strong film tunes, “Dr. Doolittle” and “Live For Life,” 
by Jose Carli and his orchestra, and new albums by teen group the Walkers 
and chanter Billy Bond. ] 

CBS’ news this week is related to a strong campaign in behalf of Mexican 
trio Los Panchos who arrived in town last week and will spend about two 
months here. The diskery is also releasing a new single by Tito Rodriguez, 
another top name in the melodic music field, an EP by Sergio Perez playing 
music written by Manzanero, an album with Guarania music by the Serenata 
Tropical Orchestra, and a budget-priced “Harmony” LP by Donato Racciati 
and his Uruguayan Tango Orchestra. 

RCA has released a new single by the Mamas & the Papas, “Glad To Be " 
Unhappy.” Another strong item is “La Copa Rota” cut by Jose Feliciano. There ' 
are also albums by Carlos Di Fulvio, tango artists Baffa-Berlingieri-Goyeneche, | 
and teen group Los Bull Dogs, as well as EP’s by Evangelina Zalazar, Los 
Crucenos and Palito Ortega. 

Mario Kaminsky of Microfon reports the label has inked folk group Los 
Kererinkas and released their first single. There is also a new recording by 
Allon and His Purple Band. On the LP side the news is an album by tropical 
music group Los Costenos. 

Mauricio Brenner of Fermata reports the release of a new album by Brazilian 
Zimbo Trio, this time with string orchestra backing. Brenner has been working ^ 
for years on the promotion of Brazilian music in Argentina with releases by 
well-known artists as Chico Buarque, Maysa, Agostinho Dos Santos, and it 
seems that this work is starting to get good results since the music from that 
country is receiving more attention than ever before. , 

Santos Lipesker, back from the Cosquin Folk Music Festival, is excited with 
the success obtained by folk group Los Fronterizos at this event where they 
opened the show with the backing of a 50-piece orchestra. According to Lipe- 
sker, about 120,000 persons gathered at the opening which should show that 
folk music is extremely popular in this country. A pop music in Carlos Paz 
(near Cosquin) on the other hand was poorly received showing the preference 
of the public towards folk artists. i 

Disc Jockey has released a new Dalida album with the latest recordings by 
this French artist, as well as another Charles Aznavour album recorded in 
Spanish. On the local sides, the new album by Rosamel Araya and another by 
Pepito Perez are also selling extremely well turning the summer season into 
a sort of sales bonanza for the label. The new single by Perez, appearing this 
week in the charts, also seems a sure hit-to-be. (Ji 

Walter Thiers, head of Ten Records, infos about the outing of an album 
recorded by writer Ernesto Sabato with excerpts from two of his latest works. 
There is also an album by another poet, Alberto Girri, and good results are 
expected from both. 


Argentina's Best Sellers 


This Last 
Week Week 

1 11 Pata Pata Miriam Makeba (Music Hall) ^ 

2 1 *Quiero Llenarme De Ti (Melograf) Sandro, Jacko Zeller, H. Fi- 

gueroa Reyes (CBS); Cinco Latinos (Quinto); Silvia del Rio 
(Erato); Lord Klave (Philips); Los Tahures (Odeon) 

3 2 The World We Knew (Relay) Frank Sinatra (Music Hall); Cai’a- * 

velli (CBS); Paul Jourdan (RCA); Bert Kaempfert, Vincent , 
Morocco (Philips); Nueva Generacion (Quinto) i 

4 3 La Pata Pela Bovea y sus Vallenatos (RCA) 

5 12 *E1 Rey Lloro (Fermata) Los Gatos (RCA) ^ 

6 5 Aranjuez Mon Amour Richard Anthony (Odeon); Caravelli, Jacko ’*■ 

Zeller (CBS); Vincent Morocco (Philips); Lucio Milena (Disc 
Jockey) 

7 4 *La Balsa (Fermata) Los Gatos (RCA) i 

8 6 *Todo Es Mentira (Fei’mata) Palito Ortega (RCA) \ 

9 15 The Rain, The Park and Other Things The Cowsills (Philips) P 

10 9 Esta Tarde Vi Dover (Relay) Armando Manzanero (RCA); Los ^ 

Cuatro Brillantes (CBS) 

11 10 Hello Goodbye (Fermata) The Beatles (Odeon) j 

12 7 Lenita (Relay) Nilton Cesar (RCA) 

13 8 *No Pisen Las Flores (Fermata) Palito Ortega (RCA) 

14 — *Te Quiero Mucho Pepito Perez (Disc Jockey) 

15 13 Soy Como Tu Quieres Luis Aguile (CBS) o 

16 — La Copa Rota Jose Feliciano (RCA) 

17 — Cuando Sali De Cuba Luis Aguile (CBS) 

18 — *La Burrita (Imar) Los Wawanco (Odeon) 

19 14 La Juventud Los Iracundos (RCA) 

19 17 Dandy The Herman’s Hermits (Odeon) V 

20 — I Love You, You Love Me Anthony Quinn (Odeon) 

20 16 Amor De Pobre (Smart) Pepito Perez (Disc Jockey; Miltinho 

(Odeon) Los Nocturnos (Music Hall) 

(*) Local 


74n 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 ^ 



Japan 






Canaaa 


George Chakiris and his seven dancing members arrive here Feb. 23 for a 
fortnight tour throughout the main cities of Japan. Also scheduled in Feb. is 
Ravi Shankar whose World Pacific LP has already been released in anticipation 
of his tour. 

In wake of the well-sold Rolling Stones LP, “Your Poll Winners/The Rolling 
Stones” which sold some 30,000 copies, their new LP, “Their Satanic Majesties 
Request” scheduled for release in March, has already received tremendous 
advance orders from record shops. This new LP, including “She’s A Rainbow,” 
“In Another Land,” “2,000 Light Years From Home,” “2,000 Man,” “The 
Lantern,” “All Together,” “Citadel,” “Gomper” and others, promises to be 
more popular than “Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.” 

King Records is strongly promoting their release of ballad verses with such 
artists as Tom Jones and Engelbert Humperdinck aiming at another purchasing 
generation. Among their other new singles released this month, are Louis 
Armstrong’s “What A Wonderful World,” Ray Charles with “Yesterday,” 
Sergio Mendes and Brasil ’66 with “Day Tripper.” 

Nippon Victor released the 2nd LP of Voice Of Young America Series with 
“Susanne/Noel Harrison” on Reprise. This series is gathering great popularity 
with the young generation as attested by the favorable sales of the first issue. 

Nippon Grammophon has also been conducting a heavy promotion for Bee 
Gees via spot ads on air, newspapers, and magazines for their impending hit 
“Massachusetts” on Polydor. The tune has already sold 50,000 copies in a 
fortnight after release. 


Japan's Besi Sellers 


Columbia Records have announced pretty Sylvia Harding has been appointed 
sales representative. Miss Harding was formerly working internally in the 
Toronto sales office for the past nine years and comes very qualified for her 
new position. Bob Dylan’s movie “Don’t Look Back” opened in Toronto which 
coincided with the release of his album “John Wesley Harding.” With the 
excitement the movie and album release has caused, Columbia anticipate the 
disc will shortly be in line for a gold record in Canada. 

Columbia’s popular young recording artist and actress, Caterina Caselli, from 
Italy, made a one-night appearance at Toronto’s Maple Leaf Gardens. With 
some 13,000 in attendance, she broke the place up with her hits of past and 
many current American hits sung in Italian. Miss Caselli’s latest single, “Sola 
Spento,” was so well-received and encored, it is a good indication it will be 
charted in Italy. Ethnic radio stations in Toronto and Montreal are already 
giving it lots of spins. 

Elvis Presley’s latest RCA Victor offering “Guitar Man” from his soundtrack 
album “Clambake” is getting lots of air-play on top forty and country music 
stations across the nation. DJ’s unanimously agree it’s the best single in the 
past five years by Presley, which should send it to the top of the charts. 

I RCA’s George Hamilton IV dropped into the Cash Box office during his one- 
! week appearance at the Horeshoe Tavern in Toronto. His current release “Lit- 
tle World Girl” is fast climbing the national country charts, although the flip 
side, “Song For A Winter’s Night” which was written by Gordon Lightfoot, 
is being played by many middle-of-the-road stations. 


This Last ALBUMS 

Week Week 

1 1 Monkees Golden Album— The Monkees (RCA) 

2 2 Blue Comets/Original Hits No. 2 — The Blue Comets (CBS) 

3 3 Rolling Stones Golden Album— The Rolling Stones (London) 

4 5 The Walker Brothers Story— The Walker Brothers (Philips) 

5 4 The Tigers On Stage — The Tigers (Polydor) 


This 

Week 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 


Last LOCAL 

Week 

1 Love You Tokyo — Los Primos (Crown) 

3 Nijiiro No Mizuumi — Akiko Nakamura (King) 

2 Sekai Wa Futari No Tameni — Naomi Sagara (Victor) 

4 Murasaki-No Yoake — Hibari Misora (Columbia) 

8 Maboroshi-No Amalilia — Yuzo Kayama (Toshiba) 

6 Kuchinashi-No Ballad— Kazuo Funaki (Columbia) 

10 Sakariba Blues — Shinichi Mori (Victor) 

5 Aino Kokoro— Akira Fuse (King) 

7 Inochi Karetemo— Shinichi Mori (Victor) 

— Namida-No Kawakumade — Sachiko Nishida (Polydor) 


This 

Week 

1 

2 

3 

4 
a 

6 


8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 


Last INTERNATIONAL 

Week 

1 Kimi-Dakeni Ai-O — The Tigers (Polydor) Publisher /Wantanabe 

2 I Only Live Twice — The Folk Crusaders (Capitol) Publisher/ Art 
Music 

3 Itsumademo Dokomademo— The Spiders (Philips) Publisher/New 
Orient 

6 Otome-No Inori — Jun Mayuzumi (Capitol) Publisher/ Ishihara 

4 Theme Of The Monkees — The Monkees (RCA Victor) Sub- 
Publisher / Shinko 

7 Daydream Believer — The Monkees (RCA Victor) Sub-Publisher/ 
Shinko 

5 Okay — Dave Dee, Dozy, Mick & Tich (Philips) Sub-Publisher/ 
A. Shroeder 

9 Hello Good-Bye — The Beatles (Odeon) Sub-Publisher /Toshiba 

10 Sukidakara— The Village Singers (CBS) Publisher/Top 

8 Kitaguni No Futari — The Blue Comets (CBS) Publisher/ 
Wantanabe 

— Taiyo Yaro — The Bunnys (Seven Seas) Publisher /Seven Seas 

— Machikutabireta Nichiyobi — Vicky (Philips) Sub-Publisher/ 
Shinko 

14 Wasureenu Kimi — The Tempters (Philips) Publisher/— 

11 L’Amour Est Bleu— Vicky (Philips) Sub-Publisher /Shinko 

13 Okay — -The Carnabeats (Philips) Sub-Publisher/A. Shroeder 



Charley Pride also dropped by to say hi. He followed George Hamilton IV 
into the Horseshoe. This was Pride’s first Canadian appearance, and RCA’s 
promo man Ed Preston went on an all-out promotion which resulted in radio 
I and TV interviews. This added exposure has chalked up extra sales for Pride’s 
I three albums plus extensive air-play on his single “The Day The World Stood 
j Still.” From here. Pride is off on a tour in Germany. 

i Phil Anderson, Arc Sound’s President, has announced, that Arc received two 
of the three Canadian Awards at MIDEM. The award for the top-selling female 
vocalist went to Catherine McKinnon, and the second award was for the top- 
selling vocal group which was picked up by Arc’s Abbey Tavern Singers.. 
Gordon Lightfoot, on United Artists, received the third award for best Cana- 
dian performer. 

Jerry Renewych of Southern Music Publishing in Montreal writes that Scep- 
tre’s latest on the Allied label, “Something’s Coming Along,” will be released 
on the Calla label in the U.S. A release in the U.K. is expected by mid-Febni- 
ary. 

Hank Secord, of CFCW in Camrose, Alberta, informs Cash Box we were in 
error on our year-end summary which stated that CFGM was the only twenty- 
four hour country station in Canada. This is not so. CFCW is the twenty-four 
hour country station in the West. 



THE PAUSE THAT REFRESHES— At the recent presentation of Coca-Cola 
Ltd.’s premium album releases of Canadian talent, shown listening to the com- 
pleted disks at Toronto’s Hallmark Studio, are: (from the left) Ray Chaput 
and Bill Richardson of Coca-Cola Ltd.; Lori Brunner, Canadian rep for Cash 
Box; Paul White, A&R man for (Canadian) Capitol; Jack Richardson, broad- 
cast producer for the McCann Erikson Ad Agency; and Ben McPeek, president 
of Nimbus 9 Productions. 


NEW ENGLAND? — Polydor Records threw a party for their top selling 
group, the Bee Gees, to celebrate two million sales of their “Massachusettes,” 
single where the English group was duly presented with two gold disks. Per- 
sonnel from DGG flew in for the occasion and are shown here (from the left): 
Heinz Brand (Frankfurt), Bee Gee Colin Peterson, Willy Protschel (Munich), 
Karl Von Albedyll (Hamburg),, Richard Busch (managing director of the 
German division of DGG), Bee Gees Robin and Maurice Gibb and Vince 
Melouney, Karl Tuch (Essen), and (seated) Bee Gee Barry Gibb. 


•Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


75 



Ca, shBoK HoUand 


Last week Bovema started a “Love action” concerning' the 50 guitars of 
Tommy Garrett. For dealers, a special contest is being held and special pro- 
motion material sent to press, radio and television. At the same time Bovema 
released a magnificent series of not less than seven Tommy Garrett albums 
certain to be a success in Holland. 

■ Every Dutchman is anxious to hear the new Buffoons single. This amazing 
group succeeded in becoming one of the top groups of Holland thanks to their 
perfect close-harmony singing. “Maria” (from West Side Story) is the A-side 
and on the flipside “It’s the End.” Top igroup of Bovema, the Cats, have a 
tremendous new single. They have chosen another David & Jonathan composi- 
tion called “Turn Around And Start Again.” 

loop Visser of Bovema released a Blue Note repertoire. Six great albums: 
“Adam’s Apple” by Wayne Shorter, “Mustang”/Donald Byrd, “A New Con- 
ception”/Sam River, “The Spoiler”/Stanley Turrentine, “Real McCoy”/McCoy 
Tyner and “Boss Horn”/Blue Mitchell. 

loop Visser again with an excellent release of Impulse on the Dutch market. 
A successful start of this label in the Gramophone house at Heemstede thanks 
to albums as Ayler’s “Live At The Village Vanguard,” “Impressions Of New 
York” of the Rolf and Joachim Quartet and a surprising debut of the guitar 
talent Mel Brown with “Chicken Fat.” Furthermore, a Clark Terry album 
called “It’s What’s Happenin’ The Varitone Sound” and “Mood Jazz” by Gabor 
Szabo in “The Socerer Gabor Szabo.” 

Gramophone House Bovema is proud to gather all the French chansonniers. 
This opportunity is the reason of starting a great “Chanson Action” with 
twelve fabulous albums. Every album a jewel on his own as e.g. Gilbert 
Becaud, Sacha Distel, Georges Chelon, Anne Vanderlove, Enrico Macias, Leo 
Ferre, Nicoletta, Frank Pourcel, Mireille Mathieu, Huges Aufray, Charles 
Aznavour and Raymond Lefevre. 

Bovema introduces the Arhoolie label which includes many great original 
blues recordings. The first six records, released this week, include Big Mama 
Thornton, Jesse Fuller, Lightin’ Sam Hopkins, Sonny Boy Williamson and 
Memphis Minnie. The Dutch jazz magazines gave very good reviews. 

This week Negram-Delta released a brand new single by the Motions 
featuring Rudy Bennett. The A-side is written by Peter Stirling and is titled 
“You’re My Adee.” The record is expected to enter the top ten within a short 
time. 

In February, Negram-Delta is releasing the third LP by West Coast group 
Love. The Elektra album titled “Forever Changes” is already highlighted 
in the local pop papers. Another magnificent LP to be released the same month 
is “The Ressurection Of Pigboy Crabshaw” by the enlarged Paul Butterfield 
Blues Band. Also on Elektra, “Love Me Two Times” by the Doors, currently 
receiving lots of airplay. 

At the end of February, Negram-Delta will issue the first album on the 
Tee Set Records label : “Join The Tee Set” by Dutch R & B group no. 1 the 
Tee Set, currently riding high in the Dutch top ten with their own composition 
“Tea Is Famous,” “What Can I Do” and “Colours Of The Rainbow,” also own 
compositions of the group, will be released by Pye in England this month. 
Also on Tee Set Record a new record by group Mack, “Do It Another” and 
“Little Lovely Honey.” 

Further releases into the single field include this week “Pata Pata” by 
Senor Soul and “Baby You’ve Got It” by Brenton Wood, both on Double Shot/ 
Havoc; “Unchained Melody” by David Garrick on Pye; “Can I Get There by 
Candlelight” by Major Minor’s David McWilliams and “Never Wed An Old 
Man When You’re Young, Maid” by the Irish Dubliners. 

The Acta label of Dot records is represented by Negram for only a few 
months now and already “Bend Me, Shape Me,” is giving the company the 
chance of making this label a very important one for Holland. Great expecta- 
tions for this item. 

The “Ballad Of Bonnie & Clyde,” for which Bospel Music has the rights 
for Holland and the other Benelux countries, has been recorded within 10 
days by Conny van Bergen on Imperial, Mendel and Mendel on Omega, and 
the Dutch Swing College Band on the Philips label. 



MERCURY’S FREEDOM — Jonathan Weston’s group Freedom, founded by two 
ex^members of Procol Harum, has just signed a long term, world-wide recording 
contract with Mercury Records, which is distributed by Philips. Ex-Weston, who 
will produce all of Freedom’s records is seen here signing an exclusive produc- 
tion contract with Mercury. His New Breed firm will find and record new acts 
for Mercuiy. He flies to Rome later this month to negotiate for Freedom’s 
“Attraction” flick (produced by Dino di Laurentiis) to be shown in the United 
Kingdom. Shown (from the left): Mercury president, Irving Green; Lou 
Reisner, Mercury’s international head; and Jack Gould' of Philips; Jonathan 
Weston is seated. 



WORLD WIDE G ATHERIN G — This group photo shows the guests (represent- 
ing nearly 30 countries) and the leading execs of Deutsche Grammophon 
Gesellschaft MBH. The occasion was the international DGG convention on Jan. 
15-16. 


Germany 


Midem is behind us and the swingingest week of the record industry year 
is over. The basic opinion of the Germany record industry execs was that 
Midem is an absolute “must” and even more participation can be expected 
next year. One thing for sure. The activity at the conference was so hectic 
that it was impossible to really take the time to start and finish a “big deal.” 
Deals were started that will be finished later, and deals were sewed up that 
were started earlier. Midem is a week-long record industry party, but it’s a party 
that no one in this business can afford to miss. 

The Deutsche Grammophon Gesellschaft, which is celebrating their 70th 
birthday this year, saw their baby sister company Polydor take all the apples 
for the start of the new year. In London, the Bee Gees received a golden disc 
for a million sales of “Massachusetts” with a special 7 foot statue also awarded 
the group for the international meeting held in Hannover. Germany alone 
accounted for over 450,000 records of Massachusetts sold. That’s just the 
start! German star Roy Black who celebrated his 25th birthday on January 
25th picked up his first gold record for the song “Ganz in Weiss” (All In 
White) which passed the million sales mark. The young star has sold over 
3 million records since his start in 1965 and has picked up a stack of awards 
too long to mention. 

Meanwhile back at Midem, Polydor was picking up the German chips with 
the male award for this country going to their artist Freddy Quinn and distaff 
honors to Wencke Myhre also on Polydor. 

Gerig Music reports that the first German recordings from “Dr. Dolittle” 
have been made by Paul Kuhn for Electrola. 

Hans Blume of Hansa Records called to say that the Hollies jumped to 
Germany for a quick TVer for their present hit “Dear Eloise.” 

Mr. Acker Bilk is doing a 14 day tour of Germany from February 1st to the 
14th. He’ll do 13 cities and concerts during that period. 

The end of February brings a top beat tour featuring the fabulous Bee Gees 
and Procol Harum. The two top groups will do a 12 city jaunt. The Bee Gees 
will be accompanied by a 17 string orchestra from England. 

Berlin film producer Herbert Maris has formed his own publishing and 
record production firm. The production will be distributed by Ariola. The first 
four artists recorded by Maris Musik are Clarissa May, Norman Ascot, Pete 
& Tina Rainford and the Maris Singers. Two film works are now being made. 

Teldec gave a press reception in Munich for Leontyne Price who was making 
her first appearance here. The RCA Victor star sang to a standing room only 
crowd and had terrific reviews in the press. 

Publisher-producer Hans Wewerka is working hard on the Syn and their 
recording of “Flowerman.” 

American Charlie Hickman has taken over the “Hits Of The Week” show on 
RIAS Radio in Berlin. Fred Ignor lead the program for 15 years. The show 
is one of the most popular on Berlin radio. 

“Tom Jones came, sang and won.” That’s what Teldec had to report about 
the fabulous singer who hit Germany for the first time. 40 journalists gathered 
together in Munich’s Bayerische Hof Hotel for the press conference for the 
star. Tom was here for a TV shot and an appearance at the “Bambi” film 
awards, Germany’s equivalent to the “Oscar” and for the Bal Pare Ball which 
followed Other top stars appearing were the Supremes and Merielle Mathieu. 

Teldec has sewed up rights for the stage version of “Fiddler On The Roof” 
in German which opens on February 1st in Hamburg. 

Annelies Schilling has taken over for radio promotion for Stigwood-Y askiel 
International. Daniela Holubowsky continues to head up the Public Relations 
Department. 

Aberbach Music is working hard on “Golden Boy” by Freddy Quinn, “The 
Day I Met Marie” in German and English by Cliff Richard, “In And Out Of 
Love” by Diana Ross & the Supremes and a hatful of German hit goodies. 

Ella Fitzgerald is swinging through Germany with a 6 city tour 
; *■ That’s it for this week in Germany. 


76 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 





CoshBojc JHusiraiia 


Local outfit the Groop is now on its way to England as part of its prize for 
winning the 3UZ Battle of The Sounds last year. We understand that the 
Groop’s big hit single “Woman, You’re Breaking Me” is set for release in both 
England and the United States by CBS. The Groop is booked for personal 
appearances in London, and with any sort of luck could break through to the 
international big time. Good luck Fellas! ! 

Riding along nicely at the number one position across the nation is local 
boy Johnny Farnham with his “Sadie, The Cleaning Lady,” out for EMI’s 
Columbia label. The deck was produced by David Mackay who recently spent 
several days recording new material for Johnny at Bill Armstrong’s studio. 
The new single will come from these sides, as will Johnny’s first album. Charts 
for the session were done by Johnny Hawker, who recently returned home from 
a quick trip to England, Canada and the States. 

< Festival Records have moved to their new address which houses administra- 
tive offices, studios, warehouse and pressing plant. New mailing details for the 
company are as follows: Festival Records Pty. Ltd., 63 — 79 Miller Street, Pyr- 
mont. New South Wales, 2009, Australia. The phone number is the same at 
68-4021. 


Blind disc-jockey Grantley Dee has something of a first going for himself 
right now. Grantley is also a singer and a recording artist for the EMI group 
and has several hits to his credit. He now has his first album out for the 
■ HMV label — the set is simply entitled “Grantley Dee” and it carries a most 
effective cover for the occasion. Grantley is a disc-jockey with top-forty sta- 
tion 3AK. The comprehensive cover notes for the album were written by dee- 
jay Stan Rofe, who is with 3UZ . . . another top forty station. 

RCA are out with the sensational new American smash for Ed Ames, “Who 
Will Answer?” In the past this type of record hasn’t been widely accepted in 
this country, so it will be interesting to see if Ed Ames can attain similar 
action here to what he has in the United States. The RCA boys are making 
an all-out drive to establish the record. And Associated Music, the RCA pub- 
lishing subsid here who handle the local copyright to the song, will be doing 
likewise. 


New local outfit called the Heart And Soul have their first single out on the 
Festival label with “Who Could Be Loving You” and “She’s Got The Time.” 
Copyright in both sides is controlled by Belinda Music. 


Australia's Best Sellers 


1 Sadie, The Cleaning Lady (Johnny Farnham — Columbia) Tu-Con Music. 

2 Hello Goodbye (The Beatles — Parlophone) Northern Songs. 

3 Daydream Believer (The Monkees — RCA) Tu-Con Music. 

4 The Rain, The Park And Other Things (The Cowsills — MGM) J. Albert & 
Son. 

► 5 The Two Of Us (Tony Hatch & Jackie Trent — Astor) Leeds Music. 

6 You’ve Not Changed (Sandie Shaw — Astor) Chappell & Co. 

7 All My Love (Cliff Richard — Columbia) Castle Music. 

8 Baby You Got It (Bren ton Wood — Festival) 

9 Judy (Elvis Presley — RCA) Progressive Music. 

10 The Last Waltz (Englebert Humperdinck — Decca) J. Albert & Son. 

Asterick indicates locally produced record. 


Sweden's Best Sellers 

1 

1 

5 

Lyckliga gatan (11 Ragazzo della Via Gluck) (Anna-Lena 
Lofgren /Metronome) Sonet Music AB, iSweden 

2 

2 

8 

Hello Goodbye (Beatles/Parlophone) Sonora Musikforlags 
AB, Sweden 

3 

4 

3 

World (Bee Gees /Polydor) Sonora Musikforlags 
AB, Sweden 

4 

7 

2 

Spicks And Specks (Bee Gees /Polydor) Belinda 
(Scandinavia) AB, Sweden 

5 

3 

6 

Magical Mystery Tour (Beatles/Parlophone) Sonora 
Musikforlags AB, Sweden 

6 

6 

2 

*Hambostinta i kort-kort (Mona Wessman/RCA Victor) 
Sonora Musikforlags AB, Sweden 

7 

5 

9 

*Maria Therese (Robban Broberg/ Columbia) Edition Odeon, 
Sweden 

8 

__ 

1 

Cara Mia (Shanes /Columbia) 

9 

10 

6 

Daydream Believer (Monkees/RCA Victor) Screen Gems 
Musikforlag AB, Sweden 

10 


1 

*Far jag folja dej en bit pa vagen (Sten & Stanley /RCA 
Victor) 

*Local copyright. 


K - 

Germany Record Mir's Sales 


*11 
!«• 2 2 

3 3 

I 

*4 — 

5 8 

*6 — 

I 

i# 7 6 

1 

. 8 10 

r 9 7 

I 10 — 

I 


3 World — The Bee Gees — Polydor — Abigail Music/R. 
Slezak 

14 Massachusetts — The Bee Gees — Polydor — Rudolf Slezak 
Music 

8 Schiwago-Melodie — Maurice Jarre — MGM — Hans 
Gerig Music 

1 Mama — Heintje — Ariola — Hans Sikorski Music 

8 Hello, Goodbye — The Beatles — Odeon — Northern Songs/ 
Rolf Budde Music 

1 Doch Dann Kamst Du (But Then You Came Along) — 
Ronny — Telefunken > — Edition Maxim 

9 Morning Of My Life — Esther & Abi Ofarim — Philips — 
Hans Sikorski Music 

9 The Letter — The Box Tops — CBS — Belmont Music 
23 San Francisco — Scott McKenzie — CBS — Edition Intro/ 
Meisel 

1 2000 Lightyears From Home — The Rolling Stones — 

Decca — Hans Gerig Music 
* Original German Copyright 


j Cash Box — February 10, 1968 



Scandinavia 


Denmark 

Ravi Shankar appeared in a Danish TV show last Jan. 26th, with EMI fol- 
lowing up with a special campaign on the four stereo LP albums available. 
As from the beginning of this year, EMI here added the following new labels 
those already handled in Denmark: fouesway. Impulse, Music Guild, Tangerine, 
Westminster and Whitehall. Also from the start of 1968, Ole Bredahl joined 
EMI as producer — he already had a recording contract with the company, 
known as Sir Henry in Sir Henry & His Butlers. 

Sys Gregers and Gustav Winckler has done “Romeo og Juliet” in Danish 
for Sonet. The tune, recorded in German by Peggy March on RCA Victor, this 
week holds the second position at the charts here. 

Morks Musikforlag handles “Judy In Disguise” for Scandinavia, Knut Mork, 
head of the company, reports to Cash Box, Morks has also published a folio 
with five tunes by Shel Silverstein, all recorded here by Povl Dissing at Sonet. 
The tunes are “Boa Constrictor,” “Lemmebesomethin’,” “The Mermaid,” “Ma- 
matschi,” and “25 Minutes to Go.” The latter five tunes are handled fo7 
Scandinavia by Musikforlaget Essex AB in Stockholm. 

Peter Belli, Triola recording artist, has done “If I Were I Carpenter” b.w 
“Go With Me.” 


Finland 

Latest releases from Scandia-Musiikki Oy include Reijo Taipale with two 
local tangos, Teijo Joutsela with two local tunes, Reijo Viita with two loca/ 
tangos, and single with Eija Merila and Four Cats with Marion Rung and 
Four Cats on the flip side, also local tunes. Releases also include two EPs in 
the “4 iskelmaa” (Four Songs) serial. All on Scandia. 


Norway 

“Tin Soldier” with Small Faces on Immediate appeared at the charts her& 
the other week, unfortunately listed in this column as “The Soldier.” The 
record is still among the 20 most sold here. 

A/S Nor-Disc looks like having a coming top seller with their just released 
“Spicks And Specks” with Bee Gees on Polydor. 


Sweden 


Anders Holmstedt has been appointed head of the Scandinavian EMI activi. 
ties. He just returned to his desk from a business visit at the EMI head- 
quarters in London. 

Thore Ehrling Musik AB is handling “I’m Coming Home” here, now on 
the charts in various countries, recorded by Tom Jones at Decca. A local 
Swedish recording with Claes Goran Hedstrom on RCA Victor is already avail- 
able. A local tune with good sales appeals is “I manga tusen ar” (During 
Thousands of Years), composed by Staff an Ehrling, son of Thore Ehrling, head 
of the publishing house. The latter has been recorded here by Mona Wessman 
on RCA Victor, Other tunes from the same publisher include “If I Were A 
Rich Man” from “Fiddler On The Roof,” a musical scheduled to open in 
Sweden the end of February. “Ode To Billy Joe” with Swedish lyrics (“Jon 
Andreas visa”) by Olle Adolphson, and a number of tunes from the motion 
picture “Camelot,” recently opening in Stockholm. 


Denmark's Best Sellers 

This 

Last 

Weeks 

on 

Week Week 

Charts 

1 

1 

7 

Hello Goodbye (Beatles/Parlophone) Multitone A/S, Den- 
mark 

2 

2 

6 

Romeo and Julia (Peggy March/RCA Victor) Sweden 
Music AB, Sweden 

3 

5 

5 

Sussy Moore (Lollipops/Polydor) No publisher 

4 

7 

4 

World (Bee Gees/Polydor) Dacapo Musikforlag, Denmark 

5 

6 

5 

Daydream Believer (Monkees/RCA Victor) Screen Gems 
Musikforlag AB, Sweden 

6 

4 

12 

*Tryllesangen (Pulse Helmuth/ Polydor) Multitone A/S, 




Denmark 

7 

8 

2 

La Bostella (Melody Mixers/Polydor) 

8 

3 

6 

Magical Mystery Tour (Beatles/Parlophone) Multitone 
A/S, Denmark 

9 

— 

1 

Den sidste vals (The Last Waltz) (Poul Rudi/RCA Victor) 
Wilhelm Hansen, Musik-Forlag, Denmark 

10 

10 

13 

Massachusetts (Bee Gees/Polydor) Dacapo Musikforlag, 
Denmark 

Norway's Best Sellers 


This Last Weeks on 
Week Week Charts 

112 Lyckliga gatan (II Ragazzo della Via Gluck) (Anna-Lena 
Lofgren/ Metronome) Sonet Music AB, Sweden 
Hello Goodbye (Beatles /Parlophone) iSonora Musikforlags 
AB, Sweden 

Under ditt parasoll (Sven-Ingvars/Svensk-American) Seven 
Brothers Music Inc./Edition Odeon, Sweden 
Onskebrunnen (Sven-Ingvars/Svensk-American) Seven 
Brothers Music Inc. /Edition Odeon, Sweden 

5 5 7 Magical Mystery Tour (Beatles/Parlophone) Sonora Musik- 

forlags AB, Sweden 

6 4 7 Daydream Believer (Monkees/RCA Victor) Screen Gems 

Musikforlag AB, Sweden 

7 9 12 The Last Waltz (Engelbert Humperdinck /Decca) Wilhelm 

Hansen, Musik-Forlag, Denmark 

8 8 2 Susannah’s Still Alive (Dave Davies/Pye) 

9 — 1 Walk Away Renee (Four Tops/Tamla-Motown) 

10 7 12 Du ar den ende (Romance d’amore) (Lill Lindfors/Polydor) 

Sonora Musikforlags AB, Sweden 


8 


14 


77 


1 


<lcM" 


mmM 

CashBox 

WWW 

N^it^ 


Editorial 




OPENING UP 


N 


The simple fact that the majority of operators today are 
carrying a tremendous, almost excessive debt to their 
distributors or local factoring houses, a debt built 
through the necessary but costly purchase of adequate, 
route equipment has raised many a bankers eye- 
brow and shut the vault on many an operator over the 
years. To be sure, the value of coin machine “paper” 
to local banks and finance firms varies considerably 
from town to town, country to country, state to state. 
Some metropolitan areas offer credit verging on carte 
blanche to operators interested in updating the route, 
based upon past performance of that local industry to 
make the debt good in the time alloted. Other regions 
find operators hard-pressed to raise finance at suitable 
interest from anyone but their territorial distributing or- 
ganizations, and from these principally because their 
franchise agreement with a national machine factory 
allows their dealing with virtually any banking house in 
the nation. Therefore, it is not unusual that the average 
operator looks to his distributor to provide financing for 
the machines he buys. It is also apparent that the choice 
of music and amusement machines he buys is greatly 
determined by his credit standing at a given distribut- 
ing organization, in many cases, more so than the 
quality and brand preference he attaches to a parti- 
cular make of machine. 

But there’s always two sides to every coin and an op- 
erator leaves himself wide open to exhorbitant interest 
rates from some distributors is he spreads paper all 
over town. A distributor who takes advantage of an op- 
erator who’s spread so thin by robbing from Peter to 
give to Paul encourages such irresponsible finagling 
and should be prepared to take the consequences when 

V 


he’s hung for the debt. j 

What is desirable and actually necessary in today’s j 
sophisticated business world is an updating of every , 
operator’s accounting methods. Many operators keep 
close tabs on their books. They know what they can 
spend, how much they can safely borrow and still show 
a profit, how to adequately depreciate their equipment 
over the short or long term and thereby take advantage 
of all the financial benefits available to plot a consistent 
picture of profitable growth. Sadly, many of our opera- 
tors are as sophisticated about their bookkeeping as the '' 
dirty deck of of lOU’s in their pockets. It is to this seg- 
ment of the trade that we plead for closer attention to 
and scrutiny of their receipts and expenditures. 

Most operating firms use the services of an ac- 
countant but how many of those accountants are close 
enough or care enough to help the operator plot the 
proper course of financial activity. How many bother to 
detail their current liabilities, term liabilities, current 
assets, capital, cash, chart the course in depreciation, 
let the operator know the right time to buy a new phono- 
graph or table — even when he might not need one — or 
refrain from incurring further debt, even when the im- 
pulse to snap up a new location might be irresistable. 

And here’s a real crusher! How many operators are 
willing to show their distributors their annual state- 
ments, even when it might generously raise their credit 
and substantially lower the interest. Too much secrecy ’’ 
clouds the coin machine industry’s books, what books 
exist. It’s traditional, it’s “safe,” it’s also ridiculous if 
“bearing your financial soul” could help you out of a I 
financial hole. 


Triangle Stockholders Vote Formal Approval of Rowe Acquisition 


NEWARK, N. J. — Shareholders of 
Triangle Conduit & Cable Co, Inc., at 
a special meeting in Whippany, ap- 
proved Triangle’s acquisition of the 
Rowe Manufacturing Division of Can- 
teen Corporation, according to Carl S. 
Menger, chairman of the board and 
president. 

Shareholders also approved an in- 
crease in Triangle’s authorized num- 
ber of shares of capital stock to 
3,500,000 from 2,500,000 shares. 

The acquisition. Triangle’s first ma- 
jor diversification into the consumer 
products field, calls for Canteen Cor- 
poration to receive from Triangle $24 
million in cash and $4 million in con- 
vertible subordinated notes for Rowe. 

Menger said that the newly-acquired 
business will be known as Rowe Inter- 


national, Inc., and that Triangle will 
operate Rowe as a wholly-owned sub- 
sidiary. He added that Jack D. 
Harper, president of Rowe, will con- 
tinue in that capacity along with the 
other members of Rowe’s current man- 
agement team. 

Menger said that he was “gratified 
at the shareholders’ approval of the 
acquisition” and said that Rowe rep- 
resents “a springboard for the con- 
sideration for other possible moves 
into related areas of the consumer 
products field in the future.” 

He added that the acquisition is 
in keeping with Triangle’s policy to 
achieve desirable diversification in 
areas of strong profit and growth 
potential, thus in the long run dim- 
inishing the company’s reliance on the 


cyclical nature of its historical opera- 
tions.” 

Rowe, with annual sales in excess of 
$40 million, is one of the country’s 
largest manufacturers of a broad line 
of vending machine equipment, coin- 
operated phonographs and background 
music systems. Its headquarters and 
main production facilities are in Whip- 
pany, N. J. Rowe also has another 
plant in Grand Rapids, Michigan. 

Three Executive Promotions 
Also Announced 

Menger also announced three ex- 
ecutive promotions during the special 
meeting. 

Judd E. Winick has been appointed 
vice president — corporate planning; 
Robert C. Hawkins has been appointed 


vice president — corporate marketing, , 
and Robert V. Quindlen has been ap- 
pointed vice president — manufactur- I 
ing. Electrical Division. I 

Winick succeeds Harry H. Martin, ' 
who will assume the responsibilities of j 
a newly-created position to be an- 
nounced shortly. Hawkins will have 
full responsibility for all activities of 
the Triangle Marketing Division, as i 
well as complete authority for the 
coordination of its activities with 
those of the marketing organization 
of The Plastic Wire & Cable Corp- 
oration, a wholly-owned subsidiary of 
Triangle. Quindlen will be responsible 
for all operations in Triangle’s rod 
mill and wire and cable facilities in 
New Brunswick, N. J., steel operations 
(Continued at right) 


78 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


Harper Realigns Rowe Exec Force; 
J. Barton, Marcus Named V. P.’s 


S.C.C.O.A. Annual Brings ’Em Out; 
Garmon, Factory Reps Spark Gala 


COLUMBIA, S. CAEOLINA — “We 
had good attendance in spite of the 
flu bug which kept a good many away,” 
said Mrs. Erby Campbell, “About 
175+ operators, guests and their 
friends were in attendance.” 

West Columbia was swinging high 
during the Fifth Annual convention of 
the South Carolina Coin Operators 
Association, January 27-28th, at the 
Shrine Clul). Prominent coinbiz per- 
sonnel from all over the country was 
there. At the Saturday evening gala, 
the Dixie Cups of Bird Eecords en- 
tertained, (Chapel Of Love, Fame), 
Two Go-Go girls from Charleston was 
also on the slate of entertainment. As 
was. The Plaids Dance Band and well- 
known WDKW DJ, Charlie Walker, 
acting as master of ceremonies. 

Mrs. Campbell said, “We were sorry 
to hear that the MGM and Capitol 
records executives were unable to at- 
tend because of illness, also Eowe 
AMI’s Joe Barton, who was tied up 
in Louisville, Kentucky after the AMI 
distributor showing and could not 
make it to the affair.” 

The action started on Saturday 
morning at 10:00 with the the opening 
of exhibits where phonographs, games, 
pool tables, counter games, cars and 
trucks were on the viewing line. Then 
at 7:00 PM ‘Drinks for everyone’ at 
the cocktail hour! 

The buffet and dance began at 8:00 
PM and lasted ’til the wee hours of 
Sunday morning where everyone had 


to get up by 10:00 AM if they wanted 
to get a second look at the exhibits. 
By 1:00 PM, everyone’s headache was 
gone and just in time too, because it 
was time for the Luncheon and was 
everyone hungry! 

After the luncheon, the ladies and 
their women guests went on a tour of 
the famous Amsley House where they 
all had a good time as well as an in- 
on©# 

Speaking at the Sunday afternoon 
luncheon were newly elected MO A 
President, Billy Cannon of Haddon- 
field. New Jersey and MOA executive 
vice-president, Fred Granger. Cannon 
was the guest speaker. 

Other well known coin machine per- 
sonnel in attendance included: George 
Hincker of Eock-Ola Mfg. from Chi- 
cago, Eddie Frank of Jupiter Ent^ 
prises from Miami, Fla., Sol Lipkin, 
of American Shuffleboard from Union 
City, New Jersey, Lenny Schneller of 
U.S. Billiards from Amityville, N.Y., 
Larry Le Stourgeon of Le Stourgeon 
Distributors, George Happel of San- 
ders Dist. from Nashville, Tenn., and 
a “host of other wonderful i)eople,’' 
said Mrs. Campbell. Incidentally, Mrs, 
Campbell and her husband, own Un+ 
versal Vending Distributors, West, 
Columbia, and distribute the Jupiter 
line of phonographs. 

It was a grand time for all and you 
can bet that not a single person who. 
attended, regretted it. Well done, Op.-^ 
erators of South Carolina! 


Unique, Gravity-Operated Sorter Released 


WHIPPANY, N.J.— Jack Harper, 

president of Eowe Manufacturing, has 
announced the realignment of certain 
corporate duties of some top level ex- 
ecutives in the phonograph, vending 
and background music manufacturing 
complex, to provide, as he stated, “in- 
creased effectiveness and new opportu- 
nities for personal development.” 

Those executive changes and as- 
signments effective by the time the 
announcement was issued, include: 

1. The naming of Alvin Schaffer as 
vice president for corporate planning. 
“A1 has demonstrated outstanding 
managerial competence as plant man- 
ager in Whippany and will bring both 
broad experience and superior organi- 
zational talents to his new assign- 
ment,” the president declared. 

2. John Moyer is appointed to the 
newly-created post of vice president 
for manufacturing, with overall re- 
sponsibility for both Grand Eapids 
and Whippany facilities. “John has an 
excellent engineering background, a 
proven record of unusual administra- 
tive abilities as plant manager in 
Grand Eapids and is highly regarded 
as a production expert within our in- 
dustry,” Harper stated. 

3. Eichard Mueller has been as- 
signed the position of vice president 
for engineering. All research and de- 
velopmental engineering for the com- 
pany will be coordinated under his di- 
rection. “Dick, who has spent the 
greater part of his career in this area 
of business, has many industry firsts 
to his credit,” said Harper. “This as- 
signment promises to be one of the 



Eobert Milne 


TOEONTO, Ont. — Eobert J. Milne, a 
native of Montreal, has been appoint- 
ed resident representative in Quebec 
and the maritime provinces for Na- 
tional Eejectors of Canada Limited, 
a subsidiary of National Eejectors, 
Inc., it was announced recently by 
H. F. (Hugh) Sackett, NEI’s director 
of marketing. 

Milne will be responsible for sales 
and customer service activities. He 
previously had served as general man- 
ager of Eema Eefrigei’ation Co., Mon- 
treal, a distributor of vending ma- 


TRIANGLE 

(continued) 

of Glen Dale, W. Va., and marking 
inks and coatings, also in New 
Brunswick. Winick will report to the 
office of the president; both Hawkins 
and Quindlen will report to Leonard 
C. Marsac, vice president — adminis- 
tration. 


most far-reaching in terms of future 
growth and development for our com- 
pany.” 

4. Joe Barton has been named vice 
president for domestic sales. “This is 
in recognition of the diligence, loyalty 
and overall effectiveness he has 
brought to the directing of sales ef- 
forts for our company during the past 
several years,” Harper stated. 

5. Jerry Marcus has become vice 
president, treasurer with overall re- 
sponsibility for all fiscal matters, ac- 
counting and record-keeping for Eowe. 
“Jerry has demonstrated a high degree 
of financial acumen. Excellent admin- 
istrative abilities and a better-than- 
average capacity for handling a wide 
variety of assignments,” Harper de- 
clared. 

6. Marvin Chaban has joined Eowe 
as secretary and general counsel. “In 
his previous position as Chief patent 
attorney for Canteen,” Harper stated, 
“Marv has acquired a sound insight 
into the affairs of our organization 
and we anticipate he will contribute 
materially to our continued growth.” 

Harper concluded his announcement, 
saying : “It is my sincere hope that all 
employees join me in offering con- 
gratulations to these men and in 
pledging them our complete coopera- 
tion in the performance of their new 
duties.” 


chines and commercial refrigeration 
equipment. 

Sackett said, “We are pleased to 
have Bob Milne join the NEI organi- 
zation, and we are confident that his 
experience and familiarity with the 
Canadian vending industry will be an 
important asset to our growing Ca- 
nadian activities.” 

National Eejectors recently an- 
nounced a major expansion of its 
Canadian operations with the opening 
of a production plant at Toronto, Ont. 
The facility manufactures the firm’s 
versatile, new 81-15 coin selectors 
which are designed to accept Canada’s 
proposed pure nickel coins as well as 
existing Canadian and United States 
coinage. 

NEI has had sales and service op- 
erations in Canada since 1953 and was 
an early member of the Canadian 
Automatic Merchandising Association 
(CAMA). The firm also is a member 
of the CAMA Coinage Committee and 
is an associate member of the Ca- 
nadian Soft Drink Association. 

National Eejectors, Inc., a subsidi- 
ary of UMC Industries, Inc., has 
pioneered major advances in money 
validating and handling equipment for 
the vending industry since 1935 when 
it introduced the first truly success- 
ful slug rejector. These advances have 
played a fundamental part in the 
growth of automatic merchandising. 

Today, the NEI organization is in- 
ternational in scope. In the United 
States and Canada, the firm’s exten- 
sive field force includes representa- 
tives in seven area offices and 20 re- 
gional locations. 

In addition to the new National 
Eejectors of Canada plant at Toronto, 
the firm currently has manufacturing 
operations in both the United States 
and Europe. Its two plants in the 
United States are located in St. Louis, 
Mo., and in Hot Springs, Ark. The 
overseas operation is National Ee- 
jectors, G.m.b.H., of West Germany, 
with a plant at Buxtehude, near Ham- 
burg. Sales offices are maintained in 
London, England; Paris, France; and 
Milan, Italy. 



Nadex Coin Sorter automatically sorts, 
routes and stacks coins all by gravity 
flow. 


BUFFALO, N.Y. — At long last, 
“someone has come up with a fast 
foolproof, inexpensive coin sorter.” It 
is called the Nadex Coin Sorter, and 
is the invention of Eonald C. Gdans- 


ki, a young Canadian-bom , former 
high school teacher of English. 

The Nadex Coin Sorter works en- 
tirely by gravity. Its only moving 
parts are the coins themselves. It can 
sort, stack and count up to 300 coins 
a minute. 

Molded of durable plastic and shaped 
like a retangular tray, the device is 
28 inches long, 8 inches wide and 1 % 
inches deep. 

To operate, it is set up at an angle 
and the coins are poured in at the top. 
As they flow downward in a winding 
path, the various denominations are 
automatically diverted into separate 
routes and end up neatly stacked in 
calibrated slots that indicate the 
count. 

Hailed as the “world’s simplesf* 
coin sorter, the new product has a 
built-in trough at the bottom to make 
it easy to wrap the coins in tubes or 
flat paper wrappers. 

The secret of the Nadex Coin Sorter 
is in the precision-engineered contours 
and elevations that direct the coins 
to the proper stack. 

“Priced at under $30, it is capable 
of doing everything that units selling 
for $300 can do,” Gdanski said in an 
interview. 

Distribution is being handled by 
Nadex Industries of Buffalo, New 
York. 


Merchandisers Handbook Ho. 24 

We found a terrific idea in the pages of “World’s Fair,” the 
trade newspaper for the British coin biz. It read like this: “Plas- 
tic door seals originally produced for fixing to car doors in order 
to make them airtight and waterproof, are said to be ideal for 
keeping the interior of jukebox cabinets completely free from 
exterior dirt, etc. The seals have a roughly U-shaped section and 
are attached to the inner side of the door so that the four strips 
used form a close fitting rectangle following the outer edges 
of it. When the door is closed the strip is compressed at ail 
points and an airtight enclosure achieved immediately.” This 
is an excellent idea for those of you who are experiencing diffi- 
culties with dirt getting into the mechanisms of your phono- 
graphs. Give it a try and see what happens! 


Milne Tops NRI Canadian Div. 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


79 



AMI Distribs Invade Louisville For New Phono Preview 



The Jam Handy Players sing of successful sales 
steps to “Rowe distrib” Paul Caplan (left). 


On the ‘Joey Barton Tonight Show’, Atlas Music 
reps talk with the host behind desk. (L to R) 
Stan Levin, Chuck Harper, Bill Phillips, Eddie 
Ginsburg and Joe Barton. 


The Trimount story is explained to Barton by reps 
of the New England distrib (L to R) Russ Eckels, 
Bob Bourque, Dave Riskin, Marshall Caras, Dan 
Brown, Bob Jones, Irv Margold and Barton. 


LOUISVILLE — A grand assemblage of 
■Rowe distributors and factory repre- 
sentatives, called for by the firm’s 
■president Jack Harper, gathered here 
in Louisville Jan. 25th and 26th for 
the premiere presentation of their new 
console phonograph, slated for trade- 
wide release the third week of Feb- 
ruary. 

The brand new music machine, 
wrapped in secrecy until its dramatic 
unveiling on the stage of the Louis- 
ville Convention Center Thursday af- 
ternoon, was analyzed in depth and 
detailed from stem to stern at follow- 
up meetings conducted by national 
sales manager Joe Barton, service su- 


pervisors Jim Abato and George Kler- 
sey. Grand Rapids engineer Roger 
Hendricks and others in the factory’s 
technical division. 

Such an exceptionally large number 
of distributor personnel converged on 
Louisville’s Stouffers Inn Wednesday 
evening, many had to check into the 
Sheraton Hotel and the Medical Center 
due to the overflow. 

Harper opened the proceedings 
Thursday morning with a keynote ad- 
dress, citing the success of his distrib- 
utor network, passing out compliments 
where due and urging the representa- 
tives onto greater sales in 1968 by 
effective merchandising of their new 



RECONDITIONED SPECIALS GUARANTEED 

IN STOCK— SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE 


BALLY 


WILLIAMS 


$150 

FOUR ROSES 

. .$135 

. 220 

JUMPIN' JACK 

, . 175 

. 215 

DOUBLE PLAY 

. . 210 

. 185 



. 210 

CHICAGO COIN 


. 205 

PAR GOLF 

. .$185 

. 210 

VARIETY ROLL DOWN 

. . 150 

. 250 

BIG HIT 

. . 105 

. 270 

ALL STAR BASEBALL 

. . 125 

. 240 

BIG LEAGUE 

. . 295 

. 250 

HULA HULA 

. . 345 


MIDWAY 

TROPHY GUN $215 MONSTER GUN $325 

RIFLE CHAMP GUN 255 MYSTERY SCORE 185 



Write for complete 1968 Catalog of 
Phonographs, Vending and Games. 
Bstablished 1934 


Cable: 
ATMUSIC— Chicago 


ATLAS MLSIC COMPAIY 


12122 N. WESTERN AVE., CHICAGO, ILL. 60647. ARmitage 6-5005| 


product line. National promotion man- 
ager and “master planner” Jim New- 
lander, together with Joe Barton, su- 
pervised a theatrical revue, staged 
by the Jam Handy Players, which 
presented the new phonograph with as 
much music, dance, patter and pomp 
as a Broadway musical. 

Farther along Thursday afternoon, 
a takeoff on NBC TV’s ‘Tonight’ show, 
featuring “Joey Barton,” was well 
received by the distribs in the audi- 
ence. This segment of the presenta- 
tion offered the success stories and 
sales techniques of several of Rowe’s 
key distributing organizations. Panel- 
ists on hand represented Atlas Music 
of Chicago, Trimount Automatic Sales 
of Boston, J & J Distributing of In- 
dianapolis and Bush International of 
Maimi. Lunch Thursday was served 
in the nearby Sheraton Hotel’s Grand 
Ballroom. Toward the close of the 
session, Rowe’s overseas division man- 
ager Paul Hunger described the unique 
coinage, import duties and other Euro- 
pean conditions which he must con- 
sider in effectively running his branch 
of operations. Hunger congratulated 
the engineering staff of Rowe for pro- 
viding his division with the products 
he’s used to great advantage in their 
consistent growth of European sales. 

A cocktail reception Saturday eve- 
ning, which offered the distributors 
their first close inspection of the new 
console, was followed by dinner and 
entertainment in the Stouffers banquet 
hall. Comic Joe Conte and lovely song- 
stress Harriet Blake starred. 

Sunday’s program cracked off at 
8:15 with breakfast, followed by a 
rigorous schedule of sales, financial 
and product sessions which continued 
throughout the day, only breaking 
for lunch. Joe Barton concluded the 
two-day event with a stirring speech 
on the profit potential that lay ahead. 
By the rousing applause of the assem- 
blage, the Rowe distributors have 
picked up the ball and will be running 
hard for the end zone in 1968. Selected 
regional showings of the new photo 
have begun by press time and opera- 
tors are urged to watch the mail for 
their invitations. 



President Jack Harper set the keynote 
theme at the start of two-day session. 



Promo ace Jim Newlander (left) takes 
some ribbing from comic Joe Conte at 
the banquet. 



Down to serious business with service exec George Klersey at the ‘Show and 
Tell’ technical session. The new phono’s features were delved into in detail. 








PhonoVue Has 4-Tops, 
Cowsills, 1910 Fruit- 
Gum Co. On Latest 


[\ 


fi 


WHIPPANY, N. J. — George Klersey, 
director of the Rowe AMI PhonoVue/ 
record pairings service for opera- 
tors of the AMI Music Merchant/ 
PhonoVue. The new matches are for 
the week ending February 10, 1968. 

“Walk Away Renee” by the Four 
Tops on Motown is matched with 
“Girl and Statue” (L-2905A), “Two 
Girls In Garden” (L-2905E), “Jukebox 
Party” (L-2908H) and “Feeling Blue” 
(L-2912N). 

“We Can Fly” by The Cowsills on 
MGM is matched with “Harem Slave 
Girl” (L-2912E), “The Body” (L- 
2911T) and “Montmartre Les Girls 
#1” (L-2906C). 

“Simon Says” by the 1910 Fruitgum 
Company” on Buddah is matched with 
“Pirate Wench” (L-2911N), “Buxom 
Blonde (L-2911X) and “Triple Strip” 
(L-2910K). 

“New Love” by The Fantastic John- 
ny C” on Jamie /Guy den is matched 
with “Shake, Swing and Roll” (L- 
2910R). 

“Lovey Dovey” by Otis and Carla 
on Stax goes with “Chiffon Baby” (L- 
2911E) 

“Oh, How It Hurts” by Barbara 
Mason on Artie is matched with 
“Gambling Ladies” (L-2909C). 


y 


r> 

, > 


'/ 


\ 



WW Special Showing 



Pic shows several guests that attended 
World Wide’s recent “special showing” 
of new line of vending equip. WW’s 
genial head, Nate Feinstein was on 
hand to greet the guests. 


G a twin Releases Six 
A & M Junior LP's 
Features Top Artists 

s. CHICAGO — Bob Garmisa, heading 
’ up the promotion of Garwin Sales’ 
Little LP product released six (6) new 
titles last week that are now avail- 
able to the trade thru their nearest 
one-stop of record outlet. 

; V A&M #1201 

Herbie Mann — “Glory Of Love” 

\ ‘Unchain My Heart,’ ‘House of the 
V Risin’ Sun,’ ‘Upa, Neguinho,’ ‘No Use 
Crying,’ ‘Hold On, I’m Cornin’ and 
f ‘Glory of Love.’ 

1 A&M #1202 

f- Tamba 4— “We And The Sea” 

‘lemanja,’ ‘We and The Sea,’ ‘Chant 
I '"of Ossanha’ and ‘Dolphin.’ 

A&M #1203 

Herb Alpert & TB — “Herb Alpert’s 

> ' Ninth” 

■/ ‘A Banda,’ ‘Bud,’ ‘Love So Fine,’ 
‘With A Little Help From My 
/ , Friends,’ ‘Cowboys and Indians’ and 
\ ‘Carmen.’ 

A&M #1204 

The Sandpipers — “Misty Roses” 

‘Cuando Sali De Cuba,’ ‘And I Love 
y Her,’ ‘Fly Me To The Moon,’ ‘Strange 
/ Song,’ ‘Misty Roses’ and ‘Daydream.’ 
^ A&M #1205 

Julius Weehter & The Baja Marimba 
^ Band — “Fowl Play” 

‘Fowl Play,’ ‘Windy,’ ‘Fiddler On 
The Roof,’ ‘Along Comes Mary,’ ‘Baja 
Humbug,’ and ‘The Look Of Love.’ 

, A&M #1206 

We Five — “Make Someone Happy” 

' ‘Let’s Get Together,’ ‘Make Some- 
f one Happy,’ ‘Somewhere,’ ‘The First 

> Time,’ ‘Our Day Will Come’ and ‘The 
Inch Worm.’ 

/- 

Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


JUKE BOX OPS' 

TOP lOO CHART GUIDE 


■nnnnniiiiiiiiiin^^ 

Hot Spot 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiH 

The End Of Our Road 

Gladys Knight & The Pips (Soul 35042) 


The Following Records, Selected from 

The CASH BOX TOP 100, 

Represent tunes and performances which 
appear to be especially suitable for music routes. 


WX)RDS 

tee Gees (Ateo 6548) 

HEY LITTLE ONE 

Gten Campbell (Capital 2076) 

I THANK YOU 

Sam & Dave (Stax 242) 

THE DOCK OF THE BAY 

Otis Redding (Volt 157) 

EVERYTHING THAT TOUCHES 
YOU 

Association (Warner Bros. 7163) 

GET OUT NOW 

Tommy James & Shondells (Roulette 7000) 

WALK AWAY RENEE 


HERE COMES THE RAIN, BABY 

Eddy Arnold (RCA 9437) 

JUST DROPPED IN 

First Edition (Reprise 0655) 

LOOK HERE COMES THE SUN 

Sunshine Company ( Imperial 66280) 

CAB DRIVER 

Milts Brothers (Dot 17041) 

* MEN ARE GETTIN' SCARCE 

Joe Tex (Dial 4069) 

* THE CLICK SONG NUMBER ONE 

Cher (Imperial 66282) 

* GOT WHAT YOU NEED 

Fantastic Johnny C 
(Phil LA. Of Soul 309) 


Four Tops (Motown 1119) 

HI HEEL SNEAKERS 

Elvis Presley (RCA 9425) 


LOVE IS BLUE 

Al Martino (Capitol 2102) 

(* indicates first week on chart) 




IS THE FAVORED 
AUDIO-VISUAL 
MOVIE MACHINE 

You can lease it for 
$20 a week, mini- 
mum 25 weeks, 
films included. You 
be the judge — try it 
before you buy it. 


Exclusive Rowe AMI Distributor 
Ea.Pa. • $, Jersey • Del. - Md. « D.C. 


i^inaiiiiiiMiimii 


8S$ N. BROAD ST.. PHILA.. PA. 19123 
Phone: (215) CEnter 2-2900 








' CABINET DESIGN 
WITH FLUORESCENT 
LIGHTED PLAYFIELD 


TWO PLAYER BASEBALL GAME 


AS regular AND NOM^'' 

ANIMATED BASE-RUNNING UNIT. 

VARIETY OF PITCHES (Fast, Curve & Knuckler) 

1. New Style Home Run Ramp. 

2. Make Left, Center & Right 
Home Runs for Special or Extra Inning. 

3. Grand Slam Home Run is a 
carry over feature from Game to Game. 

4. Grand Slam Home Runs 
Score Special or Extra Inning. 

5. Hit All Targets for Extra Inning. 

6. Score Special for High Scores. 

a. Stainless Steel Front Door and 
Side Molding. 

b. Plastic Laminate Playfield and 
Front Molding. . 

C. Optional — Single, Double or 
Triple Chutes. 

now delivering “• 

JOLLY ROGER . CORONADO B/A > ORION S/A 




EL.BCTnOINtlCS, INC. 

3401 NORTH CALIFORNIA AVENUF 


CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 60618 
CABLE ADDRESS WILC01N CHICAGO 

AVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY THROUGH YOUR WILLIAMS DISTRIBUTOR 


81 






Make Profits 

“bounce” 


Make Sales 

“jump 


IVs the all new 






Check these 
features 
and you’ll say 
"Kaye? 




Completely New Design! 

Features all Formica cabinet and top frame. 

Colorful 

Regulation size available in vibrant new colors 
Red & White - Blue & White 
Jumbo size available in teak 


Life Time Sturdy Construction 

Reinforced construction throughout, with 
3/4" natural slate top. Live metal bumpers 

An Operator’s Dream Come True. 

Completely new jam-proof and cheat-proof 
coin mechanism 

Fits Any Location 

Available in 56" X 40" regular size 
or 77" X 45" jumbo size 


Irutno IlCatig 


1 363 Prospect Place, Brooklyn N.Y. 11238 


( 212 ) STerling 3*1200 




Actives 

THE CHOICE FOR 

the Lowest 
Prices 

and 

Best Equipment 


ALWAYS 

Exclusive Gottlieb, Rock-Ola, Fischer and Chi- 
cago Coin Distributor for Eastern Pennsylvania, 
South Jersey and Delaware. 

ACTIVE Amusement Machines Co. 

666 No. Broad Street, Phila. 30, Pa. POplar 9-4495 
1101 Pittston Ave., Scranton 5, Penna. 


Dependabiiity 
You Can Count On 

— for the finest new and 
reconditioned equipment 

BANNER 

Specialty Company 

1213-31 N. 5th St. 1508 Fifth Ave. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

(215) 236-5000 (412) 471-1373 




I 


’Round the Route 


U 

V 


Eastern Flashes 

FOOD FOR THOUGHT— The labor 
scene in the big city last week saw 
a new price hike on the taxi meters, 
a “work slowdown” by the Sanitation 
Dept, (toward a pay rise), a strike by 
garage employees in Manhattan and 
the Bronx (and who knows what else 
by press time). Isn’t it time to give 
more serious consideration to two- 
for-a-quarter jukebox play? Isn’t it 
past time? 

NOTHING COULD BE FINER— In 
spite of an untimely flu bug which 
kept many a Carolina operator abed, 
Mrs. Erby Campbell and the staff of 
the iS.C.C.O.A. were most gratified by 
the superb turnout of over 175 ops, 
guests and factory and distributor 
reps on hand. Fine weather, good 
entertainment courtesy of Bird Rec- 
ords’ Dixie Cups and plenty of worth- 
while coin talk puts the big check 
mark next to another great S. C. an- 
nual. Uncle Sam’s Army Reserves 
kept us locked up Sat. but Mrs. 
Campbell was courteous enough to 
supply us with copy. 

BATTERUP — The baseball season, 
which traditionaly comes early in 
coinbiz, is off to a fine start with 
Williams’ exciting new ‘Ball Park’. 
Billy DeSelm says a lot of coin-grab- 
bing features have been socked into 
the game and he looks forward to 
fielding a long, long sales run . . . 
Harold Kaufman over in Brooklyn 
at Musical Distributors is getting his 
catchers mitt out to snatch up that 
soon-to-be-released ChiCoin baseball 
game. Samples should be arriving 
shortly and the great Kaufman has 
Miltie Tucker warming up in the bull 
pen ready to spread the good word 
throughout the Westchester and Rock- 
land terrains. 

STEPPING AHEAD — Under the 
“iStep Ahead’ banner. Jack Harper and 
Joe Barton opened the curtain on 
Rowe’s brand new console phono down 
at Louisville’s Convention Center last 
Jan. 25 & 26. Distribs and their reps 
on hand could easily be the largest 
gathering of its kind and the response 
was most enthusiastic. Several fea- 
tures on the new music maker, which 
the factory will announce in two 
weeks, are mighty creative and the 
distribs are indeed excited. We en- 
joyed many pleasant hours with the 
Runyon Sales crew, especially Benny 
Markowitz’ recollections of his great- 
est prizefights of the century, Joel 
Kleiman and Sam Cooper say Clare 
Wesley, newly installed branch man- 
ager at the K.C. sales office, is doing 
a splendid job. Also new to coinbiz 
(coming from the vacuum cleaner in- 
dustry) is J & J’s Bill Watson, who 
moved to the top slot at the Cincy 
office they acquired from Shaffer 
Dist. Tom Reed at Shaffer info’s 
Ed Shaffer suffered a broken leg after 
slipping on the ice out at the Colum- 
bus airport. More disheartening news 
came when Ed’s son was called away 
from the sales meet to join his Air- 
force Reserve unit which was activa- 
ted on the 25th. Big Harry Mosley 
from Roanoke Vending struggling 
along the hall at the Convention 
Center after too-few hours of sleep 
the night before. Really big Dean 
McMurdie in a mighty jovial mood 
Thurs. evening, discussing merits of 
the new console seen the first time 
that day. That genial ‘Canadian’ Syd 
Vertlieb, from Johnny Cooper’s Shel- 
don Sales Co., is pioneering the 
turtleneck fashion look along with 
Advance’s Pete Entringer. Makes 
things a mite easier, we must admit. 
Syd looks forward to Buffalo show- 
ings on new machine, saying it’s just 
what his customers need. Coinvet Si 
Wolfe from Bush Int’l. had to drag 
out his overcoat for first time in two 
years. “Louisville is a mite chillier 
than Jacksonville,” said Si, pulling up 
his collar. Paul Cohen and Casey 
Lowicki from Banner Specialty in 


Pittsburgh joined us for a little re- . 
freshment Thurs. eve. Likewise Irv | 
Margold from Trimount who enjoyed ] 
company of overseas music and games | 
operator Bill Chapman. Bill, who can b 
tell more stories than we can print, | 
had to join his wife in Cleveland and | 
fly back that night. Always a pleasure 
to chat with Bruce, Gerry and Jack 
from Hermitage (last seen fighting 
through the 14th course at Chicago’s | 
Club El Bianco). Messers Lynch and Jl 
Holyfield from Lynch Dist. in New 1 
Orleans lent their sage remarks at Ij 
the ‘'Show and TelT sessions Friday T] 
noon. ’Twas a terrific two days. I| 

HERE AND THERE— Mutoscope’s 'I 
Larry Galenti told us he congratulates , 
Color-Sonics’ Mickey Greenman for | 
his explorations into creative types 1 
of film production, apart from the 
go-go fare . . . Jack Wilson of the i 
New York State Ops Guild reminds T 
members of next meeting slated for II 
the Hotel Washington in Newburgh |l 
on Feb. 21st. Meet starts promptly 
at 7:30 p.m, . . . Hitmaker Neil Dia- 
mond set for Annapolis, Md. concert 
on Feb. 24th . . . UjS. Billiards’ Lenny || 
Schneller gearing up for Long Island Y 
8-Bally Tourney — 'will advise local ^ 
trade . . . Next N.Y. UJA committee Ij 
meet this Tues. Feb. 6th at 58th St. 1 
headquarters. Gil Sonin will com- ’ 
mence the gathering at 6:00 p.m. 1 
. . . Tommy Tarantelli and Jimmy 
Galuppi at the Syracuse onestop are 
picking Paul Revere’s ‘Too Much 
Talk’ on Columbia, Tony Bennett’s i 
‘A Fool of Fools’ on the same label .. 
and place special emphasis on A1 
Martino’s ‘Love is Blue’ on Capitol 
. . . Mort Heilig, inventor of the Sen- 
sorama Simulator, has brand new ^ 
model cooking up a collection storm 
at Hubert’s arcade on 42nd iSt. Drop 
in for a look — it’ll knock your eye j 
out! Mort says it’s grossing $125 a ' 
week . . . Jack Gordon, back from i 
European tour (including ATE) says 
his horse racing films will make 
mucho hay in Cinematic machines in 
England. 

ON THE HIGH ROAD— John Zeglin 1 
of Lieberman Music told us last week 
that Lieberman had taken on the Com- 
puter Quiz for distribution in Minne- 
sota, N. Dakota, S. Dakota and west- 
em Wisconsin . . . they were the sixth 
distrib to be inked by Nutting Asso- 
ciates, mfg. of the question-answer 
game, according to Bill Nutting and 
Ransom White. Nutting, also an- < 
nounced that Howard Bartly has been 
promoted to sales manager for the 
Calif, firm. Abe Lipsky, of Lipsky 
Dist. on N.Y.’s 10th Ave. celebrated 
his 20th anniversary in the coin biz 
Jan. 31st. (see Profile for story). 


M 

California Clippings 

EXPORT ORDERS ARE KEEPING . 
SIMON DISTRIBUTING HOPPING ^ 
. . . George Muroaka reports that the . 
export business has been just great ’ 
lately. He has one order going out to 
Australia and another headed for the 
European market. We got George just < 
as he returned from a Las Vegas golf 
tournament. We quizzed him on how 
he had done up there, but all he said 
was, “I don’t even want to talk about ^ 
it.” That answers the question! He did 
add that he had a wonderful time 
though. Back to business! We are told 
that they are expecting another ship- 
ment of the beautiful “Consul 130” to . 
arrive at any moment. George says 
that they are still getting lots of com- 
pliments on this handsome phono- 
graph. Also hear that the Valley pool 
tables are moving along very well. 

HAPPY EVERYTHING TO JIMMY f 
WILKINS. . . . Jimmy Wilkins of Paul 
A. Laymon Co. has a lot of things to 
celebrate this month. It’s his 17th an- 
niversary with the same firm, as well 
as his 42nd birthday. Have a Happy, 
Jimmy! We are told that they are 


82 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 



CaskBox 

WWW 


’Round the Route 


awaiting more shipments of Bally’s 
“World Cup” soccer game. They al- 
ready have them placed in such out- 
lets as Phoenix, San Bernardino, Or- 
ange County and Los Angeles County. 
We were very sorry to hear that they 
were turned down when they applied 
for a license. On to some better news. 
W'e hear thru the grapevine that Mr. 
and Mrs. A1 Cicero, from Santa Maria 
came down to see the “World Cup.” 
Freddie Anderson of Solvang also 
dropped in to say hello. 

UNITED POOL TABLES DUE TO 
ARRIVE AT ADVANCE AUTOMAT- 
IC SALES. . . . Bob Portale tells us 
that he is waiting anxiously for these 
new tables to finally arrive. Bob says 
that they have built a table that will 
enable one to play regulation pool. It 
also has a new buy back feature. Bob 
reports that he is very pleased with 
the success of Gottlieb’s new “Royal 
Guard.” 

BADGER SALES VERY PLEASED 
WITH NEW FISCHER. ... Leo 
Simone informs us that he couldn’t be 
happier with these new and improved 
tables. It’s full title is “Fischer Regent 
91 D”. Leo tells us that it is complete- 
ly changed. It now has a meter, re- 
inforced leg structure as well as other 
numerous styling and mechanism 
changes. The “Helicopter Trainer” is 
still continuing to sell. 

FROM THE RECORD RACKS. . . . 
Jerry Barish of California Music re- 
ports that things are looking very 
bright for the Sunshine Company with 
their latest Imperial release, “Look, 
Here Comes the Sun.” Jim and Jean 
are scoring with Verve disk “People 
World.” Glen Campbell seems to have 
a smash follow up to “By the Time I 
Get to Phoenix.” This one “Hey Little 
One,” on Capitol. Gladys Knight and 
the Pips are telling us that they are 
at the “End of the Road” on Soul. Joe 
Tex is saying that “Men Are Gettin’ 
Scarce.” 


Milwaukee Mentions 

Target date for the gala grand open- 
ing celebration at United Inc.’s new 
quarters is tentatively set for Monday, 
February 26 and Harry Jacobs, Russ 
Townsend, et al., are knee-deep in 
preparations for the big affair! Added 
to this, Russ tells us the firm recently 
took on distribution of the I.Q. Com- 
puter and is enjoying much success 
with it. The big problem is trying to 
get shipments to keep up with the 
demand! Harry Jacobs’ son, ParJ, 
who’s been helping out at the shop, is 
currently in basic training with the 
National Guard in New Jersey but he’s 
expected back in the spring. . . . Talked 
to John Jankowski over at Radio Doc- 
tors to get the word on what singles 
are scoring with operators in the area. 
Here are some of them; “It Keeps 
Right On A Hurtin’” by Johnny Til- 
lotson (MGM), “Kind Of A Hush” 
by Lenny Dee (Decca), “Step To The 
Rear” by Bing Crosby (Reprise), 
“Don’t Look Back” by the Johnny 
Mann Singers (Liberty) and Al Mar- 
tino’s “Carrying The World On My 
Shoulders” (Capitol), which is the flip 
side of “Love Is Blue.” 


Chicago Chatter 

MOA’s executive vice president 
Fred Granger issued the association’s 
1968 Membership Roster last week. 
Fred pointed out the fact that this 
year’s booklet contains many improve- 
ments and a wealth of i^ormation 
for members. First off, a contents 
page in front, a list of officers and 


directors with their telephone num- 
bers, members listed by city and state, 
a list of regional associations, a list 
of last year’s convention exhibitors 
and the MOA Code Of Ethics. . . . 
Needless to say, Chicago Dynamic 
Industries’ “All Stars,” the new 2- 
player baseball game is creating a 
great deal of excitement at the plant. 
Mort Secore items that the firm will 
begin shipping on Monday (5) to its 
network of distributors across the 
country! ... . Attention sports fans: 
WBKB-TV (Channel 7) will telecast 
six and one-half hours of uninterrupt- 
ed sports coverage (including the Win. 
ter Olympics) from 12 Noon to 6:30 
P.M. on Saturday, February 10! . . . 
ICMOA’s meetings and publicity com- 
mittee met last Tuesday and set up 
April 5 and 6 as the dates of the next 
general membership meeting, to be 
held in the St. Nicholas Hotel, Spring- 
field, 111. The committee also sched- 
uled the association’s annual meeting 
for September 13-14-15 at the Leland 
Hotel in Springfield. . . . Invitations 
are in the mail for the premiere Vend- 
ing Open House which World Dist. 
will host on Sunday, February 11, in 
its showrooms at 2730 W. Fullerton 
Ave. Refreshments will be seiwed. 
The distrib plans a most impressive 
display of vending eqmpment for in- 
spection and demonstration during the 
day-long event! . . . Pat O’Malley, 
Canteen Corporation president, an- 
nounced the election, by the firm’s di- 
rectors, of Daniel A. Nimer as Vice 
President-Corporate Planning. . . . 
“Royal Guard” continues to generate 
excitement at D. Gottlieb & Co. Alvin 
Gottlieb sez it’s proving to be one of 
the firm’s biggest sellers! . . . lAAP’s 
Bob Blundred departed for Las Vegas 
to attend the association’s manage- 
ment conference at the Desert Inn. . . . 
Atlas Music Co.s’ Joe Kline reports 
stepped up activity in all departments 
— music, vending, games, etc. . . . 
Talked to Joe Ceddia over at Lormar 
and he clewed us in on what’s doing, 
singlewise, on the local juke box scene. 
Both versions of “Love Is Blue,” the 
Paul Mauriat and Al Martino, are 
starting to happen. Also, “Look Of 
Love” by Ramsey Lewis, “Dock At 
The Bay” by Otis Redding, “Engine 
Engine #9” by Wayne King and 
“Simon Sez” by the 1910 Fruit Gum 
Co. 


Upper Mid West 

The South Dakota Vending and 
Music Association held their quarterly 
meeting at Rapid City, Sunday and 
Monday Jan. 21-22. Hosting the meet- 
ing were Lloyd Morgan and Buzz 
Oligmiller of the Rushmore Amuse- 
ment Co. and John Roberts of the 
Rushmore Vending Co. The usual 
buffet supper Sunday evening and the 
banquet Monday evening, cocktails 
and the works . . . Election of officers 
were held and the same board of 
officers were elected for another term 
as the president and vice-president 
and sec’y-treas. . . . there was a very 
unusual turnout at this meeting, one 
of the smallest in many years. Opera- 
tors at the meeting were Dean 
Schroeder, Aberdeen, Mr. & Mrs. Earl 
Porter, Mitchell, Mac Hasvold, Sioux 
Falls, Mr. & Mrs. John Trucano, Dead- 
wood . . . new members Douglas San- 
ford, Valentine, Neb. Roy Smith, 
White Clay, Neb. and Mr. & Mrs. 
Lloyd Morgan, Mr. & Mrs. Buzz Olig- 
miller, and Mr. & Mrs. John Roberts 
of Rapid City . . . Distributor repre- 
sentatives at the meeting were Solly 
Rose, Lieberman Music Co., Glen 
Charney, Viking Vending Co., Warren 
Sandler, Sandler Vending Co. Eddie 
Zorinsky, H. & Z. Co., Larry Rogen- 
meir. Acme Music Co., Irv. Linder- 
holm, F. & M. Co. Clair Wesley, K. & 
C. Co., and Earl Paige from Billboard 
. . . Next meeting to be held in Sioux 
Falls sometime in May, no date set as 
yet. Mac Hasvold will host the next 
meeting . . . 


ARE YOU READY FOR THE COMPUTER GENERATION! 


They demand sophisticated entertainment and 
that's what we provide! 


DISTRIBUTORS 

WE ARE LAUNCHING A CAMPAIGN TO SIGN 
THE BEST DISTRIBUTORS IN THE COUNTRY! 
Nutting Associates is the innovator in this new 
and highly profitable market. 



Consider these important reasons why Computer Quiz has 
found the NEW MONEY in the Industry. 

GREATER PLAYER APPEAL 

ir Fascinating electronic nixie tube score readout. 

~k Score based on accuracy and speed of answering. 
ir 2500 different questions per film program. 

•k Random selection of questions. 

'A' Stepping relay time clicks to heighten excitement. 

-k Film program with illustrations is now available. 

GREATER OPERATOR APPEAL 

k: Goes into new and highly profitable locations. 
ir 5<-10^-25< coin acceptor; 10< play per game. 

-k Easy-to-service plug-in modular construction. 
ir Test button that by-passes both meters. 

-k Monthly grosses (documented) as high as $500-$600! 


Can you think of any reason why it is not to your advantage 
to call us now? 415-961-9373. 


NUTTING 
A S S O C I AT E S 

556 ELLIS STREET 
MOUNTAIN VIEW, CALIFORNIA 94040 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


83 



MUNICH OP SET 4th PjV SPOT 



Inside the Zwingereck, customers will find a Rowe AMI Music Merchant (on 
the right) and the companion PhonoVue (ppper left). A PhonoVue selection 
goes for 50 Pfennigs (about 12 American). 


MUNICH — The fourth Rowe AMI 
Music Merchant phonograph and 
PhonoVue combination was installed 
here in Munich early in December in 
a brand new restaurant location called 
the ‘Zwingereck.’ The music and film 
installation is operated by Ludwig 
Jobst, who since his entrance into the 
German coin machine business in 1949, 
is among the oldest and most progres- 
sive operators in the area. 

Jobst, who obtained the equipment 
through ami’s regional distributor 
Franken-Automaten, has three other 
Music Merchant and PhonoVue loca- 
tions in this city. As a matter of fact, 
the very first Rowe Music Merchant 
put out on location in Germany was 
effected by Jobst through Franken- 
Automaten about one year ago. 

Jobst advised that he vends a Phono- 
Vue selection (with its accompanying 
record) for 50 Pfennigs (about I 2 V 24 


American), the same price he charges 
for two record selections without 
PhonoVue film. The 10 Pfennig slot 
has been completely abolished here in 
favor of the smaller, “dime-sized” 50 
Pfennig piece. 

Jobst further advised that store- 
keepers in his PhonoVue locations ac- 
cept a smaller commission cut of the 
cash box (between 20 and 30%) in 
return for the advantages that the 
film machine provides as a crowd- 
gatherer. “We explain the higher cost 
of equipment, the added cost of renew- 
ing film selections and advise the inn- 
keeper that this excellent entertain- 
ment attraction will bring more money 
for him in the end through beverage 
and food sales,” he stated. The fact 
that Jobst continues placing Phono- 
Vue’s is ample proof of their profit to 
the operator, according to officials at 
Franken-Automaten. 


If you are reading 
someone eke s copy of 

Cash Box 

why not mail this coupon 


today 



CASH BOX 
1780 BROADWAY 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 10019 


Enclosed find my check. 

□ $20 for a full year (52 weeks) subscription (United 
States, Canada, Mexico) 

□ $40 for a full yeor (Airmail United States, Canada 
Mexico) 

O $30 for a full year ((other countries) 

□ $45 for a full year (Airmail other countries) 


Please Check Proper 
Classification Below 
MY FIRM OPERATES THE 
FOLLOWING EQUIPMENT: 

JUKE BOXES n 

AMUSEMENT GAMES □ 

CIGARETTES □ 

VENDING MACHINES □ 
OTHER 


NAME . . 
FIRM . . . 
ADDRESS 


CITY STATE ZIP # 

Be Sure To Check Business Classification Above! 


CashBox 'Round The Route 


Houston Happenings 

Over 50 servicemen and mechanics 
attended first session of H. A. Franz & 
Co. Seeburg phonograph service school 
on night of Jan. 17th. That was a high 
record attendance for such an affair 
in this area. The school is directed by 
Jack Mulford, Seeburg factory service 
engineer. After eight weeks of basic 
instruction an advanced course, on 
same schedule, will follow. In addition 
to main school in the Franz Company 
display hall each Wednesday night, 
an out of town school is held one night 
each week by the firm. Such sessions 
already have been held at St. Augus- 
tine on Jan. 22 and at Beaumont on 
Jan. 29 with Galveston scheduled for 
Feb. 6 and Bryan Feb. 12th. . . . Beau- 
mont, Texas, boasting some half dozen 
major operating firms, is one of the 
leading coin operated cities in this 
area, (^lonsiderable prestige of slight- 
ly different type was recently added. 
Allie Martin and Charles Pearson, re- 
porters-cameramen for KBMT TV, 
Ch. 12, Beaumont, spent three weeks 
in South Vietnam taking pictures and 
interviews over the entire country. 
These were first televised Jan. 25 un- 
der title of “The Boy Next Door In 
Vietnam” with Gulf Coast Utilities as 
sponsor. The hour long telecast, not 
once interrupted commercially, re- 
ceived tremendous local reception. 
Martin and Pearson, who criss-crossed 
at picture and mike duties, were cred- 
ited with a super job for both photog- 
raphy and spot interviews. Naturally 
most of the fighting men interviewed 


were from Texas and Beaumont in 
particular. . . . John E. Williams, ABC 
Music, adding to his already extensive 
phonograph operations. . . . Don Jan- , 
icek, owner Don’s Bellaire Record , 
Shop, uses a smooth promotion for dis- f 
counter competition. With each pur- 
chase of records or home entertain- 
ment above a stated minimum amount 
he gives cash coupons good on future 
purchases over a stated minimum. Don 
said the plan had proven successful in 
bringing back young and older cus- * 
tomers. . . . Melvin J. Blum, veteran 
coinman and outstanding operator in # 
Bay City, on routine business shop- 
ping tour of the city. . . . L. C. Butler, 
head of Gulf Coast Distributing Co. 
(Houston and San Antonio) mentioned 
that Dick Farrell, well known N.L. 
baseball pitcher (Philadelphia Phil- . 
lies) had done an excellent job as , 
sales representative and promotions 
for Wurlitzer phonographs and other ,♦ 
coin operated equipment handled by I 
the firm. . . . 55,000 fans, largest .j 
crowd ever to watch a college basket- ^ 
ball game anywhere, packed “The 
Astrodome” for a regular scheduled 
basketball game between University 1 
of Houston and University of Califor- y 
nia at Los Angeles. Record breaking 
crowd was rewarded with a great 
game, won in final seconds by UH 71 p 
to 69. Before the game UCLA was 
rated first in the Nation but after the 'w 
game UH took over that position. In- ' 
cidentally, San Jacinto Junior College 
basketball team, Pasadena, Texas ^ 
(which joins Houston on east) is the 
nation’s top-ranked JC team. 


Accounting Aids 
To Issue From NAM A 

CHICAGO — A brand-new NAMA pro- 
gram to help vending operators with 
accounting and cost controls will be 
introduced at the 1968 Western Con- 
vention in Los Angeles. Developed for 
the association by the accounting firm 
of Price Waterhouse & Co., the Los 
Angeles presentation will be the first 
of a series to be repeated at each of 
the NAMA Regional Management 
Conferences this Spring. 

“How To Evaluate A Location In 
Preparing A Bid Proposal” will be the 
main part of the introductory presen- 
tation, although general cost control 
and accounting procedures will also 
be covered, said Meyer Gelfand, the 
new NAMA president. 

The accounting firm of Price Water- 
house & Co. was retained by NAMA 
in July, 1967, to develop special forms 
and controls for routemen’s activities, 
as well as accounting and reporting 
procedures which will provide NAMA 
member firms with more accurate fi- 
nancial information on their operations. 
The model systems will also provide 
the operator with uniform bid pro- 
posals to help him evaluate the poten- 
tial profitability of a location. 

The first segment of the six-part 
system will be presented at the West- 
ern Convention and at the Regional 
Management Conferences. The first 
nortion will deal with “The Value of 
Profit Planning,” “Evaluation of a 
Location and Preparation of a Bid 
Proposal,” and “Evaluation Measures 
of a Bid Proposal”. The remaining 
five topics which will be provided to 
members later in 1968 will cover 
“Route Accountability,” “Increasing 
Profitability Through Improved Mer- 
chandising Practices,” “Controls Over 
Warehouse Inventories,” “Machine 
Sei'vice Control,” and “Budgeting, Al- 
location of Costs and Development of 
Net Profit by Product,” Gelfand said. 

The staff of Price Waterhouse & Co. 
will present the first of the account- 
ing procedures at the Western Con- 
vention and at the Regional Manage- 
ment Conferences. Price Waterhouse 
& Co. also prepares the annual “Op- 
erating Ratio Report” for NAMA. 

The association’s Western Conven- 
tion-Exhibit will be held at the Am- 
bassador Hotel in Los Angeles, Calif., 
Maz'ch 22 to 24. 


Auto, Pdts, Names 
Field Service Rep 



Bill Herbord, service manager for 
Automatic Products is shown here on ' 
the right with Hank Swalve on the 
left. Automatic’s Pastryshop vendor < 
is at the left also. 


ST. PAUL, MINN. — The naming of - 
Henry (Hank) Swalve as field service 
engineer has been announced by Auto- 
matic Products Company, St. Paul, 
Minn., manufacturer of the Smoke- - 

shop, Candyshop, Pastryshop, and 

Snackshop vendors. , , 

Swalve, a seven-year veteran of the 
vending machine industry, will work 
with Automatic Products distributors ^ 
in handling service matters and in con- 
ducting service schools. His appoin- > 
ment reflects “a continuation of our i 
program to expand activities in the 
field,” said William L. Herbord, serv- 
ice manager. i 

“We feel that Hank’s qualifications, . 
experience, and skill will greatly bene- ) 
fit our distributors and their cus- t 
tomers,” said Herbord. 

He added that Automatic Products ' 
Company plans to increase the number 
of field service schools, “which have r 
proved so successful.” Subjects cov- i 
ered at these schools include general ^ f 
servicing techniques, demonstrations, 
and discussions of the unique features ' 
of the Smokeshop, Candyshop, Pastry- ' M 
shop, and Snackshop. 

For further information on the 
I schools, write the company at 301 
I Chestnut St., St. Paul, Minn. 55102. ' 


84 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 





Nutting Inks Liberman 


' PROFILE ON; ABE LIPSKY—His 20th Year Of Success 

' WWW 


Wednesday, January 31, 1968, 
marked Abe Lipsky’s 20th anniversary 
in the coin machine business. Abe is 
this week’s Cash Box Profile subject. 
As Captain Dan Kipnis and Quar- 
> termaster Abe Lipsky stood on the 
I deck of an LST off Okinawa in 1945, 
4 Kipnis looked over the ruined beach 
and the thousands of soldiers who had 
swarmed up on it, tanks and lorries 
^ moving over the sand. “Abe,” Kipnis 
said “if I go into business in New 
York you’ve got to come in with me.” 
Then, one day in 1948, Abe picked 
up the phone to hear Kipnis say, “Abe, 
I’m coming to New York to open up a 
phonograph distributorship from Wur- 
litzer. You’re not going to let me run 
around in a strange city all by my- 
self, are you ? ” 

It was on the 31st day of January, 
1948, that Abe went to work for his 
former Navy skipper. Ban Kipness, a 
partner in the Young Distributing 
firm, Wurlitzer distributor for the 
, state of Ohio. 

/ “It has been 20 years of close friend- 
ships with many good people,” Lipsky 
- said, “all the fellows on the Avenue 
here in New York are some of the 
finest men in the business and we’re 
, all just plain good friends . . . like a 
^ big family.” 

“Young Distributing had a few 
' y routes in the New Ydrk area and I was 
J working one of them up until they 
sold out the routes, then I went inside 
-» as a salesman and of skipper Kipnis 
went back to Chicago to practice law. 

' Then in 1958, another firm took over 
the Wurlitzer line and I went to 
Philadelphia and formed the All-Type 
Vending Corporation, where I had 
* the Wurlitzer, Valley and Keeney 
lines.” Abe went on to tell us, “In 
1960, I came back to New Ybrk as 
: Libra Distributing and in 1961, 
changed the name to Lipsky Distri- 
butors. A good part of those years were 
spent traveling back and forth from 
Philadelphia to New York. Then after 
I experienced a heart attack four 
years ago, the doctors advised me to 
quit driving so much and I started 
riding a bus. This became burdensome 
so I moved to Yonkers, New York for 
a year and then to Ft. Lee, New 
J ersey, just across the river from the 
George Washington Bridge and I’ve 
been living there ever since.” 

Lipsky Distributors sells mostly re- 
^ conditioned coin machine and vending 
equipment to the many customers who 
yvisit the Tenth Avenue offices each 
■ week. “All of our vending equipment 
is reconditioned out in Brooklyn and 
■ the phonographs and games are done 
here in our repair shop,” Abe went on 
to say, “I have two very efficient men 
working back there.” Lipsky also deals 


I in some new equipment, “I distribute 
the Valley, United and Fischer line 
of pool tables and Nat Solo’s counter 
game, Hot-Rod,” said Lipsky. 

The majority of used equipment 
coming into Lipsky’s is taken in trade, 
while some is bought through classified 
sections of various trade publications 
and word of mouth. 

“I also do some exporting,” Abe 
said, “to such countries as Greece, 
Puerto Rico, Equador, Peru and 
Guiana. I’ve been doing business for 
many years with these countries and 
also do a lot of converting the mach- 
ines to 50 cycles (difference in volt- 
age) .” 

Lipsky feels, “being a jobber has 
both good and bad advantages over 
being a full-fledged distributor. Being 
a jobber, you miss out on the full 
mark-up on new equipment (some- 
times as high as $300 to $400) , but 
then, being a jobber you don’t have too 
high of an overhead.” 



Abe Lipsky 


Lipsky has never been an operator 
as so many of his business associates 
have, “I always found that a firm 
selling equipment and having regular 
customers was resented by those cus- 
tomers if he also operated . . . you 
would be competing with your own 
customers,” Abe said. “Sometimes, I 
think maybe it was a mistake not to 
operate, but thats all in the past.” 
As far as the recent counter game 
trend is concerned, Lipsky says this, 
“the counter games have been good 
for the industry, it has allowed the 
operator a chance to give his locations 
something new and different and to 
collect a lot of nickles that he would 
otherwise miss out on. I can remember 
when the old penny counter games 
first came out, boy, they created quite 
a stir and nearly every operator in the 
country was buying them . . . one in 


particular that was really popular 
back then was one called, ‘Home Run’, 
when you consider how badly this 
industry needs something new to help 
revitalize it, the counter games have 
been good.” 

Lipsky also thinks that the new 
question and answer type games that 
have come on the market recently will 
add to the industry’s brightly de- 
corated Christmas tree, “they just 
might take off like wildfire, once the 
operator gets used to them. One thing 
is certain . . . they have to be brought 
down into the popular price range of 
other pieces of amusement equip- 
ment.” 

On the audio-visual concept Abe’s 
feelings are about the same, “here 
again, they’ll have to compete with 
the average price of the regular 
phonographs and the availability of 
film subjects will depend a great 
deal on the successful acceptance of 
the audio-visuals.” 

“I personally,'* Abe went on to say, 
“feel that if some of today’s more 
popular artists are on film performing 
their particular talent, it will increase 
the number of operators who might . 
become potential customers.” 

“Location loans and bonuses are so 
exorbitant today that it’s really 
amazing how some of these operators 
can turn a profit.” Lipsky said, “this 
is probably the biggest problem facing 
the average operator today. Unless 
something is done to change the whole 
Situation around, tnen those locations 
are going to be the operators and the 
actual operators are going to be left 
out in the rain holding an empty 
wallet. Its gotten to the point where 
the location could care less what kind 
or how old the equipment is as long 
as he gets those loans and bonuses.” 
We’ll all probably see the day when 
the coin machine business will wind 
up in the hands of several large 
operators and the little guy will be 
left out in the rain without an 
umbrella.” He added. 

We asked the very modest 1966 
United Jewish Appeal Guest of Honor, 
if he could remember the first machine 
he ever sold and not only did he re- 
member the machine, but the year 
and the man’s name he sold it to, 
“yeah, I sold good friend Charlie 
Morell a 1948 Wurlitzer 1015 phono- 
graph.” Its a good bet that Abe can 
remember how much he made on it, 
too. 

The mild-mannered easy going Lip- 
sky is one of Tenth Avenue’s legends. 
His individuality, his sales record and 
his drive have earned him the respect 
of his associates in the trade — that’s 
why we pay tribute to him on this — 
his 20th anniversary in the business. 


MOUNTAIN VIEW, CALIF— Ransom 
White, director of marketing for Nut- 
ting Associates, revealed last week 
that the California firm had inked the 
Liberman Music Co. to distribute Com- 
puter Quiz in the Minnesota, South 
Dakota, North Dakota and Western 
Wisconsin territories. 

Liberman is the sixth distributer 
signed in Nutting’s recent drive to set 
up a nationwide network of distribu- 
tors for their question and answer 
game, Computer Quiz. 

John Zeglin, of Liberman Music, 
stated in reference to taking on the 
quiz game, “We were hesitant at first, 
but after testing Computer Quiz for a 
few weeks, we found out that earn- 
ings were good and acceptance by 
both operators and John Q. Public was 
very high.” 

White also announced the promotion 
of sales representative , Howard J. 
Bartly to Sales Manager. Bartly will 
work directly with distributors in co- 
ordinating marketing of the Computer 
Quiz. 



NEW GAMING DEVICE, 
NEVADA APPROVED 

Offering world-wide profit potential, 
the industry’s only cheatproof game 
is copyrighted and will be patented. 
Requires $100,000 financing (14 in- 
itially, % over 6 months) in return 
for 50% of company plus complete 
repayment. 

Contact; Jack Weinstein, 517 
Security Bank of Oregon Bidg., 
310 SW 6th Ave., Portland, Ore- 
gon 97204 . , . (503) 227-2534. 


A/ew Panoram Film Units 



,NEW FROM URBAN INDUSTRIES— Pictured on the left is Urban’s latest 
Panoram film machine. Model, Mark 1-P . . . the cabinet is 25 inches wide, 
70" high and 30" deep at the top. The picture screen size is 24" wide and 15" 
high. The unit also comes with a formica cabinet (Mark 1-F). The picture at 
right shows Panoram model AP-11, dimensions are: 20 %" wide, 33" high and 
'< 26" deep. The screen size is 19" wide and 13" high. Details on the new equip- 
' ment can be obtained by writing to Nat Bailen at Urban Industries, Inc., P.O. 
Box 31, Louisville, Kentucky 40201. 


ITS A Hir! 

CHICAGO COIN’S 

I 2-PLAYER 

ALL STARS 

IT PAYS TO 
WAIT FOR IT! 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 


85 








CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SECTION 


CLASSIFIED AD RATE 20 CENTS PER WORD 

Count every word including all words in firm name. Numbers in address count as 
one word. Minimum ad accepted $5.00. CASH OR CHECK MUST ACCOMPANY ALL 
ORDERS FOR CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING. If cash or check is not enclosed with order 
your classified ad will be held for following issue pending receipt of your check or cash. 

NOTICE— $72 Classified Advertisers. (Outside USA add $52 to your present subscription 
price). You are entitled to a classified ad of 40 words in each week's issue for a period 
of One Full Year, 52 consecutive weeks. You are allowed to change your Classified Ad 
each week if you so desire. All words over 40 will be billed at the rate of 20c per 
word. Please count words carefully. Be sure your Classified Ad is sent to reach New York 
publication office by Wednesday, 12 Noon, of preceding week to appear in the follow- 
ing week's issue. 

Classified Ads Close WEDNESDAY 

Send all copy to: CASH BOX, 1780 Broadway, New York 19, N.Y. 


RECORD RIOT, 45S, BRAND NEW RECORDS. 
Some late hits, $6.50 per 100, $65.00 per 
1000. All orders shipped immediately. Send 
check with order for prepaid postage. Only 
in United States. RELIABLE RECORD CO., 
BOX 136, GLEN OAKS POST OFFICE, GLEN 
OAKS, N.Y. 11004 PHONE: (212) 343-5881. 


LATE MODELS SEEBURG AND ROCK-OLA 
Phonographs at lowest prices. DAVE STERN, 
SEACOAST DISTRIBUTORS, 1200 NORTH 
AVENUE, ELIZABETH, N.J. 


FOR SALE: USED BALLY, MILLS, PACE, JEN- 
nings, Sega Slot Machines, Keeney Uprights, 
Bally Bingos. BALLY DISTRIBUTING COM- 
PANY, 44 W. LIBERTY ST., RENO, NEV. 
TELEPHONE 702-323-6157. 


WA NT FOR SALE 


AUTO PHOTO MODELS 11, 12, 14 & 17. 
Phila. Skee Balls. Cash or Trade. Photo Vend, 
1351 Grand Ave., Chicago, III. 


WANTED: Hideaways and Wall Section boxes 
and Rockola Wall Juke Boxes. HENDON 
AUTOMATICS LTD. 50, CREWYS ROAD, 
LONDON, N.W.2. Tel: 01-458-5487. 


WANTED: Working partner in Music & Games 
Route. Industrial area. Good Potential. 
Write: Paul Angeli, 239-30th. St. N.W. 
Canton, Ohio. Call: 492-5382. Stark Novelty. 


WANT— AUDIO-VIDEO MACHINES, SHUFFLE- 
boards with anti cheats, scoring units. Per- 
sonal music equipment. Write stating make, 
model, condition and best cash price. ST. 
THOMAS COIN SALES, 669 Talbot St., St. 
Thomas, Ontario, Canada. Area 519-631- 
9550." 


WANTED TO BUY: KICKER AND CATCHER 
games, also other penny games, can use 
Play land Rifles. RELIABLE COIN MACHINE 
CO., 1433 W. Sherwin Ave., Chicago, ill. 


RECORDS, 45's AND LP's SURPLUS RE- 
turns, overstock cut-outs, etc. HARRY 
WARRINER KNICKERBOCKER MUSIC CO. 
— 453 McLEAN AVE., YONKERS, N.Y. (Tel. 
GReenleaf. 6-7778). 


WANTED— YOUR USED 45 RPM RECORDS. 
We pay freight and up to 13^. REC-O-RAC 
942 DEODAR, ESCONDIDO, CALIFORNIA. 
(TEL. 714-745-5942). 


45 RPM RECORDS, NEW. NO QUANTITY TOO 
large or small. Highest prices paid. Write 
stating quantity on hand. TONY GALGANO 
DIST. CO., 4135 W. ARMITAGE, CHICAGO 
39, ILL. (Tel. Dickens 2-7060). 


WANT: RECORDS, 45's, USED OR NEW. ALSO 
LP stocks, any quantity. Will buy on steady 
basis. BEACON RECORD DISTRIBUTORS, 
725 BRANCH AVENUE, PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
02904. PHONE: UN-1-7500 or JA-1-5121. 


USED 45 RPM RECORDS, ALL TYPES AS 
they run, right off the route. No sorting or 
picking. We pay freight from anywhere in 
U.S.A. Standing order available for regular 
shippers. JALEN AMUSEMENT CO., 1215 S. 
HOWARD STREET— B ALTIMORE, MD 21230. 

WANT TO BUY USED AND NEW PINBALL 
GAMES, ADDABAL one & two players every 
kind of models MFD 1964, 1965, 1966 and 
olso guns, bowlers, arcade, make offer to 
Robert Mauro, ELECTROPHON, VIA MEL- 
CHIORRE 6101A 41a, MILANO (ITALY). 


WANT: NEW OR USED 45 RPM SINGLE NOT 
over 6 months old. We pay 1 1 i each and 
the freight and we can use 200 of one 
number. Phone: 312-344-3300. CHAS. 

ALZNER, 2000 So. 3rd Ave., Maywood 
Illinois. 


WE ARE ALWAYS INTERESTED IN USED ANC 
brand new phonographs, pinballs, bingos 
guns, arcade, kiddie rides, slot machines 
etc., all makes, all models. QUOTE FOE 
SEA VESSEL TO HOLLAND BELGIE EUROPE 
SPRL., 276 AVENUE LOUISE, BRUSSELS 5 
BELGIUM. CAB LE: HOBELEUROP/BRUSSELS 

WANTED TO BUY USED AND NEW PINBALl 
games two or four players, Wurlitzer juk< 
boxes, Jennings slot machines every kind o: 
models 1965, 1966, 1967 and spare parts 
make an offer to AUTOMAT-TJANST N 
STORGATAN 19 BJUV SWEDEN 


DISTRIBUTORS WANTED: BELCANTO RE- 

cords — The Great Singers — Caruso, Farrar, 
Sutherland, Etc. Catalogue of 49-12" LP's 
Write: EICHLER RECORD CORP., 815 

BROADWAY, NEW YORK, N.Y. 10CX)3 

WANT TO BUY: ALL TYPES OF COUNTER 
Games. All Makes and Models. Quantity 
available and price. Cash waiting. LOWELL 
ASSOCIATES, 2401 W. BALTIMORE ST., 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 21223. TEL: (301) 
947-3785. 


WANTED: Tusko Elephant, Indian Scout, A 
cade Equipment. Seeburg 160 Wallboxe- 
AMI WQ 200-3 Wallboxes with accumulate 
K, L 200; Seeburg DS-160, AY 
222 W Dual Pricing, Back (Blass fc 
Melody Lane, Chi. Coin Pro Shuffle, Dolphir 
Call or write Cleveland Coin I'nal., 202 
Prospect Ave., Cleve., Ohio. Phone: (216 
861 “67 1 5. 


WE ARE CONSTANT BUYERS OF ALL AMUSI 
ment machines and surplus spare par 
for some . . . Write MAX LOBO & CC 
MEIR, 23, ANTWERP, BELGIUM. 

BINGOS — Late Bally wanted in Illinois: Falcc 
Inc. RR3, BOX C579, East A/oline, Illinois. 


FOR SALE: Bally Keeney and Games Uprights. 
Cash fxayout or free plays. Many models 
available. HENDON AUTOMATICS LTD 50, 
CREWYS ROAD, LONDON, N.W.2. Tel: 01- 
458-5487. 


Wm's Double Play, 10th Inning, Extra Inning. 
Gott. Cowboy, Clown, Majorette, Fashion 
Show, Un. Tango, Pacer, Crystal, Mid. Prem- 
ier. Chico Champion rifle. Phone or write. 
Jules Olshein at Greco Bros. 1288 Br'dy 
Albony, N.Y. 


ATTENTION POOL TABLE OPERATORS— POP- 
On Cue Tips fits all Brad Ferrules. 1 1 mm 
& 12 mm. Amazing material, more friction, 
longer lasting. 10?: each in quantities of 50. 
Send check or M.O. to JEFCOR INDUSTRIES 
INC., BOX 192, VALLEY STREAM, N.Y. 


USED BALLY FRUIT SLOT MACHINES START- 
ing at $495 each, for export. We are the 
Largest Supplier of Used Slot Machines in 
the world. Call, Write, Wire: NEVADA FRUIT 
SLOT MACH. CO., P.O. BOX 5734, RENO, 
NEVADA, 702-329-3932. 


SING ALONGS, KING OF DIAMONDS, SURF 
SIDES, SUPER SCORES, CROSS TOWNS, FULL 
HOUSES, HOT LINES, BEAT TIMES, BIG 
LEAGUES, APOLLOS, MINI GOLFS, STAR 
JETS, BAZAARS, SKY DIVERS, MAGIC CIR- 
CLES, WILD WHEELS, DELUXE FUN CRUISES, 
new, DELUXE FUN CRUISES, slightly used, 
BULLS EYE BASEBALLS, WIGGLERS, PLAY- 
TIMES, SKI BALLS, Midway-SPACE GUNS, 
LITTLE LEAGUES, Southland-TRAVELING 
PONYS, Urban Industries-NAME-A-SONG. 
Also, SHOOT-A-LINES, LITE-A-LINES, and 
all Bally bingos. 

If interested, call, write or wire New Orleans 
Novelty Company, 1055 Dryades Street, New 
Orleans, Louisiana, 70113. Tel. (504) 529- 
7321. Cable: NONOVCO. 


FOR SALE: CLEANED AND CHECKED 2 
player Melody Lane, Fashion Show $95.00 
eo.; Reserve, Ten Spot $75.00 ea. Soccer, 
Riverboat $145.00 ea.; North Stor, Bowling 
Queen $225.00 ea.; Skyline, Buckeroo 
$295.00 ea.; Full House $325.00. Del Coin 
Machine Co. 414 Kelker St. Harrisburg, Pa 
17105. Call: (717) 234-4731, 


FOR SALE — 300 LATE PIN BALL MACHINES 
fresh off of our summer locations. All mo- 
chines shopped and reconditioned and are 
location ready. Call: GLOBE AUTOMATIC 
VENDING COMPANY, 378 Granite Street, 
Quincy, Mass. 02169, Tel: 617-479-0010. 


FOR SALE: UNITED SHUFFLES— Pacer $395 
Mambo $475; Tiger $445; Orbit $460; Chee 
tah $550. Call or write: MOHAWK SKILI 
GAMES CO., 67 SWA(3GERTOWN RD, 
SCOTIA, NEW YORK 12302. 


HI-SPEED, SUPER FAST SHUFFLEBOARD WAX. 
24 one-pound cans per cose, $8.50 f.o.b. 
Dallas, Texas. Sold on money-back guar- 
antee. Dist. for D. Gottlieb, Rock-Ola, 
American Shuffleboard, Irving Kaye & Mid- 
way Mfg. Co. STATE MUSIC DISTRIBU- 
TORS INC., 3100 MAIN ST., DALLAS, 


FOR SALE: SEEBURG 480, $750.00, 220, $275 OC 
Wurlitzer 2410, $225.00; Rock-Ola 145! 
$1 1 5.00; 1 465, $1 1 5.00. Also used Pin Game: 
Bowlers and Guns. Bird Music Dist., Inc 
124 Poyntz, Manhattan, Kansas, Area Cod 
913 PR 8-5229. 


BINGOS LARGEST STOCK IN THE COUNTRY 
For Export Uprights; AMI, Rockolo & See- 
burg Phonos, Lite A Line, Shoot A Line, 
Lotto Fun, Track Odds, Twin Super Bells, 
Spot Bells. Crosse-Dunham & Co., 225 
Wright Ave., Gretna, La. 70053. Phone: 367- 
4365 


FOR SALE: VANGUARD, STATE FAIR RIFLES, 
Circus and Titan Rifle, very reasonable, also 
twenty five assorted Shuffle Alleys, no junk, 
at your own price. JEWEL COIN MACHINE 
C^ 27^^ W. Morse Chicago 60626 or phone 


WE HAVE A CHOICE SELECTION OF LATE 
Williams Two Players. Write for prices MID- 
WEST DIST. 709 LINWOOD BLVD.— KAN- 
SAS CITY, MO. 


SLOT/FRUIT MACHINES FROM £40 ($112). 
All makes, models. Manual, Electric. Avail- 
able English 6d only. Secondhand pintables, 
juke boxes, amusement machines, cheap, 
suitable for developing countries. HALEL 
ENTERPRISES LTD., 182A, NEW NORTH 
ROAD, LONDON, N. 1, ENGLAND. 


FOR SALE — SLICK CHICK-MID. 2 PL RACE- 
way-Will. Beat The Clock-Bally — Beauty 
Contest, Beach Beauty, Ice Frolics, Varietys, 
Bright Lights — 6 card Frolics, 6 card Show- 
boats-UN. Starlets — Bally Surf Clubs & At- 
lantics. NOBRO NOVELTY CO., 142 Dore 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 


CHANGERS — NEW HAMILTON CHANGERS— 
25# and 50# Below wholesale cost. Original 
Mutoscope Punching Bag A-1 $250.00; 

Downey Johnson Coin Counter — Complete 
$150.00. Complete stock new & used Guns 
— Phonos — Pool Tables — Cigarette Ma- 
chines. PAUL A. LAYMON, INC., 1429 W. 
PICO, LOS ANGELES, CALIF., PHONE: 749- 
7351. 


ACE LOCKS KEYED ALIKE. SEND LOCKS AND 
the key you want them mastered to $1.00 
each less 10% lots of 50 or more. RANDEL 
LOCK SERVICE, 61 ROCKAWAY AVENUE, 
VALLEY STREAM, N.Y. 11580. TEL: 516- 
VA 5-6216. Our 35th year in vending. 


POOL TABLES, NEW COIN-OP 7 FT., $500.00. 
Also home tables $500-up. Antique jukebox 
1930s. Also all kinds of vending equipment 
for sale at lowest prices. WEST PENN 
VENDING SALES, 1313 BABCOCK BLVD., 
PITTSBURGH, PA., 15237 (412) 931-2961. 


FOR SALE: WMS. BIG DADDY 1-P, $105.00; 
“Wms. Three Coin 1-P, $95.00; (soft. Show 
Boat 1-p, $75.(X); Gott. Aloha 2-p, $110.00; 
Gott. Liberty Bell 4-p, $150.00; Gott. Lancer 
2-p, $110.00. Write or call: TRI-STATE 
DIST., P.O. BOX 615, CALLIER SPRINGS 
RD., ROME, GEORGIA. Tel. 234-7123. 


FOR SALE: 25 ASSORTED NEW ALBUMS: 
$15.00. Our Choice Guaranteed New 33 Vi 
RPM LP Albums — Mailed Insured — Post- 
paid — Limited Sale Offer Good Only in 
USA. Send Check or Money Order — No 
COD'S. UNCLE JIM O'NEAL— BOX A — 
ARCADIA, CALIF. 91006. 


IF WE DON'T HAVE IT— WE'LL GET IT! YOU 
name it. Jennings and Mills fruit machines. 
Complete line of parts. Bally and Keeney 
Consoles, pinballs and bingoes. Exporters 
ATOMIC COIN, BOX 4321, N. LAS VEGAS, 
NEVADA. PHONE: 642-3847. 


BUYERS OF USED PHONOGRAPHS— WHOLE- 
salers or exporters. We guarantee our equip- 
ment. Write for prices. UNITED DISTRIBU- 
TORS, INC. 902 W. Second St., Wichita, 
Kansas 67201. Phone: 3 16- AM 4-6111. 


30 BINGOS, 20 TURF KINGS (TO BE SOLD 
in Virginia only), 25 Novelties, 4 Guns, 4 
Shuffles, 3 Baseballs, Lord's Prayer. Call or 
write E. L. SIMMONS, DANVILLE AMUSE- 
MENT CO., 620 WESTOVER DR., DAN- 
VILLE, VA. Phone: 792-5044. 


READ ALL ABOUT IT . . . HEAR ALL ABOUT 
the "Paper Man" . . . the New Hit From 
Noah's Ark . . . Noah's Ark will save the 
world! J&B RECORD PRODUCTIONS, P.O. 
BOX 14422, TAMPA, FLA. 33609. 813- 
839-4880. 


IF IT'S PANORAM PARTS YOU WANT PHIL 
GOULD HAS 'EM. ALL TYPES OF FILMS 
FOR Panoram Peeks. PHIL GOULD — 224 
MARKET ST.— NEWARK, N.J. (Tel. 201- 
MArket 4-3297). 


FIVE EXHIBITS: BIG BRONCO HORSE $150.00 
each, 1 Six-Shooter Gin, $75.00 and 1 Gun 
Patrol Exhibits $75.00. CENTRAL MUSIC 
CO., 407 EAST' AVENUE, D.P.O. BOX 284, 
KILEEN, TEXAS. 


POKERINO, RECONDITIONED, REFINISHED IN 
Blond Birch, with new drop chute, points, 
sockets, wire, knock off, trim, bock-glass, 
playfield decals. Write for details. New 
socket and point drop board wired for your 
games. JAMES TRAVIS— P.O. BOX 206 — 
MILLVILLE, N.J. 08332. 


EAGLE EYE BILLIARD CUES: Fiber-glass full- 
taper shaft. Really rugged and durable. Sug- 
gested operator cost — $3.75 — 57", $3.45 — 
52" — 6 doz. lots. Sold only thru distributors. 
Ellicottville Wood Products Corp., Reading, 
Penna. 19603. 


BINGOS FOR EXPORT ALL MODELS, GOLDEN ' 
(Sates, Con Cans, Roller derby's, Lagunos, 
County Fairs, Ballerinas, Carnivals, Seo Is- > 
lands. Bikinis, Circus Queens, Sun Volleys, 
Beach Times, Etc. Pin Balls Cineboxes pic- 
ture machines. Make offer. D. & P. Music, 

27 East Philadelphia St., York, Pa. 


FOR EXPORT — All makes and models late 
phonographs, pin games and vending equip- 
ment. Write for our latest bulletin. AD- 
VANCE DISTRIBUTING COMPANY, 4710 
Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, Missouri (314) FO 
1-1050), Cable Address ADCOIN. 


NEW YEAR CLEARANCE OFF OUR OWN ( 
routes — clean, mechanically reconditioned. 
PINBALL — Bonanza, Bowling Queen, Sea- 
shore, River Boat, Zig Zag, at $150.00. El 
Toro, Sweethearts, Son Francisco at $125.00 
Jumpin' Jacks, King Pin, Cover Girl, Flying '4 
Circus, Gi Gi, Lancer at $100.00. MUSIC — 
Wurlitzer 1900-$75.00. Wurlitzer 2104- 
$100.00. Wurlitzer 2204-$! 25.00. Wurlitzer -* 
23 10-$ 150.00. CIGARETTES — Smoke Shops, 

NO ROB JOBS— V-27, V-36-$1 00.00. Stor- 
lite 850-$225.00. Starlite 630-$200.00. 
DuGrenier 14 col. $35.00, 20 col. lowboy 
$65.00. STAN HARRIS & CO., 508 W. Ven- 
ango St., Phila., Pa. BA 3-5362. 


DO YOU KNOW THAT EVERY CONCEIVABLE 
type of Coin operated machine, modern or 
antique, can be obtained from Munves? The 
leader in arcade equipment for over 50 
years. Export-Import. Mike Munves Corp- 
577 10th Avenue, Dept. CB-New York, N.Y_ 
10036, 


% 


FOR SALE: 19 NEW TWIN DRAGON MA- 
chines (Keeney) and 25 used ones. Thes® y 
have cash payout units but are easily con- ^ 
verted to free play, also 70 Bally Grancfc 
Stands like new. SASKATCHEWAN COIN 
MACHINE CO., 1025-104 STREET, NORTH* ^ 
BATTLEFORD, SASKATCHEWAN, CANADA. « 
PHONE 445-2989. AREA CODE 306. ~ 


RECORD ALBUM SALE— MONO ONLY. MAJOR 
labels. Current stock, no cutouts or D.J.'s. \ 

$1.50 each lots of 50 or more PREPAID 
United States. No lists available. Remittance 
with orders. EMPIRE DISTRIBUTING CO., 
4610 Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15224 
(Tel. (412) 682-8437) 


FOR SALE: RECONDITIONED BARGAINS: Wur- 
litzer 2150 (200 Sel) $145.00; 2900-8 ( 200 , 

Sel. DISC) $595.00; 3000-7 (200 Sel.) % 

$645.00; Bally Shuffle Bowlers DeLuxe ABC 
— $35.00; Bowling Lanes 14'— $50.00; Chal- ■* 
lenger Bowler 14' — $95.00; United Bowling 
Alley 14' — $50.00. Mickey Anderson Amuse- 
ment Co., 314 East 11th St., Erie, Pa. Phone: "k 

452-3207. 


PANARAM USER'S— THEATRES— FILM DEVEL- 
opers 225 negatives 16 M.M. black-white, " 
Mint condition App 400 Ft. each. Art Nudes, 
beautiful Calif, subjects good library, money 
mokers. Also used film $8.(X) Loop. Write 
R. Richter, 1063 Market St. San Francisco, 
Calif. 


TERRIFIC BUSINESS FOR SALE.. Located south 
eastern Ontario, Canada, close to American 
border. Established over 8 years, approxi- 
mately $35,(XX) equipment (Market Value) 
Music & Games. Life time opportunity for 
right man, room for expansion. Profit Range i 
$18 to $20,000. Owner has other interests, 
must sell. United Dist. 1404 Main St. East, 
Hawkesbury 4, Ontario, Canada. Phone: 
ME 2-3553. 


FOR SALE: Williams Derby Day, like new 
$550.00, United Pyramid Shuffle Alley . 
shopped $525.00, Williams Double Play base- '■ 
ball, as is, $125.00, RCSU4 steppers for See- 
burg LPC-1 $49.95. Operators Sales, Inc., 
4122 Washington Avenue, New Orleans, Lou- 
isiana. 822-2370 (504). 


FOR SALE: 4 AMI FI 20 phonographs $89.50* 
each or oil 4 for $300. Budge Wright's West- 
ern Distributors, 1226 SW 16th Ave., Port— x' 
land, Oregon. 


MISC. 


DEEJAYS! 6,000 HILARIOUS CLASSIFIED ONE- ^ 
liners, written expressly for radio, only $5.(X)! 

Or send $9.00 for above plus 5,000 addition— ■ 
al "Clever Remarks!" Guaranteed to please^ 
you or money bock! Catalog of 50,000 pro- 
fessional comedy lines free. Edmund Orrin, ' i 
Mariposa, Calif. 95338. 


30,000 PROFESSIONAL COMEDY LINESl' 
Largest laugh library in show business. 
Forty books of classified material, plus Or- •; 
ben's Current Comedy the newsmaking, 
topical gag service featuring hip deejoy 
lines in each issue. Great sample selection, 
$5.00. Catalog free. ORBEN DEEJAY 
LAUGHS, 3536 Daniel Crescent, Baldwin' 
Harbor, N.Y. 11510. 


HOLLYWOOD GAG DIGEST! NOW MONTHLY I 
DeeJays need topicol, CLEAN quips . . . 
Yocks. Our service for DeeJays only! Sample- 
$2.00 or free info for stamp. Mention CASH 
BOX with sample order — receive Bonus <»og T 
Sheets FREE! MORRIS, 711 N. CHEROKEE, \ 
HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 90038. 


86 


Cash Box — February 10, 1968 



D 




Complete Line of Little LP’s Available at Redisco 1-Stop 


^ BALTIMORE, Md. — One of the na- 
tion’s oldest and largest one-stops, 
Redisco Records Distributing Com- 
pany, last week announced the avail- 
ability of little LP’s for sale. Accord- 
ing to Bucky Buchman, president of 
the company, “we have not only sup- 
plied our jukebox operator customers 


with product over the past 30 years — 
we have given much of our knowledge 
and experience.” Bucky further ad- 
vises, “the little LP market has be- 
gun to surge.” 

Redisco’s inventory has been stocked 
with all musical categories of little 
LP’s including: Popular, Country & 


Western, Old Favorites, Background I 
Music, Rhythm and Blues, Rock and | 
Roll, Soul and others. Bucky claims i 
that, “Redisco has little LP albums 
that jukebox players want to hear and 
will play.” To prove his point, a fre- 
quent and consistent mailing goes out 
to all jukebox customers of Redisco. 


“The list keeps growing as more op- 
erators ask for the infoi'mative Re- 
disco mail,” he added. 

Redisco is set up to service jukebox 
operators in desired record quantities 
and weekly or bi-weekly changes for 
jukebox routes. Title strips are fur- 
I nished free by Buchman’s company. 











! t